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Sacred Clowns

Sacred Clowns

Escrito por Tony Hillerman

Narrado por Christian Baskous


Sacred Clowns

Escrito por Tony Hillerman

Narrado por Christian Baskous

valoraciones:
4/5 (23 valoraciones)
Longitud:
8 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 4, 2013
ISBN:
9780062284822
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

First there was the trouble at Saint Boneventure boarding school. A teacher is dead, a boy is missing, and a council woman has put a lot of pressure on Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn and Officer Jim Chee to find her grandson. Sitting on a rooftop watching sacred clowns perform their antics in a Pueblo ceremony, Chee spots the boy. Then, suddenly, the crowd is in commotion. One of the clowns has been savagely murdered. Without a single clue, Chee and Leaphorn must follow a serpentine trail through the Indian clans and nations, seeking the thread that links two brutal murders, a missing teenager, a band of lobbyists trying to put a toxic dump site on Pueblo land, and an invaluable memento given to the tribes by Abraham Lincoln in a fast-paced, flawless mystery that is Hillerman at his lyrical, evocative, spellbinding best.

Performed by Gil Silverbird

Editorial:
Publicado:
Jun 4, 2013
ISBN:
9780062284822
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

TONY HILLERMAN served as president of the Mystery Writers of America and received the Edgar and Grand Master Awards. His other honors include the Center for the American Indian’s Ambassador Award, the Spur Award for Best Western Novel, and the Navajo Tribal Council Special Friend of the Dineh award. A native of Oklahoma, Tony Hillerman lived in Albuquerque, New Mexico, until his death in 2008.

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4.2
23 valoraciones / 12 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    Sacred Clowns examines both the Navajo and Hopi cultural and religeons, steeping the murder mystery in a rich cultural tapestry that Hillerman was known for. As always, the story involves the human elements of both Chee and Leaphorn, their love lives and their personal struggles. This has it all.. mystery, politics, history, intrigue, and yes, two murders to solve.
  • (4/5)
    Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee investigate two seemingly unrelated murders: one of a high-school shop teacher on the Navajo Reservation, and the other of a "sacred clown" in the religious traditions of the Tano tribe. The working relationship between Leaphorn and Chee is much improved in this outing, although readers who prefer less personal romance mushy-mush and more mystery wham-bam may be disappointed.
  • (4/5)
    This is a re-read for me and still one of the best Hillerman's. I am fully engaged by the novel's balance of suspense, action, and mystery embedded in tribal customs. An irritating flaw in the plot for me is the angst that Chee has in his interactions with Janet Pete. I find that relationship which persists through several of the novels utterly tedious. As ever, the author seems intimately connected to the land and the people of the American southwest.
  • (4/5)
    Always enjoy Hillerman's books. I find all of the Indian culture information very interesting and the stories are entertaining.
  • (3/5)
    Sacred Clowns examines the Navajo, pueblo and Hopi cultural and religions.There's a hit and run to solve and our heroes get stuck in politics. In the end, all the unrelated cases come together and it all works out--the bad guys are caught. It's fun to watch the unfamiliar logic work itself to the ending. The characters and the color are the best parts of this book as they wrestle with personal issues. Next Hillerman?
  • (4/5)
    My first Tony Hillerman mystery. We took it along with us on our trip to New Mexico at the suggestion of some book blogger friends. It was a great suggestion. It took a bit for me to get into the story and I never did really figure it out, but it was filled with wonderful Native American characters and it had just a bit of romance and it was full of little bits of Native American information. Yes. Delightful.
  • (5/5)
    Joe Leaphorn asked Jim Chee to find a runaway schoolkid. During this investigation, he is on the scene of a murder during a Tano ceremony. This murder had similar characteristics to another murder, but they couldn’t be related. Of course all three threads tie together in a fascinating story.Side stories include a hit and run accident. A relationship between Jim Chee and Janet Pete in which Jim has trouble resolving a possible clan violation in their seeing each other. At the same time, Joe Leaphorn is planning a trip to China with Louisa Bourebonette.Tony Hillerman gives the reader excellent insights into the Navajo culture, especially in the way that Jim Chee resolves his personal issues. Through his investigations, we also get a glimpse into the Tano culture, a branch of the Pueblo tribes.The book is a very good read, it keeps moving forward and has interesting developments in the mysteries.
  • (4/5)
    Jim Chee has joined Joe Leaphorn as his assistant, still not a sergeant, but he has to solve a hit-and-run to get it. We learn a little (not much) about the Tano tribe, part of the larger Pueblo group in this episode. Besides the hit-and-run to solve, there are a few murders connected to the Tano celebration that opens the book and gives us the title. Maybe more important is the developments of the relationships between Jim Chee and Janet Pete, and between Joe Leaphorn and Louisa Bourebonette.I realized, looking for the spelling of names in the text, that Hillerman uses the women's first names in the narrative way before he uses the men's first names. Chee is always Chee except in dialog, but Janet is Janet almost immediately. It doesn't ruffle me. Just noticing.Anyway, a good mystery in the series, and I liked the fact that we are finally getting Leaphorn and Chee together (see, even I do it). 4 stars.
  • (4/5)
    Mr. Hillerman leaves his two main characters, uncharacteristically, in happy personal places at the close of this complicated mystery. Another nice development is watching the beginning of Leaphorn & Chee working together professionally on purpose, instead of by coincidence. The beginnings of the friendship that I remembered begin here.
  • (4/5)
    Author's Note: ..."Tano is not a Hopi village and the descriptions in this book do not represent Hopi religious activities." Navajo Tribal Police Officers Chee and Lieutenant Leaphorn work, uneasily, together to solve a killing at the mission school and then murder strikes at Tano, seemingly outside their jurisdiction. But the two killings seem to be related with the odd behavior of a runaway student. But nothing is what it seems.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first introduction to Hillerman and I'm glad I made the leap.A fascinating look at Native American culture.I also enjoyed the protagonist--caught between modern Americanism and ancient traditions--quite well.
  • (4/5)
    Good mystery. Mr. Hillerman writes with a nice balance of suspense, action, mystery and romance. His characters are very human and understandable. These stories are also illuminating about the Southwest culture.