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Las Aventuras De Arturo Gordon Pym

Las Aventuras De Arturo Gordon Pym

Escrito por Edgar Allan Poe

Narrado por Carlos J. Vega


Las Aventuras De Arturo Gordon Pym

Escrito por Edgar Allan Poe

Narrado por Carlos J. Vega

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (17 valoraciones)
Longitud:
1 hora
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9781611553345
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Gordon Pym, un joven atraido por la vida marinera, que cae en amotinamientos, cruentas tempestades, en las manos de diabolicos salvajes y fantasias sobre la vida en el Polo Sur. Hay momentos de terror y de suspenso que hacen que esta sea novela que se destaca.
Editorial:
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9781611553345
Formato:
Audiolibro

Sobre el autor

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) reigned unrivaled in his mastery of mystery. Born in Boston, he was orphaned at age three, expelled from West Point for gambling and became an alcoholic. In 1836 he secretly wed his thirteen-year-old cousin. The Raven, published in 1845, made Poe famous. He died in 1849 under what remain suspicious circumstances.


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3.5
17 valoraciones / 17 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    Okay, I read this book for mostly two reasons: 1) I bought the book Pym by Mat Johnson, and figured I should read the book it is referencing first, and 2) Melville House published it in their novella series and you know I'm a sucker for Melville House.

    Of course, in what should probably be embarrassing for someone in love with a publisher who has named themselves after Melville, I can't really stand nautical writing. I mean, there's nothing really wrong with books that take place at sea, but inevitably there are multiple scenes all about rigging the jib sail and something the mizzen deck and I have no reference for any of these things and can't be bothered and it makes me batty. My strategy for this book was basically just to cross my eyes and skim through all those sections, which was pretty okay for getting me the background I need in order to appreciate Pym.

    This is a strange book. Of that tradition of adventure books filled with peril after peril and a few unlikely escapes. Rather different from Poe's horror, but there are some bits of dread that do feel more familiar. Then there is the frighteningly racist depiction of the "natives" discovered in the Antarctic region. I am so incredibly curious to see Pym's updated version.

    Glad I read it, but not my fave.
  • (5/5)
    This book is "Moby-Dick" decades before "Moby-Dick." What begins as a jaunty sea adventure tale takes a turn for a somewhat more frightening struggle at sea. Interspersed are descriptions of maritime history, the geography of islands, flora and fauna, and other over-the-top detailed "true" accounts which are not always accurate. As the novel progresses, it gets less and less realistic despite these pseudo-realistic, pseudo-scientific soliloquies. Eventually, the novel descends to a point of senselessness, fantastic beyond reason, symbolically deep beyond comprehension, and confusing beyond serious analysis. And that's the point, folks. Sometimes life doesn't have a happy ending, nor does it end successfully wrapped up with a cute bow tied on top. "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket" is a fun, confusing, hectic, strange book of unrecognized genius.One comment on here notes it wasn't very scary. I'd note that this book was not meant to be in the horror genre.
  • (3/5)
    I must say--this one is a strange one. When I first started reading it, I was thinking how beautiful Edgar Allan Poe's writing style was. But, the story is a slog at times. Sorry. It took me a month to read this short tale. The middle drags with too many longitude and latitude references and descriptions of bizarre animals. And Edgar Allan Poe--don't you just feel sorry for the guy? He had to be weird beyond measure. He is preoccupied with the human body, birds eating dead humans and people murdering and eating people. What is it with him and human flesh? (I'm thinking of the Telltale Heart, too, murdering and cutting up a body in small pieces and stuffing it under the floorboards.) Yuck.He also has this decided paranoia. You always wonder if he is just freaking out or if he's really in danger. (I'm thinking of The Raven, too.) Paranoia abounds in this work too. He has a preoccupation with being buried alive. He has a preoccupation with black and white. I really should read it again and look for all the references of black and white--they abound. One really needs to look at race relations through this novella, since it was written in 1838.So, why did I read it? I'm reading a series of 5 novellas from American authors to get a feel for the American writer and the development of American Literature. I've read Benito Cereno by Melville, Parnassus on Wheels by Morley and now The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket by Poe. Next up, Cather and Fitzgerald. Apparently, this little novel influenced American literature in a great way, including Melville and Lovecraft, and Jules Verne even wrote a sequel.This is a story of a young boy who runs away to the sea, and it is a classic shipwreck story with mutiny, deaths, storms, islands, animals, and longitude. Essentially it is a survival story multiple times over--but the ending is abrupt and very strange. I'm still trying to figure it out. Why is the water hot in the antarctic? There were a lot of loose ends in this story--where did that come from? How is that possible? Is he paranoid or is something really freaky here?
  • (3/5)
    In the only full length novel that Edgar Allan Poe ever wrote, he tells a tale set at sea of Arthur Gordon Pym. He sails around the globe, and during his misadventures at sea, he experiences a mutiny on board, a terrible storm resulting in a shipwreck, and a run-in with a tribe of cannibals. In order words, all sorts of madcap mayhem fun. As far as the novel itself goes, I wasn't wildly impressed. It seemed to ramble at times and most of it wasn't terribly compelling. I'm not the biggest fan of Poe's writing other than some of his classic stories and poems.On the other hand, there were many familiar elements in the story that other writers emulated in their stories. On that basis, I will give Poe credit for coming up with some innovative story lines that stood the test of time. Certain aspects of the novel stood out in that regards. One is the uncharted land with a savage tribe. Another is drawing the shortest straw to face one's death. There is a whole pirate element to it and some macabre aspects that I appreciated. Overall, although I wasn't overwhelmed by the novel, I can at least appreciate it.Carl Alves - author of Two For Eternity
  • (3/5)
    This was Poe's only full length novel, and its episodic nature and very abrupt ending seems to indicate he was probably right to focus on short stories, of which he is in my view one of the prime exponents. This is a long-winded story of shipwrecks, storms, cannibalism, burial alive (of course), and exploring new lands at the southern extremity of the world. The book's abrupt end seems to come when the narrator and his sole surviving shipmate are about to discover a mystery near the south pole, that is held to be a vindication of the "hollow Earth" theory, which still had some traction in the early 19th century when exploration of the polar regions was still in its relative infancy. This story is a curiosity rather than anything else.
  • (4/5)
    A peculiar book, much of it feels derivative (although, admittedly, a somewhat unfair charge because some of it is derivative of more familiar books that were written later and themselves may have derived from this), much of it fails to hang together and the ending is completely abrupt. It features many of the standard nautical devices, a stowaway, a mutiny, a storm at sea, cannibalism, a shipwreck, a previously unknown island--all that plus a mysterious large white humanoid creature that is introduced but not explained in the final sentence of the book.

    The book begins with Arthur Gordon Pym's boyhood sailing trip gone awry, followed by his stowing away on an adult voyage that goes wrong in just about every way. Much of the novel is in the form of a journal and it provides minimal descriptions of a few characters and just about no description of anyone else. It is part bildingsroman, part adventure, part science fiction, and depicts equal parts fear and wonder, horror and delight. OK, maybe not equal parts--it is certainly weighted towards the fear and horror side.

    I have not read any of Poe's short stories in a long time, but my memory is that the best of them come much closer to perfection than this, his only novel.
  • (4/5)
    A peculiar book, much of it feels derivative (although, admittedly, a somewhat unfair charge because some of it is derivative of more familiar books that were written later and themselves may have derived from this), much of it fails to hang together and the ending is completely abrupt. It features many of the standard nautical devices, a stowaway, a mutiny, a storm at sea, cannibalism, a shipwreck, a previously unknown island--all that plus a mysterious large white humanoid creature that is introduced but not explained in the final sentence of the book.The book begins with Arthur Gordon Pym's boyhood sailing trip gone awry, followed by his stowing away on an adult voyage that goes wrong in just about every way. Much of the novel is in the form of a journal and it provides minimal descriptions of a few characters and just about no description of anyone else. It is part bildingsroman, part adventure, part science fiction, and depicts equal parts fear and wonder, horror and delight. OK, maybe not equal parts--it is certainly weighted towards the fear and horror side.I have not read any of Poe's short stories in a long time, but my memory is that the best of them come much closer to perfection than this, his only novel.
  • (2/5)
    I'm not really sure what to write about this, the only novel by Edgar Allen Poe - mostly famous for his imaginative short stories of the grotesque. This novel starts out as a real boy-adventure story at sea - mutiny, shipwreck etc. but it quickly turns very brutal and horrific. Most of the story the narrator is dazed and confused - either from lack of sleep or lack of food and water - and it gives the tale a dreamlike quality - his turmoils seems never ending and I must admit too much for my stomach. It's also very detailed in its description of various things the main character encounters - which slows down the action considerable. I didn't understand the ending either - which made me a little irritated. Well, I have read some of his short stories and they are much better. This novel was a disappointment.
  • (4/5)
    What a cliffhanger! Overall, the book is pretty interesting - there are some long and dry digressions but also some moments of pants-crapping intensity to liven it up.
  • (4/5)
    Poe never ceases to fascinate. His only novel starts like a realistic narrative of life at sea, then turns into a horrific story of survival, and then morphs into a fantasy about aboriginal island tribes and an imaginary trip to a completely-divorced-from-reality version of the south pole. Quite different from the short stories and poems by which he is known, but still an intriguing read.
  • (3/5)
    Although too rough, inconsistent, and episodic to really work as a novel, there are some truly chilling images and fascinating scenarios.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting book. A narrative on an expedition to the southern seas. Despite being the work of E.A Poe and a potentially good story, the book is childish at times and has got too many loose ends. Hope the continuation by Jules Verne is better.
  • (3/5)
    Growing up, Poe was an athor I really liked--while I can't say that I have read ALL of his works, I am happy to report reading most of his short stories, and of course some of his poetry. Throughout school, whenever we studied Poe, those two genres were mentioned: poetry and short stories. It wasn't until a few weeks ago when I was told Poe had written a novel--this one. I was shocked! How had I never learned of this?!

    Better late than never and I am happy to report my local library had a copy.

    The plot of this novel is pretty interesting: a boy hides out on a boat becuase his family won't let him leave, but then the boy suffers from a mutany (maybe his family was right?) and eventually only 4 people remain on the boat...next problem, food and water. It gets so bad that the four draw straws to see who will make the ultimate sacrifice so others may eat him. After barely hanging on for weeks, they are finally seen and rescued by a boat. Only to be taken on another adventure to find the south pole...where savages await them.

    Poor Pym...I think he really might have been better off listening to his grandpa.
  • (4/5)
    echt hallucinant, zeer gedetailleerd, pseudorealisme, versterkt door wetenschappelijk aandoende beschrijvingen.
  • (3/5)
    En el minuto 11:07 del capítulo 8 (último), se averió el audio. No se pudo escuchar el final .
    Lástima porque el relato es muy interesante.
    Me hizo pensar en tantos relatos de náufragos que existen en la literatura. Desconocía que Osca W había escrito sobre este tema. Y pensé también en el proceder depredador de los seres humanos en todos los tiempos.......
  • (3/5)
    Ich hätte mir mehr erhoftt, ist E. A. Poes einziger längerer Roman und das Thema an sich hat mich immer schon gefesselt... Das Buch war zwar spannend, aber letztlich derart mit Seefahrtsausdrücken durchsetzt, dass man es ohne erläuternde Fussnoten (die Diogenes in der vorliegenden Ausgabe blöderweise nicht dazuliefert), nur bedingt versteht. Last but not least ärgert mich das (offene und nicht im Kontext der Resterzählung zu verstehende) Ende... Dem diesem vorangegangene "phantastischen" Teil fehlt es mE an Hintergründigem, sodass letztlich vieles der Story rätselhaft bleibt...Hinsichtlich des "phantastischen Teils" (warme Strömungen in antarktischen Gewässern) sollte man meiner Ansicht nicht außer Acht lassen, dass Poe lediglich die Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts außerordentlich populäre Theorie vom eisfreien Nordpolarmeer auf die Südsee umlegt...
  • (4/5)
    Claimed to be Edgar Alan Poe’s only novel, but it reads to me like a collection of three, possibly four, short stories. It was published in 1838 before he had achieved significant sales as an author, he was making a living as a critic, reviewer and writer of articles and stories. A year later he published a two volume collection of his short stories: ‘Tales of the Grotesque and the Arabesque’ and the stories in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym would not have been out off place had they been included.The frontispiece to the “novel” gives the game away almost at once:COMPRISING THE DETAILS OF A MUTINY AND ATROCIOUS BUTCHERY ON BOARD THE AMERICAN BRIG GRAMPUS, ON HER WAY TO THE SOUTH SEAS, IN THE MONTH OF JUNE, 1827WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECAPTURE OF THE VESSEL BY THE SURVIVORS; THEIR SHIPWRECK AND SUBSEQUENT HORRIBLE SUFFERINGS FROM FAMINE; THEIT DELIVERANCE BY MEANS OF THE BRITISH SCHOONER JANE GUY; THE BRIEF CRUISE OF THIS LATTER VESSEL IN THE ANTARCTIC OCEAN; HER CAPTURE AND THE MASSACRE OF HER CREW AMONG A GROUP OF ISLANDS IN THE EIGHTY-FOURTH PARALLEL OF SOUTHERN LATTITUDE;TOGETHER WITH THE INCREDIBLE ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERIES STILL FURTHER SOUTH TO WHICH THAT DISTRESSING CALAMITY GAVE RISE. If this all sounds like a blurb to suck in readers to an adventure story which will titillate and excite then it would not be far wrong from my reading of the book. The titillation is provided by the reference to horrible sufferings and atrocious butchery, while the excitement is the fantasy of what lies beyond the eighty-fourth parallel which remained uncharted at the time. It would be another 60 years before Robert Falcon Scott in the ship Discovery got passed 82 degrees South and discovered the Polar plateau.The continuity between the three stories is provided by Arthur Gordon Pym who in each of the tales is in danger of death by starvation; first on board the American Brig the Grampus where he is a stowaway locked in the hold and must survive a mutiny taking place above him and his reliance on a friend who can no longer get to him with food and water, then on the hull of the brig where he and three companions are marooned following the retaking of the vessel and its near destruction through violent storms, finally on an island in the warmer waters beyond the 84th parallel where he is trapped by hostile savages. Poe is at his best when describing the sufferings and and vicissitudes of people in a desperate situation and where there appears little hope of survival. He has a way of communicating the desperation of his characters plight that is both macabre and exciting. The Cruise on the British Schooner the Jane Guy in little known waters and which visits some of the remotest known islands like The Kerguelen Islands and Tristan D’acuna reads like a travelogue, something that might appear in the National Geographical magazine and has given rise to some people thinking it could have been inspiration for Herman Melville’s style of writing in Moby-Dick. The final section/story in the novel is the discovery of a mysterious group of islands in the warmer waters that Poe tells us lie beyond the ice towards the South Pole. We are now reading a fantasy, a story that has led to this book being heralded as early science fiction. Poe provides us with a surprise ending that takes into consideration the events of the final section, but bears little relation to what has gone before. This is a collection of nautical adventure stories that are well written and very readable. Poe is able to provide plenty of atmosphere in stories that kept me wanting to turn the pages (can you say that when reading on a Kindle?). I just don’t see it as a novel and so as a collection of short stories it is rated as 3.5 stars and as a novel 2 stars.