Disfruta de millones de libros electrónicos, audiolibros, revistas y más

A solo $11.99/mes después de la prueba. Puedes cancelar cuando quieras.

Adios, Mr. Chips

Adios, Mr. Chips

Escrito por James Hilton

Narrado por Santiago Munevar


Adios, Mr. Chips

Escrito por James Hilton

Narrado por Santiago Munevar

valoraciones:
3/5 (372 valoraciones)
Longitud:
1 hora
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2001
ISBN:
9781611553291
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

El modesto profesor que nadie podia olvidar. Una de las obras preferidas de los publicos, que ha sido llevada al cine en numerosas oportunidades, es la historia de Mr. Chips, un modesto profesor en una escuela provinciana, que ve pasar generaciones enteras de alumnos y que vive una vida basada en los recuerdos y en las tradiciones escolares. La sencillez del relato, asi como lo conmovedor de esta novela la han convertido en un pequeno clasico del siglo XX. James Hilton, su autor, fue hijo de un maestro de escuela y es posible que la novela tenga ribetes autobiograficos. Hilton es muy conocido por esta popular obra y por "Horizontes perdidos", la popular novela sobre un sitio donde nadie envejece.
Editorial:
Publicado:
1 ene 2001
ISBN:
9781611553291
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

James Hilton (1900–1954) was a bestselling English novelist and Academy Award–winning screenwriter. After attending Cambridge University, Hilton worked as a journalist until the success of his novels Lost Horizon (1933) and Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1934) launched his career as a celebrated author. Hilton’s writing is known for its depiction of English life between the two world wars, its celebration of English character, and its honest portrayal of life in the early twentieth century.



Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre Adios, Mr. Chips

3.1
372 valoraciones / 26 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    I chose to read this book because of its recommendation in James Mustich's "1000 Books to Read Before You Die". It was short and gentle and very moving in places. Chips is a likeable character, although not without his failings. The sections about his brief marriage and his remembrance of the death of the former German master in WWI were especially touching.
  • (4/5)
    The more we age, the more of our experience is behind us rather than ahead. And as we look back, the soothing temptation is to let ourselves be lulled into a comfortable, maybe mushy, sense of worthiness. Veteran school-master Mr Chips is an un-layered, rather flat, recognisably English character, rather like the butler in “Remains of the Day” but without the creeping self-doubt. For over time, his steadiness is seen to prevail. Strivers and innovators are distrusted or at least gently teased. The great upheavals of the age, undermining the Victorian-Edwardian order, are endured without major divergence from the settled methods. Chips’ ponderous manner is matched by Hilton’s sparing prose. And Chips wins us over, as the author dignifies those little foibles and familiar tics we adopt or succumb to as we age. Perhaps too, our own sense of receded ambitions and modest attainment is soothed. The overall effect is uplifting, memorable, even moving.
  • (4/5)
    This is the story of an old British schoolteacher reflecting on his life and career. I love boarding school stories, so I was interested in reading one from a teacher's point of view, and I wasn't disappointed. This is a short but powerful book, though I found it almost painfully sad at times. Mr. Chips is an average, even mediocre, teacher, and it was difficult to be faced with the combination of his mediocrity and personal tragedy. Of course, this also makes it very real. I'm just glad that he could reflect with satisfaction on his achievements in the end, and remember happy times without focusing on what was lost. Anyway, this is not always an easy book to read, but it's certainly worth the time.
  • (5/5)
    An enchanting look at an English schoolmaster, and the memories of his life and times over more than 60 years. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    When one thinks of Goodbye, Mr. Chips I am sure they are transported back to movies like Dead Poet's Society and Mr. Holland's Opus, two movies very similar in nature to Goodbye, Mr. Chips. Mr. Chips, the much loved teacher and sometime acting Head of Brookfield was devoted to his students and loved teaching them with a passion. Even when the boarding school tried to get him to retire they were unsuccessful. How do you rid yourself of pillar of the institution?
  • (3/5)
    Easy to speculate Hilton distills his own outlook on education into Chips, fitting insofar as it is inherently conservative, in the sense of upholding established ideals under threat of changing norms. No mere propaganda vehicle, however: Chips undergoes a transformation of character, becoming a jester within stolid Brookfield, a second-tier public school, in his effort to preserve tradition even while honouring the ideals of excellence and personal compassion (made manifest with his love for Kathie). Chips himself refers to "a sense of proportion".So, a self-conscious nostalgia trip, impressive as English history in miniature panorama. Brings to mind Forrest Gump: does the film adaptation hew closer or further from that peculiar sense of History-with-an-H? Similarly, an elegy to the influence an individual can wield. Sentimental, but at sufficient remove to allow a genuine glimpse into its time & place. An open question as to whether I would have thought the same when reading it on publication. An authenticity accrued over time, incidental to authorial intent.//Chips almost despite himself a contrarian: talking with a striker in broad view of the boys, bringing political talk down to a human level; his friendship with Max Staefel even through the Great War, exchanging letters; reciting Latin during an air raid.Like 84, Charing Cross Road, Good-bye, Mr Chips lends itself to reading aloud, with brief chapters and vignettes easily parceled out over several evenings before bed.