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Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

Escrito por Kevin Henkes

Narrado por Meryl Streep


Chrysanthemum

Escrito por Kevin Henkes

Narrado por Meryl Streep

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (139 valoraciones)
Longitud:
13 minutos
Publicado:
Jan 1, 1998
ISBN:
9780545667210
Formato:
Audiolibro

Nota del editor

A joy to listen…

Narrated by Meryl Streep, this lovely story of a little mouse who learns to rise above teasing and embrace the name that sets her apart is a joy to listen to, for parents and children alike.

Descripción

She was a perfect baby, and she had a perfect name. Chrysanthemum. When she was old enough to appreciate it, Chrysanthemum loved her name. And then she started school. "I'm named after my grandmother," said Victoria. "You're named after a flower." Chrysanthemum wilted.

Life at school didn't improve. In fact, it got worse. Then the students were introduced to their music teacher, Mrs. Twinkle. Mrs. Delphinium Twinkle. And suddenly, Chrysanthemum blossomed...

Publicado:
Jan 1, 1998
ISBN:
9780545667210
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Kevin Henkes is an award-winning author and illustrator of many books for children of all ages. He received the Caldecott Medal for Kitten’s First Full Moon; Caldecott Honors for Waiting and Owen; two Newbery Honors—one for Olive’s Ocean and one for The Year of Billy Miller—and Geisel Honors for Waiting and Penny and Her Marble. His other books include Egg, Old Bear, A Good Day, Chrysanthemum, and the beloved Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. Kevin Henkes lives with his family in Madison, Wisconsin. www.kevinhenkes.com

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Lo que piensa la gente sobre Chrysanthemum

4.6
139 valoraciones / 124 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    This story is about a mouse named Chrysanthemum and because of her name she is the subject of bullying by those in her class. During the story she decides that her name is not beautiful and fitting for her. But by the end of the book with the help of her music teacher Mrs. Twinkle learns that her name is in fact beautiful and very fitting for her. This story is one that would be great to read to help students learn that they themselves are special and unique also while obtaining a very descriptive vocabulary.
  • (5/5)
    Chrysanthemum was a little mouse that loved her name until one day other friends started to make fun about it, and she felt it was not a cool name. However, a teacher named Mrs. Delphinium agreed that Chrysanthemum was a beautiful name and that just because it was long it did not have anything wrong. Then, Chrysanthemum loved her name again as much as her family, teacher, and now friends. Definitely, a book to read to experience what our names mean.
  • (5/5)
    Great book for self esteem and being your own person. Book using repetition.
  • (5/5)
    I love reading this book at the beginning of the school year with the lower grades! As we get to know one another, this is a particularly powerful story to share. This is great for the PYP theme "Who we are"
  • (4/5)
    Chrysanthemum is a girl who is teased for her name, because it is different and long. A teacher at the school makes Chrysanthemum feel welcomed and also accepted, telling her that her name is special. Teachers should always be aware of what is going on in the classroom, and should always make sure that children feel accepted and welcomed for who they are.
  • (5/5)
    Great children's picture book! This book has a great message behind it and can teach younger students a lesson.
  • (5/5)
    5starP. Preschoolers (Individual/group). Possibly toddlers, but is probably too long. Addresses going to school, teasing and self-esteem.
  • (3/5)
    This story is helpful for teaching the perspective of one who is bullied because of their name. It can be used a read-aloud and then teaching a mini-lesson about voicing one's thoughts in writer's workshop.
  • (4/5)
    I use this book to teach my student about beginning, middle and end. It was a good mentor text to use while teaching the students in Writer's Workshop. The book has a lot of detail in the story and talks about how she is feeling and what she is thinking.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! I think that with the guidance of a teacher a younger student could really take away a good point from this book. The big idea/ message I believe is mostly on not letting mean things people say keep you down. Chrysanthemum was self-conscious about her name and its length and through the book the "wilted-ness" she felt got worse and worse. With the reassurance of her *awesome* music teacher, her peers looked at her differently and finally came to the sense that Chrysanthemum wasn't such a bad name after all!Some of the language in the text had a bit of an imaginative meaning. For example when it said, "Chrysanthemum wilted" I thought this was smart! The book had just established that a Chrysanthemum was a flower and saying "Chrysanthemum wilted" could make it a good time to ask students a question like, "does anybody know what "wilted" means"? Later on, after Chrysanthemum is reassured of her name the book states, "and she bloomed" again, another word related to a flower. I thought of a classroom modeling wilting and blooming and this could help students really understand the value of being nice to one another! Along with this, the writing in this book was very engaging and I think could be easily understood by its targeted age group. With the strong correlation between what is happening in the illustrations, students would be able to easily follow along with the story being told.The illustrations definitely engage readers and help readers to sympathize with Chrysanthemum. Some pages get a little busy with the pictures but for a young reader I believe this business is perfect for them. I particularly enjoy the page with all the name tags because it allows the reader to see Chrysanthemum's name written out, and you can compare it to her classmates' names to really see the point being made.
  • (3/5)
    This is a great book for young children and has a very important lesson that all children need to learn. Chrysanthemum loves her name until she goes to school and gets made fun of and wants to change it. At the end, her teacher shows the students how great Chrysanthemum's name is and the students want their names to be those of flowers too. The book teaches students that even if something is different about someone you should not make fun of them. This is very important because bullying occurs very often in schools today. I loved the message of this book which made it great. I also loved the illustrations that were a nice pastel. The last thing I enjoyed was the main character. She was so cute and the reader could sympathize with her and she made you want to keep reading.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book for multiple reasons. To start, the writing of the book is very organized and the author, Kevin Henkes, does a great job with repetition throughout his story to show emphasis. For example, some sentences appear over and over again: "Chrysanthemum wilted. She did not think her name was absolutely perfect. She thought it was absolutely dreadful." These three lines appear multiple times throughout the story to show that Chrysanthemum is extremely unhappy with her name she once thought, and her parents think, is perfect. With this organized writing characteristic, the reader can really feel the main character's frustration with her name. I also really enjoyed the plot of the story. A story about how a child starts to hate her name because some kids teased her is easily relatable to children who have also been teased. Also, the story does a great job at describing how much Chrysanthemum ultimately loves her name and even though she was teased, she learns to accept her name and many children will learn that they should not let other kids tease them about their names and they should accept who they are no matter what. The plot is easily relatable, has conflict that ends up being resolved, and has a happy ending which children will enjoy. The main message that all students struggle with acceptance but eventually need to be comfortable with themselves is an important one to grasp but this author executes it perfectly.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great read on the first day of school! This is a great way to begin an introductory to the school year. Some students will be able to relate to a long name or not liking their name. Great for the Elementary level.
  • (4/5)
    Chrysanthemum feels she has the perfect name until she goes to school. This book covers some tough issues that children will experience in some form or fashion as they grow up. Chrysanthemum starts school with confidence and love of her name. Each day her fellow students would crush the pride she had in her name. At the end of the day, Chrysanthemum would go home to her parents who would help her rebuild the pride in her name. Ms. Twinkle, the music teacher, reveals that that she has the same name as a flower. Ms. Twinkle makes Chrysanthemum blush and the other students envious when she reveals that she will name her unborn child Chrysanthemum. With the help of her parents and teacher, Chrysanthemum made it through the difficulties of her childhood.
  • (5/5)
    I would use this story to teach problem and solution to strengthen comprehension.There is a lot of bullying that occurs in this book, and I could teach how the other students were making Chrysanthemum sad. Great book to use for the readers response portion of a reading lesson.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book about a little mouse named Chrysanthemum, who grows up loving her name, until she goes to school. The other students tease her all day long every day at school for having such a unique named. Every day, she puts up with the other mice ridiculing her for her name, and every evening, her parents give her love and support and reassure her that her name (and everything else about her) are "perfect." Finally, the music teacher tells the class that her first name is Delphinium, and that she's named after a flower, just like Chrysanthemum. Chrysanthemum feels better about her name, and all the other mice think that her name is cool.This book is a good example of family support. Chrysanthemum's parents support her through her rough start to school and they do a lot to help her. On one page, you can see her father reading a book called "A Rose by Any Other Name...Understanding Identity." It's a way of reassuring kids that even though kids at school may tease you, you have people who love and cherish you.
  • (4/5)
    Chrysanthemum is a book about not letting what others have to say get you down. In this book Chrysanthemum is bullied because of her name. In the end, she decides that she loves her name and that no one is going to take that from her. I think this book would be great for second or third graders because it has some tier two words that may be challenging, and because its message is about having confidence within yourself. I believe it would be good for children at that age to read about and to see how mean it is to make fun of someone.
  • (4/5)
    This was one of my favorite books when I was was child. I loved everything about the book especially the message and the illustrations. First, the author had incredible pictures that made me want to read the book more than once. My favorite picture in the book is Chrysanthemum on her way to her first day of school. The author drew her in bright colors and it always reminds me how I felt on my first day of school - happy as the sunshine. Second, I love the message the book has to offer. The big idea of this book is that it is okay to be different, it is what makes us unique! I related to this book because I always felt that my name was out there and I endured bullying because of it. Chrysanthemum's classmates made fun of her name until they met their music teacher who has a long name that would barely fit on her name tag. When the music teacher tells the class that she's thinking about naming her daughter Chrysanthemum, suddenly everyone in the class loves her name! This book sends a wonderful message about acceptance.
  • (5/5)
    Chrysanthemum is a story of a young girl mouse who grows up and absolutely loves her name. That is until she has to go to school. While at school Chrysanthemum is constantly bullied for having such a unique name after a flower. The children continuously bully her stating that her name is to long, it doesn't even fit on a name tag, and she's named after a flower, ew. Chrysanthemum struggles with this, but her parents constantly reassure her that her name is absolutely perfect, she doesn't think so. It isn't until a surprise visit from the music teacher, where she explains that she too has a name so long that it doesn't fit on a name tag, and is also named after a flower, Delphinium, that Chrysanthemum finally feels better about her name. This book is a good representation of bullying, family support, and acceptance.Teaching Ideas: teach children about bullying and how its bad, as well as why not to bully, also teach children about acceptance and how to love each other for how they are.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book because of the moral of the story, the adorable pictures and the vocabulary level. The story was about a mouse who was given the name Chrysanthemum and she loved it all her life until she came to school. Every made fun of her name because it was so long and different. Then she started to hate her namea nd wish she never had it. Then, a new teacher came to school who everyone loved and she had a unique flower name as well and said that she loved the name Chrysanthemum. Everyone was shocked and then they started to love her name too and wish there names were more unique. The moral of the story was to not care what other people think. If you like something, but other people don't, it's okay to be different. The story was so cute and easy to read. the pictures were adorable. I think young readers will really like this book.
  • (4/5)
    Chrysanthemum loves her name, it's perfect, that is, until she goes to school and all of the children laugh and giggle at her name. It's too long, it scarcely fits on her nametag and she's named after a flower. Throughout all the mean comments and teasing she learns to appreciate just how special and perfect her name is.
  • (4/5)
    This book was adorable. I enjoyed reading it even though at the same time it made me upset Chrysanthemum thought her name was not perfect because of some bullies. I noticed while reading how her clothes became more baggy as she became more uncomfortable and less confident in who she was and about her name. The book really showed the effects bullying has on a person and how one person can make a difference. I loved how supportive the parents were towards Chrysanthemum and her name crisis. The illustrations in the book really showed how she felt and what was going on. The overall message of the book is that your name is perfect for you and do not let others tell you different. Another message could be to not bully others.
  • (5/5)
    I LOVED this book!! I've always loved Kevin Henkes' books as a child and just remembered why! One of my favorite books as a child was "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse", which was also written by Kevin Henkes. I love his illustrations and the stories behind his mouse characters. Chrysanthemum was about a little girl who absolutely loved her name, but when she started going to school everyone would make fun of her for it. Until one day when her music teacher (who they all loved) told the class that her name was a type of flower as well. After that, Chrysanthemum became friends with her classmates and loved her name again because the teacher they all looked up to stuck up for her. It's a lovely story because it talks about the fears some children face when going to school. It's a very fun and colorful story, and I love how Kevin Henkes characters are always mice. It brought back a lot of memories for me. The illustrations were realistic and creative because he portrays the mice as real children which characteristics of humans. The plot was also organized, there was enough detail to keep you interested, but the story was simply enough for children as well.
  • (4/5)
    I think this story has a great message. The big idea is all about bullying, and how just because someone is different, doesn't make it right to make fun of them. The illustrations work well with the text, and expand on chrysanthemums emotions. The drawings are simple and the characters are easy to relate to due to their vivid expressions and actions. I like the plot and how it pushes readers to think about how unfair chrysanthemum was being treated just because of a name.
  • (5/5)
    I thought this book was absolutely adorable in every way possible. I think this book is great for children to read to gain a better understanding of how bullying and name calling can affect children. In this case Chrysanthemum was being picked on for her name by children at her school, this makes her want an entirely different name of her own. I found it very sweet of the teacher to inform her about her real name, making her feel more comfortable in her own skin. I also loved the illustrations within this book too. The illustrator has the father mouse reading hysterically titled books within the pictures, which had a bit of adult humor as well.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. I love the different characters along with their varying personalities. Chrysanthemum is a sweet little girl who has always loved her 13 lettered name, until she began school! She is bullied by children in her class, who repeatedly remind her that she is named after a flower. Her parents and teachers are very sweet, and they continue to remind Chrysanthemum that her name is absolutely perfect! I also like that the author pushes readers to think about tough issues, such as bullying, in elementary settings. I think this is a great book to read to kids to remind them that bullying is never okay.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book for many reasons including the message, the illustrations, and the writing. The main idea of this book is for one to have self-confidence even if being bullied by peers. Chrysanthemum is drug down by the mean girls in her class for having such a long name. She attempts to stay positive despite their persistent bullying and putting her down. In the end of the story she realizes that she has to be confident despite what the girls say to her. I believe the text greatly benefits from the illustrations in the book. I feel the illustrations enhance the text and add an extra element to the words of the book. For example, I love the illustration that contains a picture of each student and their name. The illustrator shows the reader that Chrysanthemum's name is so much longer in length than the rest of the class because it does not fit in the box.I also liked the writing that the author employed in this text. I enjoyed the predictable, repeated lines in the book such as, "Chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum". I also enjoyed the predictable pattern of the plot. Chrysanthemum would be excited about her name before school, dislike her name during school because her peers made fun of her name, and then like her name again after her parents consoled her. Jo, Rita, and Victoria always spoke in a predictable patter.
  • (4/5)
    One of my favorite children's book, Chrysanthemum is a great book for young readers. It teaches the reader how important it is to be who you are, and that you are perfect (including your name) just the way you are. It also is a great book to teach about bullying and why it is wrong to tease other people.My favorite thing about this book has to be the overall message, which is about being who you are and not letting other people bring you down. At the end of the book, the last page reads "she no longer thought her name was perfect, she knew it was." Through the whole story, the main character Chrysanthemum was teased because of her name. Although her parents would remind her how "absolutely-perfect" her name is, she did not believe it because of the other kids in school. However, she learned at the end that her name is perfect in every way, including the perfect name for her. Another thing I like about this book is the authors repetitiveness in his use of text. Twice in the book, the antagonist (Victoria) points out flaws in Chrysanthemum's name, such as how long it is or that she is named after a flower. Both times the teacher responds the same way, "Thank you for sharing that with us Victoria. Now put your head down." This technique is also used when Victoria returns home from school on her first and second day. She is sad that the other children make fun of her, stating that "school is no place for me." Her parents then comfort her and remind her how "absolutely perfect" her name truly is. The only thing I was not a huge fan of was the illustrations. Maybe it was I am an adult and the book was made for children, but the scenes just seemed to bounce around sometimes. I had a few moments where I was unsure what the center of focus was intended to be by the author, such as in the classroom picture. I feel that Chrysanthemum's name should have not been the very last but in the middle so the reader could see how long and out of place it was compared to everyone else's. Being the last name on the page in the bottom right, it seemed out of place. I'm sure there was a reason for this, I'm just so unsure as to what it is or if I agree with it.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed reading 'Kitten's First Full Moon' so I decided to give this book a try... Henkes does not disappoint. 'Chrysanthemum' is easily relatable to any child who has also been teased about their name. The text and illustrations work well to tell a heartwarming tale about self-acceptance and self-confidence. It is also the only book I've read so far that depicts a pregnant character.
  • (5/5)
    This was a great story. Chrysanthemum loves her name in every way, whether that is writing it down or hearing it said by her parents, but when she gets to school, the other kids tease her because she is "named after a flower." This brings up the theme of bullying, and how kids will find anything they can to pick on. Instead of ignoring her classmates and holding her head high, Chrysanthemum "wilts" and starts thinking that maybe they are right. This brings up peer pressure in a way that the young audience can understand it; instead of being confident about her own name and not caring what other people think, Chrysanthemum succumbs to her classmates' peer pressure and begins to dislike her name. However, in the end, she regains that confidence about her name when she finds someone she can relate to, and the other kids learn that making fun of her isn't the right thing to do. There are a lot of life lessons packed into this book.