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John Adams

John Adams

Escrito por David McCullough

Narrado por Edward Herrmann


John Adams

Escrito por David McCullough

Narrado por Edward Herrmann

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (129 valoraciones)
Longitud:
9 horas
Publicado:
May 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780743519045
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

In this powerful, epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life-journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often irascible, always honest Yankee patriot who spared nothing in his zeal for the American Revolution; who thought, wrote, and spoke out for the "Great Cause" come what might, who traveled far and wide in all seasons and often at extreme risk; who rose to become the second President of the United States and saved the country from blundering into an unnecessary war; who was rightly celebrated for his integrity, and regarded by some as "out of his senses"; and whose marriage to the wise and valiant Abigail Adams is one of the moving love stories in American history.
Much about John Adam's life will come as a surprise to many. His rocky relationship with friend and eventual archrival Thomas Jefferson, his courageous voyage on the frigate Boston in the winter of 1778 and his later trek over the Pyrenees are exploits few would have dared and that few listeners will ever forget.
Like his masterful, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography Truman, David McCullough's John Adams has the sweep and vitality of a great novel. This is history on a grand scale -- an audiobook about politics and war and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas. Above all, it is an enthralling, often surprising story of one of the most important and fascinating Americans who ever lived.
Publicado:
May 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780743519045
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

David McCullough has twice received the Pulitzer Prize, for Truman and John Adams, and twice received the National Book Award, for The Path Between the Seas and Mornings on Horseback. His other acclaimed books include The Johnstown Flood, The Great Bridge, Brave Companions, 1776, The Greater Journey, The American Spirit, and The Wright Brothers. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. Visit DavidMcCullough.com.

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  • (5/5)
    This admiring, comprehensive biography is must reading for any student of the American Revolution, or anyone interested in American history at all. Also, it's the best biography I've ever read.We follow Adams's career from his defense of the British soldiers in the Boston Massacre, to the two Continental Congresses, the wartime diplomatic missions, to his administration as his country's first ever Vice President, and its second President. What the masterful David McCullough also gives us are the essential roles Adams played in bringing the country into being.John Adams was vital to the selection of Washington to command the revolutionary army, to securing badly needed foreign funding during the war, along with Ben Franklin choosing Jefferson to draft the Declaration of Independence, and most impressive on an impressive list, the design of the three houses of government, the Legislative, the Judicial, and the Executive through the drafting of the Constitution.We rightfully call Washington the Father of his Country. We need to find a distinguishing nickname for Adams, like the Godfather of his Country, or the cranky old Great-Uncle of his Country. Something.I came away from the book with a very deep appreciation of Adams, obviously. So will you. This is must reading.
  • (5/5)
    Well deserves the Pulitzer prize it received.
  • (5/5)
    An excellent portrayal of our President. The HBO mini-series was extremely well done also with Paul Giamatti doing his usual outstanding work.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the book but it was a slow read for me, except for the last chapter, at which point I felt so comfortable with John Adams that I enjoyed his company.
  • (5/5)
    This is such a huge book to review, I'm not sure where to start. I thought the research was good, with the exception of some of the Thomas Jefferson bits. I am not a fan of the Jefferson as self satisfied, aristocratic, spendthrift slave owner. I won't get into the economics of inheritance, etc. here, just had to say that that particular interpretation of Jefferson irks me.I was impressed by both John and Abigail's willingness to sacrifice everything for their country. I had no idea that they spent so much time separated throughout the war and after. I had no idea Adams spent so much of the war in Europe. I really liked the excerpts from their letters and I plan to read My Dearest Friend sometime this year. Abigail was unique in her level of education combined with political understanding and her ability to advise her husband.A few things that I found interesting: political intrigue was alive and well from the beginning and the media was just as irresponsible and partisan as the politicians. I was impressed by Adams and Jefferson, that they were able to reconcile later in life and enjoy a rich renewal of friendship through their correspondence.I feel like I know a lot more about this hero of American Independence. I think his value was extremely understated throughout my years of formal education.Quotes:Abigail in 1777, while John is with the Congress in Philadelphia: "Posterity who are to reap the blessings will scarcely be able to conceive the hardships and sufferings of their ancestors.""to be honest and grateful to our allies, but to think for ourselves."arguing with Rousseau in the margins of a book: "There is no doubt that people are in the long run what the government make out of them...," Adams read in Rousseau. "The government ought to be what the people make it," he wrote in response.To a granddaughter late in his life: "You are not singular in your suspicions that you know but little...the longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think, and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know...Do justly. Love mercy. Walk humbly. This is enough... So questions and so answers your affectionate grandfather.""Griefs upon griefs! Disappointments upon disappointments. What then? This is a gay merry world notwithstanding."
  • (3/5)
    A Great book to read about Adams, The biggest thing, I learnt from him were, knowing history is important.
    Human nature doesn't change, this made him on the contrasting side with Jefferson.
    Jefferson wasn't concerned much about people's sin nature.

    Strive to do the best.
    I fell in love with his constant correspondence of letters with his wife. She was supportive of him, I hope to write letters to the one I marry, I feel letters are special.

    His marriage reflected his values. Adams was well read and taught me to be frugal.

    Virtues are more important and you ought to stand what you believe for,
    Some quotes which are in my head,

    "I will not die as an ignorant fool."
    "Never speak unkindly of anyone, speak only handsome things." - Abigail


    Have fun reading the book.
  • (5/5)
    Of the hundreds of books I have read thus far in my life, this is my favorite without question. As an American history teacher, I have an obvious bias toward a book about one of our founding fathers. However, I have read quite a few history books that were not very good and could not hold my attention. This book is written as a narrative and could hold its own as a story written simply for pleasure. It is a page-turner that is all but impossible to put down, and it gives the reader a tremendous knowledge about the time period of the American Revolution. All of the legendary characters of our country's early history are brought to life, and we learn about both the good and bad aspects of each of them. I have read this book through a few times now, and take something new from it each time. This is the perfect book to read for someone who did not like history in high school but feels that it is something they should learn about. It is also the perfect book for anyone who loves history and is looking for a good read.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent read
  • (3/5)
    McCullough praises Adams incessantly while demonizing Jefferson.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite Adams biography.
  • (4/5)
    Extensive biography of one of the framers of the Constitution, first vice president, second president, strong advocate for the Navy. Amazing to think that there was a time when the president would/could join a bucket brigade to fight a fire in the Treasury Building.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent!After having spent this past year reading much about the American Revolution and the Founding Fathers, I can say that McCullough's "John Adams" is the best by far. Part of the reason this is so is due to how human McCullough presents his subject. We get to know Adams (and his family) for the people they were; and not how they're remembered. Adams himself (along with Abigail of course) should receive much of this credit as so much of the book is based on letters he wrote.If you're interested in the period and have not read "John Adams," you're doing yourself a disservice.Another reason this book shines is its tone. Some of the books I've read are quite academic in style; but not McCullough's work. He offers an easy style that is digestible by most.
  • (5/5)
    A great biography of the second President, who sometimes is lost among Founding giants Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin. But McCullough tells the story of Adams, one of the most important figures in Independence and the following Revolution. The combination of the authors narrative and letters from Adams, Abigail Adams, Jefferson and others of the time make this biography interesting and informative.
  • (4/5)
    John Adams was a key figure in the early history of the United States. This book tells his story well.
  • (5/5)
    The Biography by which all others will be (and maybe should be) judged. A herculean effort and justifiability the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize. Simply marvelous.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book and I don't normal read historical novels.
  • (5/5)
    This book is undoubtedly one of the best books ever written on the subject of the American Revolution. It is not only a book about John Adams, but also about Abigail and John Quincy as well as Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington and how they interacted with one another. McCullough was able, by gleaning information from many diaries and correspondence between the major actors, to give us an insight into the very thoughts of the characters.I did not know a lot about John Adams going into this book, and the story of his life alone would have been extremely interesting. Adams was involved in so much of our country's early history, and because of his diligent writing and correspondence, we are able to better understand the opinions and sentiments of the time. Adams was able to capture the character of individuals in his thoroughly descriptive, sometimes humorous writings. His correspondence with Abigail shows that she too, was a woman of great knowledge and abilities, and that he often relied on her when he was making important decisions. McCullough was able to gather information and put it together in such a way as to form a fascinating story about a fascinating era in US History. It will now rank as one of my favorite history books alongside Ron Chernow's book, 'Alexander Hamilton.'
  • (4/5)
    This is my favorite general biography of John Adams. It provides a good overview of his entire life and of his character in an engaging style.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent depiction of the life and times of John Adams, as well as 18th century life. David Mccullough is one of the most exceptional historians of our time.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent! all 650 pages. All good. man of integrity, loved his family. Love McCullough's writing.
  • (5/5)
    John Adams' heroic legacy continues on to his grandson, Charles Frances Adams.As the American Ambassador to London during The Civil War,he convinced the British government to stay neutral and so prevented The Southfrom gaining desperately needed support.
  • (5/5)
    This is a starry-eyed biography of a president who has spent too many years in obscurity. David McCullough has rightly replaced John Adams in the pantheon of American Heroes and Founders, and this book and the subsequent TV miniseries have rightly re-popularized this crotchety, no holds barred, sharp tongued, quick witted, devoted husband and public servant, also known as His Rotundity.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Highly recommend. John Adams was an incredible person.
  • (5/5)
    8 Nov 12:
    This book was fantastic. I feel like Adams' life and presidency are overshadowed with the likes of men like Washington, Madison, and Jefferson (ironically, all from Virginia). But Adams is truly one of the unsung heroes of the revolution. If Jefferson was the pen behind the 'Declaration of Independence' then Adams was the voice.

    23 Oct 12:
    I hate that it's an abridged edition - alas it's all the library had. So far I'm finding the contrast between Washington (who will always be my hero) and Adams very interesting. The fact that Adams seems to have expressed many of the basic rights that were put into the Constitution long before the Constitution was ever written is amazing.

    Also interesting is the contrast between Washington's youthful desire (and many attempts) to be commissioned fully by the British Army (instead of just a colony commission). Adams on the other hand turned down a lucrative royal appointment because he disagreed so vehemently with the British on taxation without representation.

    Extraordinarily good so far.
  • (5/5)
    Thoroughly researched and full of more historical information than I will ever remember, John Adams (the man) has long been of interest to me. David McCullough paints quite the renegade for his time and I admire Adams even more for his stance on slavery. I watched "Amazing Grace" (Walden Media) recently and thought they also did a bang up job of portraying John Adams.
  • (4/5)
    Beach reading for history geeks.

    Despite not being a professional historian McCullough has a clear eye for historical detail and an almost unparalleled gift for narrative.

    Like his other books, McCullough is often in danger of slipping into hagiography. That he empathises with Adams is clear throughout the book - glorifying his triumphs and downplaying (to some degree), his failures. He never quite slips across that line however, and is able to maintain credibility as a neutral observer.

    Not a book in which the historian would find anything new or groundbreaking about Adams, nor is there any attempt to break new ground in the interpretation of events in which Adams was involved.

    Nevertheless, McCullough is an excellent writer, Adams is a worthy subject and anyone with reading time to spare (like at the beach where I read this) will not find their time wasted.
  • (5/5)
    Very well written historical biography of a man whom all Americans owe a considerable debt for the formation of the nation that all of us as citizens should be proud of.
  • (5/5)
    This book underlined for me why it is important that I have begun this project to read at least one biography of each American President. Basically, I knew nothing of John Adams other than that he was our second president. If McCullough tells the tale correctly, Adams found politics and political parties to be anathemas. How refreshing! Yet how sobering, too, to think the infighting we behold today has been with our government nearly from the beginning of our nation.Of the many factoids presented, I especially appreciated learning that it was The Netherlands which lent us money that kept our fledgling country afloat.I have to laugh at Adams' description of Quakers: he found most of them to be as "dull as beetles."
  • (4/5)
    In my review of David McCullough's "Truman", I commented that Harry Truman was probably the only president of whom I would read a 1000+ page biography. This biography of John Adams is slightly less wordy at just over 700 pages. In addition, he was probably one of the "founding fathers" of whom I knew the least and was least interested. One must be wary of the tendency of biographers to lionize their subjects. But McCullough has a very good reputation as an objective historian, and "Truman" was a warts and all biography. John Adams may have been the most important single figure of the American Revolution and formation of the country. He was the main drive for selecting George Washington to lead the military revolt against England, and for choosing Thomas Jefferson to compose the Declaration of Independence. He was chosen as our representative to France during the Revolution, when that country's support was desperately needed. During that time he worked with Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, with whom he formed a deep and lifelong friendship. Adams later became our first ambassador of the new America to England, our first vice-president, and our second president.He was instrumental in developing the standing navy. Short, rotund and unprepossessing in appearance, he aroused strong loyalties and enmities, and was somewhat betrayed by Thomas Jefferson when running for his second term of president, a race which Jefferson instead won.In many ways, Adams as portrayed here reminds me of Truman; they had similar qualities and beginnings, and both were fortunate to be married to strong and supportive women who made it possible for them to devote so much of their lives to their country. By comparison, Ben Franklin, Jefferson and particularly Alexander Hamilton do not fare so well. The first two are favorite historical figures of mine. I have lengthy biographies of both waiting to be read; I'll be interested to see if McCullough's interpretation of Franklin and Jefferson reads true in the hands of other biographers. I already knew it, but the death of both Adams and Jefferson on the same day, July 4, 1826, 50 years after the country declared its independence, was incredibly moving and was seen as an omen favorable to the future of the young America.
  • (4/5)
    This biography of Adams reveals a spritely, attractive man, a classical scholar and, generally, a pretty wise leader.His principal accomplishments were defending the British soldiers accused in the Boston Massacre; ambassador to France to arrange the cooperation that led to victory over the British at Yorktown; and arranging key loans from Holland. As President, he founded the navy as important to national defense.The book itself is not much more than a summary of the Adams papers in the Massachusetts Historical Society. It contains little if any analysis or historical context. It is nice to get to know Adams the man, but a better biography would have also shown us Adams the historical figure.(JAB)