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The Danger Box

The Danger Box


The Danger Box

valoraciones:
4/5 (9 valoraciones)
Longitud:
5 horas
Publicado:
Sep 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545285285
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

A boy in a small town who has a different way of seeing.
A mischievous girl who won't stay in one place.

A mysterious notebook .

A fire.

A stranger.

A death.


These are some of the things you'll find within The Danger Box, the new mystery from bestselling author Blue Balliett.
Publicado:
Sep 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545285285
Formato:
Audiolibro


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  • (5/5)
    From September 2010 SLJ:
    Gr 58Balliett's latest mystery explores the intricacies of scientific discovery. Wealthy Mr. Zip has arranged for a priceless treasure, stolen years ago, to be delivered to him. He will indulge his dream of savoring this object, and then will return it to society, a magnanimous gesture that will ensure that he is remembered as a hero. Sadly, before the treasure reaches him, Mr. Zip dies of a heart attack. When a mysterious man in possession of the box learns about this, he senses opportunity for personal gain, but before he can learn what he's transporting, his truck is stolen. Switch to our narrator, Zoomy, an engaging 12-year-old who, with pathological myopia, sees the world differently than those around him. Raised by his grandparents, he is pulled into the intrigue when his absent and alcoholic father makes a brief reappearance in his life with the box. Inside, Zoomy and his grandparents find only an old notebook wrapped in a blanket. An inveterate list-maker and notebook-keeper himself, Zoomy immediately falls in love with the journal, sensing a kindred spirit in the creator. He attempts to learn more about its history as the man schemes to reclaim that which does not belong to him, and as issues of The Gas Gazette provide clues but no answers about a "mysterious soul." Balliett demonstrates how danger boxes are all around usnot just as containers of physical objects for which people will hazard a great deal, but as vehicles that expose us to risky ideas and dreams. This highly satisfying story will enlighten readers even as it inspires them to think about their own danger boxes.Kim Dare, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
  • (5/5)
    The Danger BoxBalliett, BlueAR Quiz #138721 EN FICTIONIL: MG - BL: 5.0 - AR Points 7.0AR Quiz Types: RPOkay, I encourage everyone to read this book. I can't find anything that keeps me from rating The Danger box a 5-star book. The author transports us around the world with Charles Darwin, Zoomy, Lorrol, Gas, plus Gam and Gumps.Every book is a box of ideas.Every book that shares secrets is a Danger Box.One day someone really will find what is hidden in this book. It could be you.When Buckeye Chamberlain, Zoomy's no-good, alcoholic father, drops off a box of goods with Gam and Gumps, the chase begins to find out the meaning locked inside. With the help of Lorrol, a quirky outsider just like Zoomy, they investigate the mysteries of a journal wrapped in red silk.This book reminded me of Forrest Gump, with its' homespun wisdom and slow, country feel. It took me back to growing up in the 50's and 60's, sitting on my neighbor's front porches, just talking and sipping on fresh lemonade.I really enjoyed the way the author handles the evolution/religion subject with great sensitivity. Grandma is talking about America when she says, "There are a whole mess of people who believe you can't respect Darwin's thinking AND the Bible; Can't love 'em both, that's their message. And if it's one or the other, then suddenly we have a war between science and religion. It turns into a battle with our kids bang-smack in the middle. I say, why can't a person believe in both evolution and God? It's salt and pepper. Why do they have to choose?"When Jack Nicholson says to Helen Hunt in As Good as it Gets, "You make me want to be a better man," we understand he has been inspired by her. This book touches me in the same manner. We can all do better.
  • (4/5)
    Reason for Reading: I really only read this because I had received a review copy in the mail. I don't think it would have normally appealed to me otherwise.I'm sorry it took me so long to read this book as I really enjoyed it. I love mysteries, as an adult, but don't usually read kid mysteries often except as read alouds and then I stick with tried and true authors I already know. Blue Balliett is new to me, so I haven't read her other critically acclaimed books but if this is only a sample of her work then I know I'm in for a treat reading her backlist.This was a fun, exciting mystery based on a real missing item. Mixing science, history and mystery together with real life issues such as having only one parent or being raised by grandparents this is a gripping story and mystery. Add quirky characters and humour and you get a great book. One of the fun things about the book is that it is written in short chapters that vary in length, to as short as one page. Interspersed between the chapters is a kid produced newsletter that gives details of someone's life and asks the reader to guess "who am I?" in each issue. While the mystery and side stories are entertaining, it is the two main characters that make the book. First is Zoomy, a half-black boy being raised by his white grandparents who has never met his real parents and has Pathological Myopia. He also has obsessive and anxiety issues making him a truly quirky character. When he meats his new friend she nicknames him Brain Boy. The other character is Firecracker Girl, Zoomy's nickname for her, until he learns her real name is Lorrol. Lorrol is loud, says what she wants as soon as it comes to her head and always on the go. She lives with her mother, a bad speller (just look at her name!), and doesn't even know who her father was/is. These two make a great team and are endearing characters.One small caveat. As a Christian I did have a slight issue with one of the topics, which I can't mention because of the mystery, being Catholic it wasn't that big a deal to me, as it may be to some others, but the author was pushing her opinion against a religious one and I found one of her arguments of 'truth' to be fallacious. Otherwise I am looking forward to reading Ms. Balliett's backlist and glad to have found such an exciting new-to-me author.
  • (3/5)
    I loved Blue Balliett's Chasing Vermeer, The Wright 3 and The Calder Game. So of course I was eager to read this latest book. Because my to be read list is longer than I am tall, I have recently taken to listening to books on Playaway while walking around the neighborhood. I'm a firm believer in multi-tasking.I don't know if listening to the book rather than reading it for myself made a difference, but I don't think this book is as good as the first three books.What I liked about the book: The connection to Charles Darwin and scientific inquiry. I really like it when a work of fiction inspires a reader to learn more. I don't read a great deal of non-fiction, but after listening to this book, I felt an urge to do a little research on Charles Darwin. Zoomy was a likable character and the grandparents were quite humorous.What I didn't like about the book: I found the book hard to follow. The story seemed to be all over the place. I also found the excerpts from "The Gas Gazette" to be distracting, rather than enhancing the story.Recommended for 4th grade and up.Mrs. Archer's Rating: 3 of 5.
  • (5/5)
    Zoom has grown up not knowing his father and mother. Zoom lives with grandfather and grandmother. But then one day his father, Bullseye comes to town drunk. With a mysteries crate, inside they find old blanket and a book. Will Zoom find who this diary belongs to. I recommend this book to people who like mysteries and friendship.
  • (4/5)
    A sight-impaired boy in a small town. A mischievous girl who won't stay in one place. A mysterious notebook belonging to a world-famous scientist. A fire. A stranger. A death. These are the ingredients within The Danger Box, an exciting new mystery.
  • (4/5)
    292. Mystery based on a true missing thing, how cool is that?! Love the oddball character, Zoomy, family and friends make his differences his strengthes. Love the juxtaposition of the firecracker friend.
  • (4/5)
    This, I loved. I sped through this book in a day. Those who are familiar with Balliett's series of art-inspired mysteries will find some familiar elements here, but this is a separate piece with new characters and circumstances. The narrative style and perspective might not be for everyone -- the book is told from the perspective of a boy who is legally blind and, though it is not explicitly stated in the book, mildly autistic, which may make some readers uncomfortable. I thought the unique style and perspective was wonderful -- not quite as well done as, say, Mark Haddon's in 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time', but still a great avenue for prompting the reader to look at things in a new way.And this is a book that's all about looking at things in new ways. I won't give much away here, but the history-mystery (which connects with real places and artifacts, as is typical of Balliett) is a great deal of fun. There is enough darkness and tragedy here to lend realism to the narrative, but no need to worry about younger kids being upset -- this is solidly in the children's section, more advanced than a chapter book but perhaps not quite as involved as Balliett's art series -- everything is balanced with charm and a pervading tone of security. I found the characters sweet -- but not saccharine -- and clever, with a good measure of quirkiness. Overall, very much recommended for kids, particularly those who like mystery puzzles, and for adults who want a light, quick read.