Encuentra tu próximo/a audiolibro favorito/a

Conviértete en miembro hoy y escucha gratis durante 30 días
Zora and Me

Zora and Me

Escrito por Victoria Bond y T. R. Simon

Narrado por Channie Waites


Zora and Me

Escrito por Victoria Bond y T. R. Simon

Narrado por Channie Waites

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (10 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Publicado:
Oct 12, 2010
ISBN:
9781441889621
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

When a young man's body is found by the railroad tracks, the murder and its mysterious circumstances threaten the peace and security of a small Florida town. Zora believes she knows who killed Ivory, and she isn't afraid to tell anyone who'll listen.

Whether Zora is telling the truth or stretching it, she's a riveting storyteller. Her latest tale is especially mesmerizing because it is so chillingly believable: a murderous shape-shifting gator-man-half man, half gator-prowls the marshes nearby, aching to satisfy his hunger for souls and beautiful voices. And Ivory's voice? When Ivory sang, his voice was as warm as honey and twice as sweet.

Zora enlists her best friends, Carrie and Teddy, to help prove her theory. In their search for the truth, they stumble unwittingly into an ugly web of envy and lies, deceit and betrayal. Just as unexpectedly, the three friends become the key that unlocks the mystery and the unlikely saviors of Eatonville itself.

Best friend Carrie narrates this coming-of-age story set in the hometown of American author Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960). Drawing on Hurston's stories, novels, and life, debut novelists Victoria Bond and T. R. Simon create an utterly convincing echo of a literary giant in this, the only project ever to be endorsed by the Zora Neale Hurston Trust that was not written by Hurston herself.

Publicado:
Oct 12, 2010
ISBN:
9781441889621
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor


Relacionado con Zora and Me

Audiolibros relacionados

Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre Zora and Me

3.6
10 valoraciones / 8 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Warning to parents of preteens: The book's ending does get into some of the issues around race, segregation and the taboo against Black men talking to White women. After reading it, my 10-year-old daughter asked if I had read it and said that there were some parts that made no sense to her. I finally picked it up and read it last night and now understand why the denouement would be confusing to most 21st century tweens.
  • (4/5)
    Engaging and interesting historical novel that speculates on the childhood of Zora Neale Hurston.
  • (4/5)
    The book is about Zora and her friends Teddy and Carrie, exploring the murder of Ivory and trying to prove that it was done by Mr. Pendir who is able to turn himself into a gator. The story is written in a wonderful way, interesting and exciting. I could not stop reading that book, because I wanted to find out who had killed Ivory. Through the first-person narration, the reader gets to know about the feelings of at least one person. It shows the differences of being black or white and that you had to decide to which racial group you belong to. But there are also friendships among whites and black. The book tells in parts the character of famous author Zora Neale Hurston, who was not born in Eatonville, but moved there at an early age. There are many character straits that are the same. I can just recommend that book. Regarding the book from a teacher`s viewpoint, I would not read that book in class (with English learners), because it would be to difficult to understand the language, even though in High School.
  • (3/5)
    This book is set in the old south. I lived near Eatonville, so I was excited to read this book. This is an excellent story with action and suspense. It is authentic historical fiction, therefore the "N" word is used. Shocking to the senses.
  • (4/5)
    Another audio-read courtesy of World Book Night and audiobooks.com. My only familiarity with Zora Neale Hurston prior to this was via Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, I am a lover of Southern literature, Southern writers, tall tales, and the art of story telling. This book was a wonderful interlude on a recent car journey, which brought the town of Eatonville, Florida, and the inhabitants there, clearly alive in my mind.
  • (3/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    The moment I finished reading this novel I immediately logged onto my LT account and gave it five stars. A couple days later I decided to reduce it to two-and-a-half but then reconsidered and gave it three. Why do I have these mixed reactions about ZORA AND ME?It's a charming story, and anyone who loves Hurston will definitely be drawn to ZORA AND ME. For myself personally, I respect Hurston but my real love is for Nella Larsen, so while I found ZORA AND ME a charming book, it's not something I absolutely adored. Nevertheless, based on charm, I initially gave it five stars.Then I started thinking about its target audience, elementary and middle-school age. Even advanced readers at that age are not likely to know Zora Neale Hurston, nor are very many of them likely to go on to read her until they are a few years older. So now I assess ZORA AND ME based simply upon the story itself, as it will be read by the target audience who have no idea of who Zora Neale Hurston was.Something about this novel's conclusion gives me a real feeling of discomfort. The novel climaxes with Zora serving in an intermediary role between a good White man and a good Black man, these two men then acting separately but equally to resolve the conflict in their communities. Yes, that's exactly what I mean, SEPARATELY BUT EQUALLY, and it's a solution that is presented as commendable.For Hurston herself, growing up in Eatonville, Florida, was probably the best thing that could have happened to her in the Jim Crow era, and "separate but equal" may have worked benefits in her own individual case and in the case of Black-controlled Eatonville as a whole, at least in contrast with the severities of Jim Crow rule. Still, I doubt that very many adults will want to present "separate but equal" as a positive good, and I have the uncomfortable feeling that the conclusion of ZORA AND ME does precisely that. It may also be a biographically apt depiction of Hurston herself, considering her own conservative (or perhaps more precisely, libertarian) politics, but this is still a conclusion that many adults might have reservations about in presenting as an affirmative good to young readers, at least where the issue of "separate but equal" is concerned.All in all, ZORA AND ME is a charming story, but it's one that an adult should read carefully before encouraging a child to read it, and the adult should be available to the child for any questions the child might have. The "separate but equal" conclusion makes me uncomfortable with this as a children's book.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (3/5)
    I have no idea who the audience is for this book, but there are passages I could definitely savor over and over.
  • (4/5)
    Last year, I read a great biography about Zora Neale Hurston by Valerie Boyd, so I was looking forward to reading this young adult novel with Zora as a young child. Fourth graders, Zora and her best friends, Carrie and Teddy, search for the truth when a turpentine worker’s body is found dead and beheaded on the railroad tracks. The book is told from Carrie’s point of view; hence, the “Me” in the title. The action takes place in Zora Neale Hurston’s hometown of Eatonville, Florida.I can see why this book was endorsed by the Zora Neale Hurston Trust (the only project to be given such an honor, not by Hurston herself). Bond and Simon uncannily capture the spirit of Hurston through the young Zora. Zora displays a knack for tall tales, as she convinces the other schoolchildren there’s a gator-man (half-man, half-gator) in their community. If you have read Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, then you will recognize Joe Clarke’s store with the men whiling away the day on the front porch. I love how the authors pay attention to the smallest details, for example, that there were only 45 states at the time.The authors brillantly capture Hurston’s traveling spirit and natural curiosity in little Zora. This magical story is a must read for Hurston fans.Zora and Me has been nominated for the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award and won the 2011 Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award.