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Kizzy Ann Stamps

Kizzy Ann Stamps

Escrito por Jeri Watts

Narrado por Quincy Tyler Bernstine


Kizzy Ann Stamps

Escrito por Jeri Watts

Narrado por Quincy Tyler Bernstine

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (6 valoraciones)
Longitud:
3 horas
Publicado:
Aug 14, 2012
ISBN:
9781469206806
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Kizzy Ann Stamps is starting at a new school, the just-integrated public school, and she's worried. She's worried that the white students won't like her, and she's worried they'll stare at the scar that runs from the tip of her right eye to the corner of her smile-the scar a neighbor boy gave her, in a farming accident.

But now this same boy won't stop following Kizzy and Shag, her beloved border collie, everywhere they go-even when they're practicing for an upcoming herding competition. And though Kizzy and Shag have been training hard, Kizzy and her coach aren't sure they'll even let her, a black girl, enter the competition.

In this tender-and often humorous-debut novel, Kizzy Ann discovers that almost everyone has scars to bear and that with a dog at your side you can find the courage to face them head-on.

Publicado:
Aug 14, 2012
ISBN:
9781469206806
Formato:
Audiolibro


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4.5
6 valoraciones / 5 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    This was a really heartwarming read and I feel that it would fit in wonderfully while learning about African American history. I think that everyone can learn something from Kizzy Ann about staying true to yourself and fighting against the world's injustices. This story is written in a very unique way, as letters sent from Kizzy to Miss Anderson. I found this to be really charming, as it gives particular insight into the way that an African American girl may have felt during this tumultuous time in American history. However, this rhetorical technique also limits the detail included in the book. I am a person that likes books to include tons of detail so that I can really picture the plot and the characters in my head and this book didn't have that for me.
  • (5/5)
    I read this in one evening and loved Kizzy Ann's voice through her letters to Miss Anderson, her new teacher in the integrated school. Kizzy Ann is smart, plucky and warm-hearted. Her love for her dog, Shag, is a monument to friendship. I need to read this again, slowly and pensively, to glean its full import. Highly recommended for all elementary and middle school libraries.
  • (4/5)
    An enjoyable epistolary middle grade novel set in 1963-64 and featuring an endearingly charming protagonist.
  • (4/5)
    I never thought I'd write to the teacher at the white school. I don't know as I've ever thought about the white school, really, before all this integration business got started. But here I am, fixing to go there come September.
    --Chapter 1

    This historical fiction novel tells the story of integration in a small town and how a young girl sees things. Kizzy Ann Stamps is a young girl of color who doesn't really want to go to the "white school". The book is set up as letters Kizzy writes to her new teacher and once school starts, a journal. Each chapter is a letter and later a journal entry. Kizzy loves to write and enjoys telling Miss Anderson all about her and her dog Shag in her letters.

    Kizzy is very honest in her letters and expresses what she is feeling about whatever is going on in her life. As the story progresses, we see that Kizzy has a strong personality and sometimes speaks when she shouldn't and it gets her in trouble. But, Kizzy is also very smart, very determined and very resilient.

    The author writes beautifully and really captures the voice of a young black girl during the time of segregation. At least as far as I can tell, being pretty far removed from that myself. I guess what I'm saying is, Kizzy is a compelling character and she seems real. Kizzy goes through some highs and lows. She is kept from doing some things because of the color of her skin, but she does break some barriers.

    To me, this novel speaks of hope. How even though things seem set in concrete, there are always people with open minds who are willing to see the benefits of change. Of course there are those who are dead set against change, but that doesn't mean we stop trying to make life better.

    Enough preaching. Here are some quotes that I especially liked.
    I cannot believe the upside-downness of the world. One day your biggest problem is whether you feel like you can work with a man whose eyebrows are alive, and the next minute your problem is that your country's president is dead.
    How can one man dying make the whole world hush?

    He's my daddy, you know. But sometimes, I just don't know what's right. He'll do something and it feels, um, ugly or mean or something. I get mixed up then. I just don't always know what's right. You know what I mean?

    The makeup didn't bring back the old me. It wasn't the old Kizzy Ann. It was just some other girl, someone I didn't know. It was a disguise, just a disguise.

    I was not amazed at the hug from you -- I know by now that you really do love me even if you are white and I am not -- but when the crowd gasped, I thought we were in trouble.

    I looked to my friends, my friends who were there for me, there with me, this finest moment in my life. I knew that it didn't matter whether we won any place at all. For that experience, on that course, I was an equal.
    I enjoyed this book very much. Historical fiction seems to be growing on me. I used to think I didn't like this genre much. But, recently I've read several historical fiction books that touched me. It's always fun to discover something new that you enjoy.

    Recommended to:
    Readers in grades 3-5 that enjoy historical stories or stories about young girls overcoming odds.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the voice of Miss Kizzy Ann who is girl growing up in the south in 1963. She has an opportunity to go to an integrated school and decides to take it but it's really hard. She explains her life in a series of letters and journal entries. I really liked the fact that the it tells the story about what happens after integration-it wasn't just all kumbayah and holding hands. It was hard and people were still mean. I think this one would be great with some of the historical fiction of this time period, like Revolution by Deborah Wiles or Lions of Little Rock by Kristen Levine