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Popol Vuh

Popol Vuh

Publicado por YOYO USA Audio

Narrado por Yadira Sanchez


Popol Vuh

Publicado por YOYO USA Audio

Narrado por Yadira Sanchez

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (198 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2008
ISBN:
9781611554298
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Popol Vuh es una recopilación de narraciones mítico-históricos del reino del Posclásico K'iche 'del altiplano occidental de Guatemala. El título se traduce como "Libro de la Comunidad", "Libro del Consejo", o más literalmente como "Libro del Pueblo". Características prominentes Popol Vuh son su mito de la creación, su sugerencia diluviano, sus cuentos épicos de la Hunahpú e Ixbalanqué héroes gemelos, y sus genealogías. El mito comienza con las hazañas de los antepasados ??antropomorfas y concluye con una genealogía de reinado, tal vez como una afirmación de la regla de derecho divino.

Al igual que con otros textos (por ejemplo, el Chilam Balam), una gran cantidad de significados Popol Vuh radica en la escasez de los primeros relatos que tratan con las mitologías mesoamericanas. Supervivencia fortuito Popol Vuh es atribuible a los españoles del siglo 18 fraile dominico Francisco Ximénez.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2008
ISBN:
9781611554298
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor



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Lo que piensa la gente sobre Popol Vuh

3.4
198 valoraciones / 15 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    The Popol Vuh is a grand mytho-historical cycle, a reflection of an oral history, as told by the K’iche’, one branch of the Mayan peoples. The cycle starts with a creation myth and then continues with the Gods’ repeated failures to create humans, a series of Trickster Twins and their exploits among the Gods and in the underworld of Xibalba, the eventual creation of humans, and an increasingly historical listing of Mayan and allied communities and leaders, down to the eventual Conquest by the Spanish. For anyone familiar with other grand mythological cycles (Greek, Norse, Hebrew), these stories follow a familiar pattern: a deep time that is highly allegorical and full of symbolism and larger-than-life heroes, and that becomes progressively anchored in history as the material approaches the present. As such the Popol Vuh reads like a distinctively Native-American variation on a familiar theme: a standardized history of the people, whose cultural practices have roots in deep time and the forces that shape the universe. Good stuff! The edition I read was prepared and translated by Dennis Tedlock, and it is doubtlessly awe-inspiring. While the text is presented as a smooth, nicely-flowing narrative, the endnotes (whose pagecount surpasses that of the actual Popol Vuh) make apparent the translation difficulties and the cultural references, and provide insight in many of these items’ history in previous editions. Tedlock defends his editorial choices, compares editions and includes the necessary cultural background for an audience of laypeople and specialists. The whole thing must have been a massive undertaking, and Tedlock’s scrupulousness is admirable. An exemplary edition of a fascinating cultural narrative belonging to a civilization now conquered and largely erased.
  • (5/5)
    This was a wonderful read. Not only are these tales deeply allegorical, insightful and truthful but amusing and facinating. I read this three time and then transcribed the entire work.
  • (4/5)
    got me in the mood to see Chichen Itza. Didn't actually read it all, though.
  • (4/5)
    got me in the mood to see Chichen Itza. Didn't actually read it all, though.
  • (5/5)
    Despite what other reviewers have said, I would like to point out that this is the Christenson translation, not Tedlock (though it is based on his work). That being said, this is my preferred translation; it's clear and avoids too much translatorese. It's well annotated and generally well researched.
  • (5/5)
    this is the real thing, authentic pre-columbian mayan mythology. of course you already know that if you're reading this. if you don't know that already, get the book in any translation and check it out.