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Friend of the Devil

Friend of the Devil

Escrito por Peter Robinson

Narrado por Simon Prebble


Friend of the Devil

Escrito por Peter Robinson

Narrado por Simon Prebble

valoraciones:
4/5 (46 valoraciones)
Longitud:
13 horas
Editorial:
Publicado:
Feb 26, 2008
ISBN:
9780061579592
Formato:
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Descripción

Two murders . . . two towns . . . two determined cops . . .

One morning in March, on the edge of a cliff overlooking the sea, a woman named Karen Drew is found in her wheelchair with her throat slit. Back in Eastvale on that same morning, in a tangle of narrow alleys behind a market square, the body of Hayley Daniels is found raped and strangled.

On loan to a sister precinct, Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot draws the first case, but she turns up nothing in Karen Drew's past that might have prompted someone to kill her. Meanwhile, in the Hayley Daniels murder, Chief Inspector Alan Banks has suspects galore.

Then a breakthrough spins Annie's case in a shocking and surprising new direction, straight toward Banks. Together they must search for two killers who could strike again at any moment, with bloody fury.

Editorial:
Publicado:
Feb 26, 2008
ISBN:
9780061579592
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor

Peter Robinson grew up in Yorkshire, and now divides his time between Richmond and Canada. Peter has written twenty-four books in the Number One Bestselling DCI Banks series as well as two collections of short stories and three standalone novels, the most recent of which is Number One bestseller BEFORE THE POISON. Peter's critically acclaimed crime novels have won numerous awards in Britain, the United States, Canada and Europe, and are published in translation all over the world. Peter's DCI Banks was a major ITV1 drama by Left Bank productions. Stephen Tompkinson (Wild at Heart, Ballykissangel) plays Inspector Banks, and Andrea Lowe (The Bill, Murphy's Law) plays DI Annie Cabbot. The first series aired in Autumn 2011 with an adaptation of FRIEND OF THE DEVIL, the second in Autumn 2012, and the third in February 2014. Peter's standalone novel BEFORE THE POISON won the IMBA's 2013 Dilys Award as well as the 2012 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel by the Crime Writers of Canada. This was Peter's sixth Arthur Ellis award. Find out more from Peter's website, www.inspectorbanks.com, or visit his Facebook page, www.facebook.com/peterrobinsonauthor.


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  • (5/5)
    Book DescriptionChief Inspector Alan Banks and Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot must work together to solve two chilling crimes in a stunning new novel by New York Times bestselling author Peter RobinsonOne morning in March, on the edge of a cliff overlooking the sea, a woman named Karen Drew is found in her wheelchair with her throat slit. Back in Eastvale on that same morning, in a tangle of narrow alleys behind a market square, the body of Hayley Daniels is found raped and strangled.Two murders . . . two towns . . .On loan to a sister precinct, Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot draws the first case. Karen Drew seems to have lived a quiet and nearly invisible life for the past seven years. Try as she might, Annie turns up nothing in the woman's past that might have prompted someone to wheel her out to the sea and to her death.Meanwhile, in the Hayley Daniels murder, Chief Inspector Alan Banks has suspects galore. Everywhere she went, the nineteen-year-old student attracted attention. Anyone could have followed her on the night she was out drinking with friends, making sure she never made it back home.Then a breakthrough spins Annie's case in a shocking and surprising new direction, straight toward Banks. Coincidence? Not in Eastvale. Banks and Annie are searching for two killers who might strike again at any moment and with bloody fury.My ReviewThis novel was about 2 separate murders that in the end came together and were linked to murders from 18 years ago. The plot had lots of twists and turns and kept the pages turning right up to the very surprising ending. I would recommend reading Aftermath and Caedmon's Song before reading this one as some of the characters were connected to the characters in those two books. I now look forward to reading the next installment in the Inspector Banks series and I highly recommend this series to those who like mystery suspense thrillers and suggest that you read them in order.
  • (4/5)
    This is the 17th book in my beloved DCI Banks series. As usual, it was well-written with a plot that moves along at a reasonably fast pace. In this book we have Banks working on a rape and murder that occurred really close to his police headquarters, and we have DI Annie Cabbott working from another police station and she's trying to find the murderer of a quadriplegic woman. Who would slit the throat of a quadriplegic woman who hasn't even been able to speak for years? Annie digs deeper and discovers a whole secret life for this victim, and the suspect pool incrases exponentially. Eventually these two separate investigations appear to be linkied somehow, so Banks and Annie work together to try to solve them both. I love Robinson's writing. He is methodical and his character development is thorough and complete. After 17 books, I have really come to like Robinson's characters. And he always winds everything up in the end and leaves no loose ends. Another good entry in this very strong series.
  • (4/5)
    A good entry in this enjoyable series, which still seems fresh and not too formulaic even though this is about book 18. Banks investigates the murder of a young woman in a warren of crooked streets, whilst Annie is seconded, investigating the murder of a paralysed woman. And both become involved in other people while still trying to negotiate their own relationship.w
  • (3/5)
    Decently written thriller, a little heavy on the f-word and sex for my taste, and it seemed as though the author was constantly talking about Banks' music. It got old quickly. Hastily sketched characters as well, but enjoyable overall.
  • (5/5)
    Once again we have two separate murder investigations going on here. In my opinion, his writing gets better with each book. So far there are currently 23 DCI Banks books out and I’m on a mission to catch up with the series. Then I can eagerly await publication of the newest book in the future.This book, Friend of the Devil, is number 17 in the series.DI Annie Cabbot has been loaned out to neighboring police force but she is in touch with Eastvale Police as the two investigations appear to relate to one another.Alan Banks is paired with obnoxious DS Kevin Templeton and one of my new favorite characters, Winsome Jackman. Winsome is a 6 foot black female detective hailing from Jamaica. You can imagine the stir she causes in the quiet Yorkshire dales since they’ve never had any ethnicity in the police force before.In Banks’ investigation we have a collage-aged drunken female who was found raped and murdered in The Maze. There are many suspects but the murderer wasn’t who I thought it would be. Great job of keeping that a mystery up until the end. I wish he had written about the murdered girl’s family again though, see them have closure.Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot’s investigation involves a wheel-chair bound woman who had her throat slit. Why would anyone want to harm a paraplegic? That is revealed, as well as a blast-from-the-past from a previous book, when they discover the murderer in this case.At the 60% mark there was a huge twist and surprise! As always what I love about Alan Banks is the dedication to the job as well as his personal life interests of literature, music and food. Reading some reviews there are folks who only want the murder investigation and have zero interest in the personal life and loves of our detectives. I like the balance of knowing who these people are when they aren’t working. It makes them more rounded characters for me.There was quite a bit of food mentioned in this book as many discussions take place in a pub. At one point Banks meet someone in a wine bar and enjoyed a good wine and baked brie with toasted baguette. Yorkshire puddings, sausages, vegetarian meals, Black Sheep ales and more.
  • (4/5)
    In this book, DI Annie Cabbot has been seconded to another division. Banks misses her as a professional colleague, and she him, and they are also perhaps rethinking their personal relationship. Banks has to investigate the rape and murder of a young woman in a downtown alley, and Cabbot the inexplicable murder of a wheelchair-bound quadriplegic. The explanation lies in one of their past cases -- therefore I'd not recommend this as your first Inspector Banks mystery, as there will be spoilers of the earlier book. But those who have been following the series will not be disappointed in this latest outing.
  • (5/5)
    You know, you just can't go wrong with Banks and Cabot. Though this one was just a bit heavy on Annie's personal demons, as always Robinson delivered a well written story - truly a non-formulaic mystery.

    I may be kinda simple, but I was mildly surprised at whodunit.

    Especially after a recent string of unsatisfying, shortcut-taking so-called mysteries, the 11 hours listening to this book was time very well spent.
  • (4/5)
    Another book in the Inspector Banks series and I enjoyed this. For most of the novel there are two stories that weave in and out of each other until they come to a climatic conclusion.

    The background to the later books in this series is the relationship between Alan Banks and Annie Cabbot continues in this book. It is the story of the characters that makes the books so enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    I liked it, but I guessed the major twists.
  • (4/5)
    quite improbable but carried me along
  • (1/5)
    I was looking forward to reading this book. I have loved the others in the series. I only go half way through this book. There were two story lines and by the middle of the book I couldn't care who the murderers were.
  • (5/5)
    This series maintains its quality. It is as satisfying as putting on a warm sweater on a winter's day. Regular readers have grown fond of Detective Chief Inspector Allan Banks and his colleagues, including Annie Cabbot. Where other who dunnit series grow tiresome and repetitive, this one is as current as the music on Banks' I-Pod shuttle. It's clear that the author loves music, and music ranging from Pentangle to rap percolates through the works. Robinson's description of the first time Banks heard Dylan as a teenager resonates. His son, in fact, has grown into a rock star. The point is that these characters evolve, as do their cases. So although you turn pages to find out who did it, you enjoy how the cases impact upon both the criminals and Banks and his crew. In addition, the writing itself is tight and propulsive.
  • (4/5)
    An enjoyable book. Two different murders turn into a single one and tie in to two mysteries in the past. I read those other mysteries a long time ago, so I was not really appreciate it. But be sure to read those before you start on this one. I like the two mysteries, but am get enjoyed by the love lives of the main characters. It can do without.
  • (4/5)
    Not one of Peter Robinson's best in my opinion. A sort of follow-on from Aftermath with the widow of the serial murderer in that book involved. I felt the book dragged and could have been 100 pages shorter. Nevertheless Robinson remains one of my favourites and there is a new love interest with Sophia, definitely a formidable rival for the omnipresent Annie.
  • (2/5)
    I borrowed this on a recommendation from a friend. The mystery itself was interesting but the writing is weighted down with far too many pop culture and self-absorbed references to types of wine, play lists on the character's MP3 players, etc., etc. It was almost to the point of feeling like written product placements throughout. Compare to Colin Dexter's Inspector Morse, whose character is fleshed out with likes and dislikes but the reader isn't beaten over the head with them.Acceptable for beach or single reading but not worth keeping on the shelf.
  • (5/5)
    In the English countryside, a young woman named Hayley Daniels is found raped and strangled in the path behind a town pub.In a neighboring town another body is found. This was a quadriplegic woman, found in her wheelchair with her throat cut.D.I. Annie Cabbott has just spent the night with a stranger she met in a bar. The amount of alcohol she drank and the man's youth are indications of the termoil Annie is feeling.Annie is placed in charge of the case of the quadriplegic and Det. Chief Inspector Alan Banks heads the investigation into Hayley's death.Peter Robinson has written a powerful, character driven novel. The two investigations parallel each other and we learn much of the history of the two officers. Theif methodical, step by step investigations are stalled until Annie finds that her victim is Luch Payne, the wife of a mass murderer. Her husband was killed as the police were closing in on him and Lucy jumped from a windown and was paralized.Annie feels that her killer might be a revenge killing from the family of one of her husband's victims.The reader learns much more thant the steps leading to the capture of the killers. We see how dealing with victims of brutal crimes can effect the lives of experienced police officers. Do they need alcohol to numb the horrors that they've seen? Can someone have a personal relationship after dealing with man's inhumanity?A well told story by Robinson who has won many literary awards including the Edgar and the Anthony.Highly Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Sunday morning brings with it the discovery of two murders, both women, one in a seedier part of the town of Eastvale, and the other in a wheelchair on a headland near Whitby.DCI Alan Banks attends the Eastvale crime scene while his former colleague DI Annie Cabbot, on loan to Eastern Area, takes on the wheelchair murder.The body of nineteen year old Hayley Daniels is discovered in the storeroom of a leather good shop in the Maze. CCTV shows Hayley entering the Maze on her own, so was her murderer waiting for her?The body in the wheelchair, on the other hand, is that of a quadraplegic. Her murderer appears to have collected her from the care facility where she has been living, taken her to the headland, and slit her throat. Annie Cabbot's search for clues to the woman's background and identity unearths a connection to an old case that both she and Banks were involved in.Annie is not handling her current situation at all well. She misses working with Banks and her search for personal reward is leading her down paths fraught with disaster. From the moment it is revealed that Banks and Cabbot are working apart, it is inevitable that their paths will cross. This does give THE FRIEND OF THE DEVIL a certain sense of predictability, although the nature of their relationship when they meet is problematic for both Banks and Cabbot. I enjoyed the expansion of the other characters including Detective Superintendent Catherine Gervaise, DS Kevin Templeton, and DC Winsome Jackman. Jackman in particular acts as a bridge between the investigations of Banks and Cabbot.THE FRIEND OF THE DEVIL is the 17th Inspector Banks novel, and Robinson shows that he still has the capacity to surprise even while plumbing new depths in the Banks/Cabbot relationship. Annie Cabbot first appeared in 1999 IN A DRY SEASON, eight books before FRIEND OF THE DEVIL. Through her, Robinson has been exploring the parameters of successful detective partnerships. It is an issue which other authors like Ruth Rendell, Reginald Hill, and Colin Dexter avoided with their male duos. The relationship between Banks and Cabbot is not that of two equals: he after all is the "boss", and he is also quite a bit older than her. Robinson asks questions about whether the relationship between male and female detective duos needs to be emotional and whether it can ever be sexual. The changing landscape of the Banks/Cabbot relationship is part of what keeps fans coming back to this series.
  • (5/5)
    Friend of the Devil is another excellent novel by Peter Robinson. It keeps you interested the whole way through, and makes you care about and understand the characters. Some shocking crimes are revisited, but the story is excellent as usual.
  • (4/5)
    Complicated murder mystery with the two detectives working separate cases that come together in the end of the book with a surprise, gruesome and violent death.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed Simon Prebble's interpretation, and I like the characters in the book. However, I do feel that the mysteries were solved by the protagonists without having given sufficient clues to the reader. It didn't leave me with an I-should-have-seen-that feeling which is the hallmark of truly great mysteries.
  • (3/5)
    i like this series-Alan Banks and Annie-enuf personal detail to be interesting and the mysteries are good too
  • (4/5)
    Friend of the Devil has one of the best opening paragraphs I've ever read for this genre and immediately I was hopeful that, yes indeed, this was going to be a great book. Unfortunately, it didn't quite live up to those hopes, but I still found it entertaining nevertheless. Two murders; two different investigations and two different lead detectives. I would recommend it, but it is definitely the type of read you really must devote yourself to great chunks of time to make sure you ingrain the characters into your memory. I dabbled with this book in small doses as life kept interrupting, and in all fairness, that really did take away from the smooth flow of the story. I kept losing track of who was who and found myself backtracking. The writing itself was good, but a little bit wordier than what was needed. I did like the lead characters and I would read another Peter Robinson book featuring them. If a varied cast of characters is Mr. Robinson's M.O., I will definitely make sure I have plenty of time to lose myself in his stories and stay in the moment with him.
  • (4/5)
    An entertaining read which ties together loose ends from not just one, but two previous novels. It's very useful in understanding the story to have read both Aftermath and stand-alone Caedmon's Song before Freind of the Devil.
  • (5/5)
    Another excellent Banks story, as usual set in and around the fictional Eastvale, but with substantive mentions of real locations in Whitby and Leeds. Di Annie Cabbott is on secondment in Whitby and her and Banks' murder cases suddenly appear to be linked. A very ingenious plot and the usual strong characterisation make you want to read to the final pages as quickly as possible.
  • (4/5)
    This is the 17th in Peter Robinson's excellent Alan Banks series. Banks is a Chief Inspector in Eastvale, a small English town not far from Leeds. The series is rather dark in tone, but one rather expects that in a murder related series. While Banks is the main character, it is something of an ensemble piece, with a number of interesting characters that grow over the course of the series. Annie Cabot is the lead female character, and it is her emotional life that is a major plot point in this particular entry in the series. Excellent series, this book is a well-done part of it.
  • (4/5)
    Overall, an intriguing read.I was excited about getting this book, because I enjoy mystery novels, and this was set in Great Britain--the locale of many excellent mysteries. I had a little trouble getting into this book, however, because of all the acronyms and names. If you're not familiar with the British police system, it takes a while to figure out which officer does what job. Also, I think too many characters were introduced at the same time in the beginning. I spent a lot of time turning pages back and forth to refresh my memory.There were also a few typos (does no one edit anymore?), which drive me crazy, but I'm probably in the minority on that issue.I liked the way the narrative alternated between the two main characters, but it should have been more clear in the very beginning that there were two different threads (maybe by using chapter titles or subtitles?).There were a couple of throw-away characters (what happened to Sophia? what was her purpose in the plot?), although they were interesting side stories.But having said all that, it was a thoroughly enjoyable read--I couldn't put it down!
  • (4/5)
    In Peter Robinson's 17th mystery starring DCI Alan Banks, Banks is investigating the murder of a young woman found strangled in a storage shed in Eastvale. Meanwhile, DI Annie Cabot is investigating the murder of a woman who was found on sitting in her wheelchair with her throat cut. For readers new to the series, Friend of the Devil isn't a great place to start because it picks up on the events of one of Robinson's previous mysteries, Aftermath. This connection works against Friend of the Devil, because while this is a good, solid mystery, it suffers in comparison to the outstanding Aftermath. The mystery is engaging, and it was interesting to catch up with several characters from a previous mystery. I was less happy with some of the development in the detectives' personal lives - Annie's treatment of a guy she's gotten involved with is appalling, and seemed out of character to me. But overall, I enjoyed the book and I will certainly stick with this consistently good series.
  • (3/5)
    Spoilers ahoy –This was my first Peter Robinson and while good, I don’t think I’ll be adding this series to my reading list. Just too many other books to read and series I’m committed to and this one didn’t grab me. It wasn’t bad though, just felt familiar. While reading it, impressions of other books and even a TV series came to me; Dalgliesh from the P.D. James novels, Jane Tennyson from the Prime Suspect TV series, Lucas Davenport from the John Sanford series. All those are police procedurals and Friend of the Devil is just as good, albeit a bit ‘scene driven’. The two cases came together in a way that was predictable, but plausible. A couple of things bothered me about how the cases were run though. Annie didn’t strike me as aggressive enough in her dealings with the lawyers who knew Karen Drew’s true identity. That kind of thing is usually like meat in front of a starving dog. A similar failing of Banks’s drew my attention as well. Much was made of The Maze and its intricacy and impossibility to police. When it was evident someone entered without being captured on CCTV, I immediately thought that there must be a connection between an entrance that is filmed and an entrance that isn’t. The buildings were ganged together and must connect somewhere. Lo and behold, that’s just what solves the case. If they had thought of it when I did, the book would have been a lot shorter.This definitely read like part of a series and a lot of detail was omitted or alluded to. It wasn’t too hard to fill in the blanks, but it was definitely noticeable. Not a bad thing if you’re into a series. I find it quite irritating to be told the same information over and over again. Characterization seemed to be thorough, if a bit clichéd. Annie kept the furthest away from outright cliché and it surprised me. Banks however, was a fair amalgam of a lot of detectives I’ve read.The constant brand name dropping of items, terms, songs etc. drove me crazy. I understand using specificity to create atmosphere and time and place, but this was just laying it on too thick. iTunes this and Google that – enough! Ten years hence it will make this book very dated. It also feels like the author is simultaneously showing off with his esoteric musical knowledge and setting up a private joke most of his readers won’t understand. I find it much more effective for my imagination to read the words laptop computer rather than MacBook. But that’s just me.Overall I liked Friend of the Devil. It just isn’t unique enough to add to my series addiction.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first Peter Robinson book, and I was very happy with what I read. The crimes within were very intriguing and kept me reading well into the night. The characters and their relationships were interesting and even though this was my first book in the series, I quickly felt as if I was with old friends. The end of the book left me a little disappointed, it works well with the entire story, but seemed as if there was more story totell. Having read this book, I will be finding and reading the previous books in the series.
  • (4/5)
    I had never read anything by Peter Robinson and quickly realized we have continuing characters here. However, that did not ruin the book for me. I found it to be well nuanced, with well-developed characters and an intricate and detailed plot. It is the story of what appears to be two separate murders. As each is investigated facts come to light that show they are actually related. As the book moves to a conclusion, I did get somewhat lost - there were a lot of names and motives that seemed to confuse me. And when we finally got to the end, the book stopped. I was a little dissatisfied at the conclusion - it needed a bit more resolution for me. I will, however, based upon this book, go back and read more Peter Robinson. I liked the police procedures and the murder mystery very much.