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Selections From the Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen

Selections From the Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen


Selections From the Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (12 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781939444172
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Traditional and well loved fairy tales known to many generations of children.

The stories include:
1. Princess and the Pea or The Real Princess
2. The Ugly Duckling
3. The Emperor's New Suit
4. The Fir Tree
5. The Happy Family
6. The Little Match-seller
7. The Little Mermaid
8. The Nightingale
9. The Pea Blossom
10. The Red Shoes
11. Thumbelina or Little Tiny
12. The Brave Tin Soldier
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781939444172
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Hans Christian Andersen (1805–1875) was a Danish poet and author. Born to a shoemaker and a washerwoman, Andersen worked as an actor and a tailor’s apprentice before becoming a writer. Although he wrote many plays, novels, poems, and travelogues, Andersen is best known for his fairy tales. His birthday, April 2, is celebrated as International Children’s Book Day. 

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4.3
12 valoraciones / 12 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    An "ugly duckling" is hatched and is constantly made fun of because he looks nothing like his siblings. Eventually, he runs away to find a place where he belongs. Through this journey, he discovers his true identity.
  • (4/5)
    The Ugly Duckling is a very common folktale story that has been told for many years now. It starts off with a little duck who looks a little different from the rest of the pack. None of the other ducks talk with him and made fun of him which made the little duckling feel very sad. The little duck had enough of being made fun of so he ran away which made the little duck feel depressed and alone. The ugly duckling grew up by him self but when he was finally all grown up he realized he was a swan and not a duck at all. He was a beautiful swan and found other swans that excepted him.
  • (5/5)
    The main moral of this old tale has always been, not to judge a book by the cover. This story has been told over and over. One day a ugly duckling hatches, everyone makes fun of him because he is different. He relocates himself over and over trying to figure out where he is suppose to be. It isn't until the end when he grows up and sees his own reflection that he realizes that he has grown into a beautiful swan. Now everyone envies his looks and he does fit in after all. This book could be read to students for many reasons. It teaches children that what is on the inside is more important than how someone looks. Also, it could be ready when teaching folklore.
  • (4/5)
    decent telling of a well-known story
  • (4/5)
    This book is a wonderful translation of the classic Ugly Duckling tale. The story follows the life of a young "duck" from his birth to the moment of his self-realization. All the other animals throughout this book laugh and make fun of him because he looks ugly and different from everyone else. He goes through many hardships because of his ugliness, but it all pays off when he becomes a beautiful swan. Personal Reflection: The moral of this story is very influential. Children may find it hard to understand at first, but they need to know that no matter what they may look or act like now does not allude to their future. I personally really enjoyed reading this book and looking at the realistic illustrations. They really brought this book to life.Extensions: 1. Have children do "Spot the Difference" puzzles. See who finds the most. Explain that being different isn't a bad thing. 2. Invite a guest speaker who overcame adversity to speak to the children. Examples could be a local buisness owner, senator, principal, anyone who rose to the top from the very bottom.
  • (4/5)
    The Ugly Duckling is a great children’s book. It tells about self-confidence, and persistence. The main two reasons why I liked this book was because of the writing style and characters. The writing was very clear and flowed very well, the way this was written kept the reader focused on what was to come next. Also the author used some word to compare what is “beautiful” to what is “ugly.” The characters on the other hand were very realistic. Even though they were portrayed as ducks, people in their every day life go through this feeling of being “unwanted.” This story shows how everyone can feel that way and how to overcome it. The ugly duckling was left out of a lot of things, but at the end of the story the ugly duckling turned out to be a swan which he’s now considered “King of the Swans.” He swam around with confidence now that he felt he was beautiful. The message is to always love yourself, and someone will help you find your confidence.
  • (5/5)
    Do not judge a book by its cover, for one day that book may surprise you. This classic, and still endearing story was brought to life through Andersen. The characters were very believable, and easy to form a bond with. From the moment the duckling hatched and was described as terribly big, and ugly, I felt sympathetic. Through the strong language, and vivid imagery, I immediately felt a connection to the ugly duckling. While everyone around him teased him for his appearance, the audience could see that there was more to this duckling. The storyline followed the typical traditional literature pattern, which was easy to follow. The tale even ended with a lesson that “it doesn’t matter if you are born in a duck yard as long as you are hatched from a swan’s egg.” This valuable lesson was accomplished through a simple story, but this story proves time and time again to be effective. The book does push the reader to think about tough issues, and look at social problems deeper than before.
  • (2/5)
    I did not like this book because of its language and plot, but I did enjoy the main character’s determination. Before I read this tale, I thought back to the times when I listened to this story as a child. I remembered the main idea, which was the ugly duckling turned into a swan and finally found happiness and acceptance in the world. The current version however, was extremely long and drawn out, and included unnecessary details. For instance, in the beginning paragraph it said, “The stork walking about on his long red legs chattered in the Egyptian language which he had learnt from his mother.” I felt that this detail was not necessary because it had nothing to do with the story, and only confused me as a reader. Even though the language is written as though it is telling a story, I still did not find the plot to be well paced and organized. The ugly duckling traveled to different places, and met so many different characters that it was soon hard to keep up with the story line. I did enjoy the duckling’s character because he was determined and always believed in himself. For example, the ugly duckling chose to leave his family on the farm in order to find a place that would be more accepting of him. I feel that this takes a lot of bravery especially from a young duckling; he was not kicked out of his home, but instead chose to leave on his own. I feel that the overall message of this tale is to always believe in yourself, no matter how others perceive you. Once the ugly duckling gained the courage to use his wings to fly, he began to transform into a beautiful swan. I really liked that the swan knew that he deserved to find happiness and that he worked hard for it, “He now felt glad at having suffered sorrow and trouble, because it enabled him to enjoy so much better all the pleasure and happiness around him.” Working hard will always pay off in the end.
  • (5/5)
    Summary:A duckling hatches from his egg only to find out that he looks completely different from his siblings. The duckling is bullied from his siblings and peers so he decides to leave the farm and live with wild geese. Unfortunately, the wild geese are killed off during hunting season. The duckling continues to look for a place to belong but is constantly rejected until he comes across a pond full of swans. As he looks at his reflection in the water, he realizes that he looks just like the other swans. Even some children claim that he is the most beautiful of all the swans. Personal Reaction:This is always a good story to tell children, especially at a young age. It helps explain that just because someone looks different, it’s still not right to judge them or make fun of them. It’s also a good story for those children that are different in that it tells them it’s ok to be yourself and just because someone is picking on you doesn’t mean you won’t be successful later in life. The retelling of this story was also very nice in that it went into more detail about the ducklings feelings. Classroom Extension:1) Have an open discussion about bullying. Explain why it’s wrong, what to do when you see someone being bullied and the different types of bullying. 2) Talk about the differences between ducks and swans.
  • (5/5)
    This version of The Ugly Duckling is a great retelling of the classic story, with an enriched exploration of the Ugly Duckling's feelings and experiences. The illustrations are stunning. My three children, ages 3-5, are enthralled. And because of the nuance and complexity of the story, this will continue to be a family favorite for years to come.
  • (4/5)
    Black and white watercolors with splashes of yellow in this 1969 version of "The Ugly Duckling" translated by Lillian Moore. Seems to have the complete story. Suffering is purifying.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a classic. We all know the story. The Duckling was odd from the very beginning. He grows up and has a variety of adventures only to realize at the end that he is not a duck at all...but a beautiful swan.

    This Golden book really is meant more for the parent to read to the young child. The illustrations are classic and stylish. But the print is small...And with use of words like "Fluttered" and "cackled" by the time the young reader can acknowledge what these words mean in context they wouldn't be interested in reading a story like this one.

    Still, it's a classic. I enjoy it and is why I am keeping it as one of my favorites.