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Another Piece of My Heart: A Novel

Another Piece of My Heart: A Novel

Escrito por Jane Green

Narrado por Jane Green


Another Piece of My Heart: A Novel

Escrito por Jane Green

Narrado por Jane Green

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (26 valoraciones)
Longitud:
13 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Mar 13, 2012
ISBN:
9781427214744
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

From the New York Times bestselling author of Jemima J, and The Beach House, comes Jane Green's most emotional and powerful novel yet: a story that explores the complications of a woman marrying into a ready-made family, and the true meaning of motherhood.

Andi has spent much of her adult life looking for the perfect man, and at thirty-seven, she's finally found him.

Ethan—divorced with two daughters, Emily and Sophia—is a devoted father and even better husband.

Always hoping one day she would be a mother, Andi embraces the girls like they were her own. But in Emily's eyes, Andi is an obstacle to her father's love, and Emily will do whatever it takes to break her down. When the dynamics between the two escalate, they threaten everything Andi believes about love, family, and motherhood—leaving both women standing at a crossroad in their lives...and in their hearts.

Another Piece of My Heart is a novel that illuminates the nuances and truths about relationships and is Jane Green at her absolute best.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Mar 13, 2012
ISBN:
9781427214744
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

A former feature writer for the Daily Express, Jane Green took a leap of faith when she left in 1996 to freelance and work on her book. She is now the bestselling author of numerous novels including Jemima J, The Beach House, and Falling. Jane lives in Connecticut with her husband and their blended family of six children.

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Lo que piensa la gente sobre Another Piece of My Heart

3.5
26 valoraciones / 30 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Jane Green is a great story teller. This book sucks you into the lives of this family, which could be your neighbor. Makes you feel for all parties involved. Very good book
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book mainly because it was real. Most of us have experienced similar situations at some time in their lives. I would label this book as chick lit, but without the usually fluff and fairy tale feel.
  • (3/5)
    really good book about a mom starting over
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book mainly because it was real. Most of us have experienced similar situations at some time in their lives. I would label this book as chick lit, but without the usually fluff and fairy tale feel.
  • (5/5)
    I was listening to the audio of this at the same time I was reading Tempting Fate. I loved the fact that Jane Green was actually the reader and she was perfect in her first attempt! There was an interview with her at the end which is not to be missed!!! She has pieces of her books that reappear in other books but her characters have completely different lives so it works beautifully. YES, I agree that it's hard to like everyone of the characters in a book---just as it is in real life---but it does make for a great novel!
  • (5/5)
    Can't get enough of this author! Everything she writes is wonderful!
  • (3/5)
    When Andi married Ethan she became the step-mother of two girls- Sophia and Emily. The younger Sophia takes to Andi well, and is everything Andi wanted in a daughter besides being biologically hers, Emily on the other hand does not. Between Andi wanting to give birth to a child, Emily wanting Andi gone and her own ever-increasing drama, neither the family nor marriage is stable.There is quite a bit of dialog in this book, and Green does a great job of making it sound realistic. It’s a pretty simple book to read, and the concept of marrying into a partially-complete family is rather interesting.The first chunk of the book was exclusively about Andi, and it was a bit much. I didn’t particularly like her character until towards the end, as in the beginning she’s lacking a backbone, is extremely self-involved, and it’s always about Andi’s problems. She talks about how Ethan’s this incredible husband, but we don’t see him in a positive light until near the end of the book. Though Green’s main characters aren’t very likable, one can see their motivations and reasoning. After the first chunk of Andi, the narrative switched often between first person for Emily, and third person for all the other main characters. Perhaps because of taking on all of the main characters’ points of view the whole book comes off as much more telling than showing. Overall the story was a little too easy to follow and predictable for my taste, and it felt like the execution could have been much stronger.On the other hand, I did like how slowly Green built up the story so that characters were fully established before major events occurred. At the end it was easy to see how and why the characters developed. The minor characters were fairly interchangeable, but also all likable as rational good-advice givers. The book felt much like a realistic soap opera; things often go very right and very wrong, but nothing outside the realm of reasonable probability.Nibble: “She pushes Sophia’s door open gently to see Sophia, fast asleep, the bald teddy bear that she cannot sleep without, now lying on its side, on the floor next to her bed, Sophia’s hand curled out toward it, as if she is waiting for the bear to jump back in.”I would recommend this as a light feel-good drama.I received an advanced free paper copy of this book from the First Reads program via Goodreads.
  • (2/5)
    I won this in the Goodreads First Reads giveaways.

    I have not read Ms. Green before and was excited to win this and I truly appreciate the opportunity.

    Bottom line, I didn't enjoy the story. I felt I was told what was happening rather than the story unfolding and showing me what was happening.

    Ms. Green employs third-person narratives as well as first person in different sections and
    I found this very distracting and often confusing. A number of times I was confused in the third-person sections by the pronoun "she," not knowing if the "she" was referring to Andi, the older female protag, or her stepdaughter or even her husband's first wife. It kept me from settling into the story. The young female protagonist was in first person, fitting since she is so totally self-absorbed.


    I really wanted to like this. But the story line seemed cliched and overused and the style of writing kept me from caring about any of the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Having read a few of Jane Green's novels now, I can see aspects that are similar in the storyline to many of her other books. At first I though, oh we've been here before but as I read on I found this book was different. Yes there were threads of the story lines of other books but this was the first about a blended family and the sometimes joys and often difficulties faced in parenting someone else's children. It's no picnic in real life and this is captured beautifully in this story. What made the book interesting was it was depicted in three parts. The first is solely from the view point of the step-mother Andi. Unable to have children of her own and married to a man with two daughters she is desperate to love, Andi finds parenting 13-18 year old Emily a nightmare. Emily is precocious, selfish, manipulative, and downright dislikable. Her sister Sophie who is 3 years younger is a darling and easy to love. Andi struggles to manage the abuse from Emily and Ethan, the girls father refuses to stand up to Emily. He feels guilty about the marriage breakdown and the girls being exposed to an alcoholic mother. When you hit the second part of the book the story is told from the perspectives of Emily, Janice (mother), Ethan as well as Andi. The story still flows but you get such different perspectives about what is happening to the family. The third part is still from multiple perspectives and tells of the tearing apart of the family due to Emily's actions, but we see Emily finally mature and become a decent person and the reunion of the family. Another very easy and compelling read.
  • (3/5)
    When Andi married Ethan she became the step-mother of two girls- Sophia and Emily. The younger Sophia takes to Andi well, and is everything Andi wanted in a daughter besides being biologically hers, Emily on the other hand does not. Between Andi wanting to give birth to a child, Emily wanting Andi gone and her own ever-increasing drama, neither the family nor marriage is stable.There is quite a bit of dialog in this book, and Green does a great job of making it sound realistic. It’s a pretty simple book to read, and the concept of marrying into a partially-complete family is rather interesting.The first chunk of the book was exclusively about Andi, and it was a bit much. I didn’t particularly like her character until towards the end, as in the beginning she’s lacking a backbone, is extremely self-involved, and it’s always about Andi’s problems. She talks about how Ethan’s this incredible husband, but we don’t see him in a positive light until near the end of the book. Though Green’s main characters aren’t very likable, one can see their motivations and reasoning. After the first chunk of Andi, the narrative switched often between first person for Emily, and third person for all the other main characters. Perhaps because of taking on all of the main characters’ points of view the whole book comes off as much more telling than showing. Overall the story was a little too easy to follow and predictable for my taste, and it felt like the execution could have been much stronger.On the other hand, I did like how slowly Green built up the story so that characters were fully established before major events occurred. At the end it was easy to see how and why the characters developed. The minor characters were fairly interchangeable, but also all likable as rational good-advice givers. The book felt much like a realistic soap opera; things often go very right and very wrong, but nothing outside the realm of reasonable probability.Nibble: “She pushes Sophia’s door open gently to see Sophia, fast asleep, the bald teddy bear that she cannot sleep without, now lying on its side, on the floor next to her bed, Sophia’s hand curled out toward it, as if she is waiting for the bear to jump back in.”I would recommend this as a light feel-good drama.I received an advanced free paper copy of this book from the First Reads program via Goodreads.
  • (2/5)
    I'm really not a fan of chick lit as a genre, but this had enough emotional complexity that the fantasy wasn't easy, without feeling like the drama was too contrived.
  • (2/5)
    I believe I read this book before as the scenes and plot begins to seem familiar. I enjoyed it again.
  • (3/5)
    What the book is about: This is a story of a ‘modern family’ where you have a second wife, Andi, dealing with her infertility, her marriage, and the angry teenage daughter, Emily, of her husband, Ethan, who gets caught in the middle of two of the women he loves the most in life.
    What I liked: Jane’s writing style is great, even if the story line was not really my cup of tea, she manages to hook you up from the start with the reality of her characters, and even if the story by itself is not super exciting she puts enough tension in it to make you want to turn page after page.
    What I did not like: At about half, the book becomes such a pool of darkness I was upset; it is a vortex of negativity repulsive and compelling at the same time. The life of the teenage daughter disgusted me so much I wanted to close the book, or shut off the e-reader, for good. It was too dark, and frighteningly believable. I hope teenagers don’t really live like that, and behave so recklessly with no respect for themselves and their bodies. It was disturbing I think, not a light read for sure. You have alcoholism, drugs, emotional abuse. It is very hard to empathize with Emily for most of the book. The author gives you Andi’s perspective first, for about a third of the book, and by the time she moves into Emily’s you already hate her. Even by writing about Emily in the first person, the rest of the book is in third person, she didn’t manage to make me sympathize with her.
  • (2/5)
    I won this as part of the Goodreads First Read program.

    This is the story of a blended family, and while I have enjoyed Jane Green books in the past...this one wasn't that great to me.

    Synopsis: "Andi has spent much of her adult life looking for the perfect man, and at thirty-seven, she's finally found him. Ethan--divorced with two daughters, Emily and Sophia--is a devoted father and even better husband. Always hoping one day she would be a mother, Andi embraces the girls like they were her own. But in Emily’s eyes, Andi is an obstacle to her father’s love, and Emily will do whatever it takes to break her down. When the dynamics between the two escalate, they threaten everything Andi believes about love, family, and motherhood—leaving both women standing at a crossroad in their lives…and in their hearts."

    While I really liked all the characters and felt the story was a good one, I just couldn't get into it for some reason. It just felt really flat to me. This was a quick read, and is sure to delight more hardcore fans of Jane Green, but it was overall very meh for me.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first experience with Green and I wasn't really sure what to expect. Our book club won copies of this book and when I was judging the book by it's cover, which I admit to doing quite often, I figured it would be a sappy love story. Well I can tell you it was far from that.The book is basically written in two parts. The first half being told by Andi as she struggles with the troubles of being a stepmother to a young girl that wants nothing to do with her. Emily is rude and belligerent most of the time, making it hard for Andi to continue reaching out to her. It becomes more difficult when her husband doesn't support her, but always turns to his daughter at any sign of turmoil. I definitely understood her frustrations, but by the end of this part it almost took on a whiny tone making me thankful we were done with that stuff.The second half of the book was told from several perspectives, including the angry, young Emily. We learn what makes her so angry inside and watch her as she makes wrong decisions that will follow her throughout her life. We see a part of Emily that makes us want to slap her silly, but we are also lucky enough to watch her accept the cards that life has given her as she develops into a confident young woman.Families can be messy business, especially when divorce and stepparents are involved. I think Green did a great job of creating a realistic situation by not holding back any of the gritty nastiness that comes up in life. Even though most of the gals in my book club didn't enjoy this one as much as I did, it did make for a great evening of discussion. With themes of love, forgiveness, and family this is a great book for personal leisure or as a book club selection. I don't hesitate in recommending this novel.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book very much.
  • (4/5)
    I won this book and finally decided to read it. I found it was a book that could make your emotions switch throughout especially if you have been in the same situation. I actually found it to be a good to read book and would love to read some more of Jane's books.
  • (2/5)
    I won this in the Goodreads First Reads giveaways.

    I have not read Ms. Green before and was excited to win this and I truly appreciate the opportunity.

    Bottom line, I didn't enjoy the story. I felt I was told what was happening rather than the story unfolding and showing me what was happening.

    Ms. Green employs third-person narratives as well as first person in different sections and
    I found this very distracting and often confusing. A number of times I was confused in the third-person sections by the pronoun "she," not knowing if the "she" was referring to Andi, the older female protag, or her stepdaughter or even her husband's first wife. It kept me from settling into the story. The young female protagonist was in first person, fitting since she is so totally self-absorbed.


    I really wanted to like this. But the story line seemed cliched and overused and the style of writing kept me from caring about any of the characters.
  • (2/5)
    I won this in the Goodreads First Reads giveaways.

    I have not read Ms. Green before and was excited to win this and I truly appreciate the opportunity.

    Bottom line, I didn't enjoy the story. I felt I was told what was happening rather than the story unfolding and showing me what was happening.

    Ms. Green employs third-person narratives as well as first person in different sections and
    I found this very distracting and often confusing. A number of times I was confused in the third-person sections by the pronoun "she," not knowing if the "she" was referring to Andi, the older female protag, or her stepdaughter or even her husband's first wife. It kept me from settling into the story. The young female protagonist was in first person, fitting since she is so totally self-absorbed.


    I really wanted to like this. But the story line seemed cliched and overused and the style of writing kept me from caring about any of the characters.
  • (5/5)
    I was immediately pulled into the storyline. Today, it is very common for children to belong to blended families. Providing a glimpse into the story of one familly that is dealing with the effects of alcohol, drugs, teen issues, infertility, adoption, and trying to stay together. Told through the perspective of the step-mother, biological mother, teenager, and author, the reader is able to get a better understanding behind each character’s thoughts, behaviors, and motivations.Jane Green does a remarkable job at keeping the storyline authentic, as she covers real life issues, in a fast paced story. The story doesn’t seem bogged down or too water downed. There were times where it was difficult to understand and like some of the characters. However, Jane Green then shows the individual perspective of that particular character, and the reader soon can empathize with her, too.Reading from Andi’s perspective, the reader is able to truly understand her desire to have children, feel her pain each month that she finds out she isn’t pregnant, and feel her struggles as she tries to make peace with the oldest teen, Emily. However, Emily appears as this rebellious teen. As a reader, I could sense the anger and understand her frustration as she tries to keep the family together, be a wife and mother to her husband’s children, and struggles with her own issues of fertility. However, Emily often argues with her, is dismissive towards her and the family, appears to be a manipulator, and just an overall rebellious teen. Reading from Emily’s perspective gave the reader an opportunity to understand her motives, the struggle she has of dealing with an alcoholic mother, trying to fit in at school, feeling her father doesn’t listen to her, and seeing Andi as fake and wanting her father and younger sister without her being a part of the family.The family dynamics are truly realistic and it’s a story that gives a well rounded view of a blended family and it’s issues.I highly suggest this book to those who love contemporary fiction, reading about families, enjoy books told through multiple point of views, and deal with complex issues that aren’t always so black and white.
  • (2/5)
    Another Piece of my Heart by Jane GreenAfter a really rocky start – bad grammar, faulty time line, characters that change personality with the page numbers – Another Piece of My Heart finally finds a real story line by about page 100. A teenager who is selfish and troubled loses her grasp on her family’s love by her parent’s divorce, her mother’s alcoholism and her father’s remarriage. Emily’s alcohol abuse, drug use, promiscuity and, finally, teen pregnancy nearly cause a permanent breach in the family. I’m not going to tell you that at page 101 it suddenly becomes great literature – it doesn’t – but it is an acceptable chick lit book good for a few mindless days of reading. You will likely figure out the ending (by page 120) but if you are looking for an emotional love story about a marriage with teens and drama, you will like Another Piece of My Heart.
  • (3/5)
    I am not into chick lit. So the fact that this book, even though it reads like something you'd see on Lifetime, sucked me in so completely is appalling. It's basically about a woman married to a divorced man with 2 girls. Ex is an alcoholic and kids spend much of their time with dad. 2nd wife is desperate for her own child but she is (dun dun DUN!!) perimenopausal and can't conceive. She gets along with younger (and perfect in every way) daughter but has a constant struggle with older kid (moody, self-destructive, your basic teenage bitch). I disliked most of the characters and spent the majority of my listening time making snide remarks about them. I found the dialogue between the characters to be repetitive to the point of wanting to tear my ears off. Yes. I know. Emo goth kid hates step-mom. Every bad thing that was, is and will happen on earth is step-mom's fault. STFU. And yes, I know. Step-mom tries soooooo hard to get along with emo goth girl. Since dad refuses to get involved and wants the two of them to "work it out"... WHY HAVEN'T YOU EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT THERAPY FOR THE LITTLE WITCH? (etcetera, etcetera)But all the while I was grumbling, I hate to admit that I wanted to know how it was all going to turn out. I had to know. And it did all come together nicely at the very end. Would I recommend it? Dunno. Maybe to a very specific audience.
  • (3/5)
    i enjoyed this book evn though it was predictable. It was about a blended family. The first part of the book was told from the perspective of Andi, the step mother who desperately wants to have a baby of her own. The second part is told from the perspective of the teenage stepdaughter who becomes pregnant.
  • (3/5)
    The first part of this book is told with third person narration from Andi's point of view. Her marriage to Ethan is basically perfect except when it comes to dealing with Ethan's spoiled seventeen-year old daughter Emily. Emily's behavior is abhorrent; she throws tantrums like a two-year old child because she is jealous of the attention that Ethan shows to Andi. Ethan feels so guilty about divorcing Emily's mother and not spending enough time with Emily that he lets her get away with murder. I actually felt really stressed out reading about Ethan and how he dealt with Emily. I wanted to reach in and shake Ethan and tell him to grow a pair!About a third of the way in, the narration switches to first person from Emily's point of view. I think this is done to help the reader generate some sympathy for Emily because up until that point I had none. It does help but Emily is still so selfish that it's really hard to feel bad for her. Also, I had to wonder if a seventeen year old was capable of being as introspective as Emily is at times. From this point on the narration switches back and forth between third person Andi and first person Emily. It sounds strange but it worked for the most part.Emily makes a huge mistake (I can't say what without spoiling the story) that impacts her whole family and puts even more strain on Andi and Ethan's marriage. This book and the relationships between its characters were so tense and strained that I felt tense just reading it. It could have used a lighter sub-plot or something to take some of the pressure off. It did seem to be a genuine portrayal of the stresses involved in a blended family though.Just as with every other Jane Green novel I've read, the editor seemed to make no effort to help Green with her American characters' dialogue. The characters in this book are all American, living in California but speak like Brits a lot of time - saying things like "proper" and "have a go". I guess I should come to expect this since this is the third Jane Green book I've read and the other two have had the same problem. It still bugs me though.I listened to the audio version of this book which was narrated by the author herself. I thought this was a really odd choice because Jane Green is British. I think that a book that takes place in America should be read by a narrator with an American accent, just like a book that takes place in England should be read by a narrator with a British accent. Green's narration gave all of the American characters British accents and she didn't vary her voice between characters much at all. It was very distracting. She also read at a very slow and dramatic pace which I think added to the stress of reading the book. It was filled with enough natural tension that it didn't need a dramatic narration.This was not the best Jane Green I've read. I think her die-hard fans will probably like it but if you are new to her I think you should pick a different book of hers to start with.
  • (3/5)
    I really liked the premise of this book but ultimately I found much of it lacking. I couldn't figure out why Ethan was considered such a good husband. I get that he was torn between his wife and his daughter but his daughter's behavior was ridiculous.
  • (3/5)
    Although Green's writing and subject matter is usually interesting and entertaining, this was not the novel for me. Blended families, snotty teenager, husband, who is said to be perfect but does not stick up for his wife, and a wife who always seems to be the victim was way to much drama for this reader. Although a different prospective is gained, somewhat by the end when we hear from the teenager herself, ultimately this was way to late to redeem this book for me.
  • (3/5)
    This was a very uneven “read” for me. A lot of the story was told through flashbacks that really seemed to slow the pace. The first part of the story was told entirely from Andi’s POV (third person), but after that, is would switch between her, her husband, her husband’s ex-wife, and her oldest stepdaughter, Emily (and her narratives were in first person). Also, the audio book was read by the author who would put pauses in awkward spots and it took some time getting used to hearing. When the story was in a forward motion, I did enjoy it, and I will definitely check out more of Green’s work.
  • (4/5)
    This is a book about blended families and the tension between stepmothers and stepdaughters. As always, Green's style is casual, chatty, conversational and addictive. The stepdaughter was less charming. In fact, her character was so toxic at times that it was hard to read about her. Still, worth reading, especially for hardcore fans.
  • (4/5)
    I love Jane Green. Her books are such easy reads but still maintain complexity. Complexity is exactly what this novel delivers. The main character, Andi, is caught in a rough situation. Her husband, Ethan, has two daughters from his previous marriage. Andi embraces both girls. She longs to be a mother. She embraces the two girls even more when it turns out that Andi is unable to become pregnant herself. In addition to her fertility issues, Andi has another problem: her step-daughter Emily. No matter how she tries to show Emily that she loves her, there is no getting through to Emily. Emily chooses to see Andi as the enemy and actively tries to destroy Andi and Ethan's marriage.As if that weren't enough, at the age of 17, Emily turns up pregnant. Seven months pregnant before anyone, including Emily, knows that she is pregnant. Andi's struggle with Emily only increases. She cannot make Emily see how she cares while at the same time she is horribly envious of Emily being pregnant. And then there's Ethan. Ethan refuses to take a stand against Emily and the havoc she is causing in his marriage. How can they navigate the complex relationship challenges without destroying each other?I really couldn't put this book down. I expected to finish it much quicker than I actually did, but life got in the way of my reading. Green crafted such great characters. Andi is so sympathetic as the wife who is struggling with so many issues. Emily is sympathetic, too. I kind of wanted to hate her for all the trouble she was causing, but I just couldn't. When parts of the narrative are delivered by Emily and you get inside her head and emotions, it becomes nearly impossible to hate her. Ethan was very frustrating as a character. I just wanted him to take action already. Do something! But don't let these problems destroy you!The plot could easily have been a tired cliche, but it wasn't. There were many surprises hidden along the way, the biggest being Emily's pregnancy. Green used the great characters she had created to keep the tension and drama high, while still surprising you.I really enjoyed this novel. I highly recommend it. I also recommend any of Green's other works. I have not read a bad one yet!
  • (4/5)
    A real family drama, centering on Andi, the second wife of Ethan and stepmom to his two daughters, Emily and Sophia. While Andi is able to connect with the younger daughter, Sophia, her relationship with the older girl, Emily is tumultuous. Ethan, caught in the middle, refuses to discipline Emily, afraid of losing her love. Adding fuel to the fire, the girls' mother Janice is an alcoholic who can't cope with the girls, and is resentful of Ethan's happiness.Confused and angry, seventeen year old Emily acts out in increasingly unsafe ways, until the family is shocked to discover that she is pregnant. Andi, who desperately longs for a child of her own, becomes Emily's strongest support through her pregnancy. The birth of Emily's child will push every member of this family to their limits. Will they fall apart, or pull together and learn to love each other?A galvanizing, fast read, Another Piece of My Heart is filled with heartfelt, imperfect people. They aren't always likeable, but they will remind you of real life.