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La Buena Tierra

La Buena Tierra

Escrito por Pearl S. Buck

Narrado por Laura García


La Buena Tierra

Escrito por Pearl S. Buck

Narrado por Laura García

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (136 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2002
ISBN:
9781611553857
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Con La Buena Tierra la escritora estadounidense Pearl Buck gano el Premio Nobel de 1938, ya que este retrato de un campesino chino, pobrisimo, que a medida que va consiguiendo riquezas se vuelve mas depravado y se llena de vicios, tiene características universales y su hermoso lirismo, ademas de lo fuerte del argumento convirtio la novela en un clasico desde su misma publicacion. Es una obra inolvidable y hay quienes aseguran que la pueden leer una y otra vez, por que en esta obra siempre se encuentra algo nuevo.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2002
ISBN:
9781611553857
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973) was a bestselling and Nobel Prize–winning author. Her classic novel The Good Earth (1931) was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and William Dean Howells Medal. Born in Hillsboro, West Virginia, Buck was the daughter of missionaries and spent much of the first half of her life in China, where many of her books are set. In 1934, civil unrest in China forced Buck back to the United States. Throughout her life she worked in support of civil and women’s rights, and established Welcome House, the first international, interracial adoption agency. In addition to her highly acclaimed novels, Buck wrote two memoirs and biographies of both of her parents. For her body of work, Buck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938, the first American woman to have done so. She died in Vermont. 


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136 valoraciones / 146 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    There is a reason this book is a classic. Read it. Amazing.
  • (4/5)
    Solidly written tale of farming and family and how wealth depletes the spirit and character of peopleas they become less attached to nature and their land. Though I felt close to none of the family,it was O-lan's total lack of rights that made the book so sad.
  • (4/5)
    I loved the first 3/4 of this novel. The struggle of an incredibly poor Chinese family during ancient times. The father loved to farm and di what he needed to do to see his family survive. The last of the novel seem to slow and wasn't as fun to read. A sad ending that took a long time to get to.
  • (5/5)
    This is a family legacy book, a personal saga, a chronicle of the life and times of the main man Wang Lung. We follow his life in early 20th C China from the start of manhood, and his acquisition of a wife, to his last days. The times are hard, and intense, and even though big things are happening socially and politically, the book sees these changes thorough the eyes of Wang Lung. That is to say we dont see or hear about them unless they directly affect his life. This is as it would be when your primary goal is the survival of your family. This book was so good. So much happens yet the words are not crammed in. We are left with an impression of a man and his times that is so comprehensive. The pride and strength of Wang Lung are obvious, yet he also struggles with the ugly side of pride. His lifelong search for contentment is in vain which raises the question of how much does one need to feel happy. The tale is one of human nature, and in this regard it does a superb job of laying it out like it is.
  • (5/5)
    I wish I had to read this in high school, I know a lot of people did. What a wonderful book!
  • (4/5)
    Dieses 1931 erschienene Buch erzählt die Lebensgeschichte eines chinesischen Bauern. Nach und nach wird er von einem kleinen Bauern zum großen Grundbesitzer. Obwohl er nach wie vor an seinem Land hängt, verändert er sich doch charakterlich ziemlich. Seine Frau O-Lan, der er viel verdankt, verachtet er mehr und mehr aufgrund ihres einfachen Wesens und Aussehens. Erst gegen Ende ihres Lebens wird ihm klar, wie viel sie zu seinem Glück beigetragen hat. Seine Söhne achten das bäuerliche Erbe ihrer Vorfahren nicht und wenden sich von der Landwirtschaft ab.Dieses mehrfach preisgekrönte Buch erzählt sehr schlicht, aber eindringlich, von diesem einfachen Leben. Vor allem das Schicksal der Frauen, aber die auch die ländlichen Strukturen, die Verpflichtungen gegenüber den Verwandten usw. sind nahezu archaisch und doch noch nicht lange her.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book for the first time in 7th grade and just finished rereading it and experience reading the book couldn't be more different. What I remembered about the book before rereading it was that it was about a man and his land with his wife and how they struggled then changed when they had money. Rereading it, it was more sad and I hated the main character in the 2nd half of the book. I also didn't remember anything after O'lan dies, I suspect in 7th grade we read a slimmed down version. I didn't enjoy the book as much after O'lan dies it felt like the rest of the book was about waiting for Wang Lung to die as well even though he wasn't that old, he just kept preparing for it. I liked the foreshadowing from the beginning about the old house, I was glad to see that the end didn't exactly copy the fall of the old house but lead you to believe it was leading that way considering the sons wanted to sell the land. The ending was well done, but felt very rushed and random the last few chapters.This is a great book to read, lots of interesting characters and it's about their lifetime and it does the time really well.
  • (4/5)
    I never had to read this in school, for which I was grateful for at the time - always heard other students complaining about it. I don't know why! I found this a very interesting story, which moved along quickly. Opium dens, adultery, wars, secrets, betrayls, lots of juicy stuff! I wish it had more detailed historical information, but it definitely gave me better appreciation of Chinese culture
  • (4/5)
    The book gives us a glimpse of the patriarchal society of rural China with emphasis on a woman's status and worth. I appreciate the obvious heart of the author for farmers and the poor and the plight of women in Old China which is still true in some cultures now in our already modern times. I have no deep knowledge of Chinese culture, only the art and food as I experienced today. Pearl S. Buck has given me a peek into the "old ways" of China which may seem barbaric to us now with the slavery of young girls, arranged marriages, concubinage and women's binding of the feet. But she has presented it in a descriptive way, free of criticism and only attempting to narrate the facts of life as seen in the eyes of a proud patriarchal farmer in such times and through the eyes and heart of a rural poor wife in such era.I admire how the author has given power to the first wife character that even with her silence and seemingly blind obedience to her husband, she has the most profound grasp of their life and is the actual pillar of the family during their troubled times. She is a true matriarch with no voice, whose value is acknowledged by the husband only at the end. Her giving soul is so touching that a woman reader may question her own parenting and domestic capacity and duty as a wife.I recommend this book as a good slow read, that will give you an appreciation of the land, its toils and value both to the well-being of a person's body and soul.
  • (3/5)
    The Good Earth was a mediocre book with a deep historical meaning. This novel documented the life of a farmer as his level of success agriculturally and monetarily fluctuated multiple times. The way the story was told helped to give me a sense of how 1900s China was and the challenges many farmers living there faced. What I did not like about the story was that after about half-way through it began to get a bit repetitive. This caused me to lose interest, but this may also be because I am not easily entertained by historical novels. I am not trying to say that the book became completely uninteresting; I am trying to say that there was a point where I no longer cared how the main character would ultimately fare. If you are an avid lover of historical-fiction genre books then I definitely recommend this book to you, however to everyone else, the choice is your own.
  • (5/5)
    The vivid description make you become part of the story. I had a hard time putting the book down even in the tough parts of the story. I love that it is apart of my home library classics!
  • (4/5)
    At first, I really didn't think I'd like this book. Realizing Pearl S. Buck was an American white woman, I was immediately insulted for Chinese (American) readers and wanted to drop it for a more authentic novel. However, I decided to stick with it, and was gladly satisfied that I did.

    A beautiful tale of a Chinese man living in the pre-industrial/Communist country. I loved the way Buck worked around the constraints she faced with the treatment of women and how she managed to give them somewhat meaningful lives when the men around them controlled all of their actions.

    This is definitely worth reading, especially for lovers of classics and/or historical fiction about China.
  • (5/5)
    A classic story. It is a fast read and is timeless. The relationships are well developed. Even though the story happens in China it really is one that could take place anywhere. LOVED IT.
  • (2/5)
    Once upon a time, many if not most people lived a predominantly agrarian lifestyle. You were born on a farm, you lived on a farm, you died on a farm, and while you were alive you ate the food you grew. Money for things you couldn't grow came from selling the things that did. And then the Industrial Revolution happened, and cities boomed, and no matter how much presidential candidates like to say the opposite when they're spending time in Iowa at the beginning of the campaign cycle, the era of the small family farm is effectively over and it's never coming back. That's not to say that no one in America lives on a family farm anymore, obviously, but the numbers are small and declining every year.Besides Iowa, why is it that we romanticize those days so much? For my money, there's a very profound appeal of a time when it seemed like life was so much simpler, when you worked with your hands to get what you needed. Especially in this day and age, where I'm sitting at a desk typing this into a computer, but the sentimental attachment to that time seems to have been around for quite a while, because when Pearl Buck won the 1932 Pulitzer Prize for her novel The Good Earth, the Dust Bowl hadn't even happened yet.The Good Earth takes place in China in the early 1900s, and tells the story of the rise and subsequent decline of Wang Lung. A peasant farmer, the book opens with his marriage to O-Lan, a former slave for the Hwang family (the wealthiest landowners in the town close to where Wang Lung lives). O-Lan is not beautiful or clever, but she's just as hard of a worker as Wang Lung himself, and together the two of them manage to run his farm well enough that they are able to buy some of the Hwang's lands. They have two sons, but just after their first daughter is born, a terrible famine strikes. When there is no longer anything to eat and the countryside is turning to cannibalism to survive, the family sells most of their possessions (but Wang Lung refuses to sell their land) and moves south to survive through cheap labor and begging in the city. When a peasant uprising happens, Wang Lung and O-Lan grab money and jewels and return north. Having learned a powerful lesson about having reserves, the family buys the rest of the Hwang land and farms diligently, to the point where Wang Lung is wealthy and can send his children to school instead of keeping them in the fields. Indeed, soon Wang Lung himself doesn't need to be in the fields, and that's when the problems start.The book is not subtle about its equation of land and manual labor with virtue...the farther removed Wang Lung and his family get from the labor of their own hands on the earth they own, the farther they morally decline. Wang Lung becomes infatuated with a spoiled young prostitute and buys her for a concubine, putting aside his faithful wife. His school-educated sons marry petty women and have no interest in farming or running their father's holdings...like the once-wealthy and powerful Hwangs in the beginning, they just want to get rid of the land and seeking their fortunes elsewhere. It's actually pretty socialist in its depiction of money as evil and corrupting and the glorification of the proletariat lifestyle.At the end of the day, I just didn't like it very much. The characters aren't people, they're symbols who are used to illustrate Buck's parable. And they're not even particularly compelling symbols: Wang Lung is never all that sympathetic, O-Lan is a doormat, the sketchy uncle and his wife are terrible and gross right from the start. If reading all that Joseph Campbell recently taught me anything, it's that symbols done right can be incredibly powerful (for instance, Francis Ford Coppolla's The Godfather, and I'm specifically referring here to the great film rather than the mediocre book, tells a similar story about a man who becomes what he once despised in a much more interesting and emotionally resonant way). Not so here for me. The writing is solid, but not anything special enough to drive interest in the lack of a good story and characters. This particular piece of classic literature (which is a genre I've been exploring over the past few years) doesn't do it for me.
  • (4/5)
    This book is absolutely heart breaking. Buck paints a vivid picture of Chinese village life. The main character is Wang Lung, and the story follows him and his family's struggles, rises, and falls. While it was initially hard to care for Wang Lung, by the end you feel so strongly for him that the ending will make you writhe in anger. I can't wait to start "Sons" next!
  • (5/5)
    Well written story of a farmer's life in early China. Truly a classic.
  • (4/5)
    I've been wary of Pearl S. Buck for a while - her books always sounded both fascinating and depressing. I am glad I finally cracked open the cover and dug into this one, though - my preconceptions were correct, but the read is very worthwhile. Buck does a good job of presenting the Chinese culture in an almost objective way (unique for a Westerner) and her female character stand out for their nuance and realism. I definitely hope to read more of her work, although I'm not certain I will continue this trilogy.
  • (5/5)
    I loved how this book took me back through the dynamic changes China was experiencing at the beginning and through the middle of the 1900's. Buck's story telling is engaging and vivid.

    Lexile: 1530
  • (5/5)
    Set in pre-revolutionary China, The Good Earth tells the story of Wang Lung. Wang is a poor but hard working farmer who marries O-lan, a resourceful slave girl from the House of Hwang. Together they raise a family and tend the earth. Frugality and hard work pay off and eventually Wang saves enough money to buy more land. Over time they buy more land and prosper having learned to save and scrimp during times of famine. O-lan remains silent and steadfast throughout her marriage to Wang, even suffering through the humiliation brought on when Wang takes a second wife. The land has been good to Wang and encouraged by his eldest son, the extended family moves into the former House of Hwang. Despite his wealth and new position in town, Wang maintains his love for the land and does not forget where he came from. However his three sons could not be more different and have no interest in the land except for selling it. The eldest is educated and is all about conspicuous consumption; the second son handles the books and despises the waste of his eldest brother; and the third son leaves home to fight in the revolution. The China of old is no more.
  • (5/5)
    In my mid sixties, I have finally read this classic. It was never a required book in my years of high school nor college, but I am glad I have been desiring to read some classic literature now. It truly is "literature" - "written works, esp. those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit." The Good Earth was published in 1931, written of a time around the 1920s in China when the last emperor reigned in China. Pearl Buck won the Pulitzer Prize for this novel.Wang Lung is a farmer. The land is his security. The land becomes more and more important to him as he ages. He begins small, but fears, life's upheavals, social and political changes, destitution, lust and greed factor into how Wang Lung lives each new day. Wang Lung has a faithful, selfless wife, O-Lan. She has known hard times, struggling since she was a girl for she was sold to the "Great House of Hwang" as a girl slave.The Good Earth is about this couple, their country, China, and the sweeping changes of both the man and the country over his lifetime. The book traces the slow rise of Wang Lung from humble peasant farmer to great landlord. He achieves this feat by gradually adding to his lands and making enormous sacrifices to retain them through hard times. Fortunes were gained and lost, horded and stolen. Times of fear, hard living, hard work, lives filled with passion, ambitions, and rewards, times of sorrow and weakness fill this novel to overflowing. The country of China then was an agrarian country so times were different. The people lived on the land and worked it to live or they lived in the towns and cities making life there. There were the poor and the wealthy with very little in between. China certainly was not a world power as it is today.I found this to be a fine novel of its eighty-three years. It is beautifully written as the characters feel real, the emotions sadly authentic, and the life cycle ringing true no matter what country or time period we face. This family struggles falling into bad times, regains their footing, experiences poverty and wealth. There is anger between family members, love and appreciation for others. Some use others for their own gain, and sense fear and jealousy of many, be they family members or neighbors in the nearest town.So much is encompassed in this classic novel. It is a fine piece of literature.Awards: Bestselling book - both 1931 and 1932Pulitzer Prize - 1935Howells Medal - 1935Nobel Prize in Literature - 1938 (first American woman to win this award as well)Pearl S. Buck was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia. She began to publish stories and essays in the 1920s, in magazines such as The Nation, The Chinese Recorder, Asia, and The Atlantic Monthly. Her first novel, East Wind, West Wind, was published by the John Day Company in 1930. In 1931, John Day published Pearl's second novel, The Good Earth. By the time of her death in 1973, Pearl had published more than seventy books: novels, collections of stories, biography and autobiography, poetry, drama, children's literature, and translations from the Chinese. She is buried at Green Hills Farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  • (5/5)
    So much better than the movie version I saw as a teenager! There were aspects that I found hard to take as a modern American woman (calling baby girl children 'slaves' for example), but once I swallowed my indignation, I found the story compelling and at places heart-breaking.Anthony Heald did an excellent job with the narration.
  • (4/5)
    I was really into this book pretty much the entire time. books about people's love for the land draw me in quickly. I loved the protagonist at the beginning. the way he talked about the land and the fulfillment he felt when he was working on it was so nice to read about. it made me really sad to see him go in this downward spiral of accumulating more wealth and land and women and less and less happiness. the whole time i was reading the book i kept waiting for that great final scene where the protagonist was finally redeemed... and well i guess i won't tell you if that happens or not, in case you might read the book.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book for the first time in 7th grade and just finished rereading it and experience reading the book couldn't be more different. What I remembered about the book before rereading it was that it was about a man and his land with his wife and how they struggled then changed when they had money. Rereading it, it was more sad and I hated the main character in the 2nd half of the book. I also didn't remember anything after O'lan dies, I suspect in 7th grade we read a slimmed down version. I didn't enjoy the book as much after O'lan dies it felt like the rest of the book was about waiting for Wang Lung to die as well even though he wasn't that old, he just kept preparing for it. I liked the foreshadowing from the beginning about the old house, I was glad to see that the end didn't exactly copy the fall of the old house but lead you to believe it was leading that way considering the sons wanted to sell the land. The ending was well done, but felt very rushed and random the last few chapters.This is a great book to read, lots of interesting characters and it's about their lifetime and it does the time really well.
  • (3/5)
    Okay, it's come to my attention that "carpetbagger" doesn't mean what I thought it did, but what I meant to convey by using that word in my original review is that Pearl S. Buck used her quasi-insider status as the children of missionaries growing up in China (speaking Chinese and all, but only because she picked it up from her amah or whatever) to sell a putative special access to the "real" Inner Workings of the Middle Kingdom, and this book is powerful in a James Michener/Edward Rutherfurd epic sweep/small lives kind of way, but it borrows so much Biblical cadence and dips sometimes into Chinasploitation (the stuff about how women are "only slaves" and a girl child is a moderate letdown, I mean, I wasn't there and I don't doubt that it's true--I understand such attitudes persist--but my spidey sense seems to feel that Pearl S. Buck is playing it up, emphasizing it a bit more than needed both as a way of shoehorning in exposition of the "Wang Lung, as you know a girl is only a slave and not as good as a boy, but still, congratulations from me, your neighbour Ching! Thank you for the hardboiled egg" kind, and also as a way of cloaking salacious exoticism in realism, of course). This still makes it a fairly enjoyable light realist read as long as you don't take Pearl S. Buck for the final authority on China in the early 20th century or god forbid, "the Chinese" as a whole, but in this day and age, who would? (Read Lu Xun!) It also makes the introduction and reviews included here an uncomfortable experience, as the Chinese and Korean reviewers who took issue with some of Buck's depiction of Chinese culture and Asian mores are dismissed in sneering fashion by a consensus of snooty Ivy League professors (in tweed) and degenerate New York critics (seersucker) and also when Pearl S. Buck herself joins in to do the same (in some kind of dress that goes from neck to ankle, as I imagine her), asserting perfunctorily, since she knows the US literary establishment will back her to the hilt kneejerk fashion, that Chinese writers who quibble with her portrayal are just bourgeois reactionaries who don't want to admit their glorious civilization has such a thing as a peasantry. And granted, there is likely a grain of truth in that too; but the effortless assumption on the part of the everybody of the day that this was the Great Chinese Novel and only an American could write it really could only seem socially progressive in the context of a recent past where novelists referred to the Chinese as "celestials," inscrutable, etc.
  • (4/5)
    On June 14, 1946, I wrote: "Started 'The Good Earth. Pretty awful." On June 15 I wrote: "Finished tonight 'Good Earth,' A queer book indeed--it is so simply written, one wonders if she--Pearl Buck--can write any different."
  • (5/5)
    This book is a spell-binding classic. Written in the early 1930's, it tells of the rise and fall of a peasant farmer, Wang Lu and his family. Wang Lu comes to venerate his land and the land is both good and bad to him, depending upon the gods (seasons). He marries an ordinary peasant slave, O-Lan and they have 3 sons, a daughter, and a poor fool. (girl who is dumbfounded). Wang Lu throughout most of the story acts as a righteous husband and father. However, lust and women get the better of him and in his older age causes nothing but problems. In the end, the rich Wang Lu wants nothing more than to be buried on his precious land next to his father and O-Lan. From dust you come and from dust ye shall return.....
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this story--it was written like an extended fable.
  • (5/5)
    I was lent this book by a coworker and I had no idea what to expect. It didn't take long for me to fall in love with The Good Earth, and for the book to become unputdownable. (Is that even a word)

    I loved Buck's terse writing, it went with the characters and fitted the situation that the family lived in. Wang Lung was a touch character to really love - especially with his treatment of O Lan. However, I think he mostly just wanted his family to be hapy and get what they wanted. He wanted peace in his house, but sometimes had odd ways about trying to achieve it.

    My heart cried for Olan so many times. She was selfless and smart and loved her family in her own quiet way. I couldn't stand that Wang Lung took another woman and I really couldn't understand how a clear medical problem was left so long. Olan had a short and mostly sad life, I wanted so much more for her. It was really rather frustrating.

    When I read historical fiction it tends to be about Europe and now after reading this I feel that I might be missing a real trick here. While this is certainly not an education book, it is a book that you can learn from and I highly recomend it.
  • (5/5)
    This is a beautiful novel. The main character and the family he surrounds himself with are richly imagined and given vivid detail in an intricately described society.
  • (4/5)
    The story did keep me interested. I don't know if she used the writing style she did to convey the simplicity of Wang Lung, a poor farmer and his family or if she used the same style throughout all her books. I did find the sentence structure a bit awkward in spots so it didn't flow as smoothly as it might have, but there was enough historical reference to date the story to just before the Boxer Rebellion and through the Revolution of 1911.