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Mind Prey

Mind Prey

Escrito por John Sandford

Narrado por John Shea


Mind Prey

Escrito por John Sandford

Narrado por John Shea

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (24 valoraciones)
Longitud:
2 horas
Publicado:
Nov 1, 1996
ISBN:
9780743541374
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

From the bestselling author of night prey and winter prey...an all-new Lucas Davenport thriller.
Run for it...
It was raining when psychiatrist Andi Manette left the parent-teacher conference with her two young daughters, and she was distracted. She barely noticed the red van parked beside her, barely noticed the van door slide open as they dashed up to the car. The last thing she did notice was the hand reaching out for her and the voice from out of the past -- and then the three of them were gone.
Hours later, deputy chief Lucas Davenport stood in the parking lot, a blood-stained shoe in his hand, the ground stained pink around him, and knew that this would be one of the worst cases he'd ever been on. With an urgency born of dread, he presses the attack, while in an isolated farmhouse, Andi Manette does the same, summoning all her skills to battle an obsessed captor. She knows the man who has taken her and her daughters, knows there is a chink in his armor, if only she can find it. But for both her and Davenport, time is already running out.
John Sandford's novels have always been extraordinary for their harrowing twists, unforgettable characters, and crackling prose. But Mind Prey tops them all. It is the work of a true master.
Publicado:
Nov 1, 1996
ISBN:
9780743541374
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

John Sandford is the author of twenty-four Prey novels; the Virgil Flowers novels, most recently Storm Front; and six other books. He lives in New Mexico.

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Lo que piensa la gente sobre Mind Prey

4.3
24 valoraciones / 13 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    In the seventh Lucas Davenport novel a psychiatrist and her two children are kidnapped by a deranged ex-patient. Like the best of Sandford it builds suspense in the middle and races as it reaches the conclusion.
  • (5/5)
    Liked it a good ending full of suspense good good
  • (3/5)
    The suspense in these books is so strong as to be perceived as unpleasant, particularly when you're invested in the characters. I guess that's a good thing.
  • (5/5)
    To me, Mind Prey is the best of the 'Prey' series written (and I think I've read them all). The language is also the absolute worst, but there you have it. It works. A real show stopper from beginning to end with very clever copy and outstanding dialogue. This is a rare five star vote for me.
  • (5/5)
    Fast-paced and psychologically revealing. Kind of took your breath away. Good stuff.
  • (3/5)
    In Mind Prey, police chief Lucas Davenport is chasing down a killer who has just kidnapped psychiatrist Andi Manette and her two daughters. The kidnapper is John Mail, a former patient of Andi’s. Lucas must match wits with the highly intelligent killer, who is enacting violent sexual fantasies with her. As part of Lucas’s strategy, he uses a computer game company that he owns to draw out Mail, who is also a gamer.As far as thrillers of this type, Mind Prey stacks up well against others of the genre. One of the things that usually destroys these types of books are ridiculous and unbelievable killers. Mail is better developed than your typical fiction thriller killer. The back and forth between Davenport and Mail is also solid. There’s nothing spectacular about this novel. Although it lacks a wow factor, it is a solid read.Carl Alves – author of Blood Street
  • (4/5)
    When a wealthy doctor - with strong ties to both political parties - and her two young daughters are kidnapped, the press is out for blood and the family is calling in their markers. But there's no ransom call. Instead, the kidnapper wants to play a game with Davenport....Creepy insane gamer guy is just a bit too lucid at times. Love the cop banter and the ending, well, don't want to spoil it. Good read.
  • (4/5)
    I read at least one John Sandford mystery each summer during vacation. This year I read Mind Prey. As always, Lucas Davenport is chasing the criminals of the Minneapolis communities while simultaneously addressing the personal conundrums in his own life. The dual-careered Davenport lives his adventure and creates the computer adventure games truly appreciated by gamers; his brain, perfectly designed to deal with these adventures, is at the same time logical and creative. In Mind Prey, Lucas must deal with the kidnap and probable murder of a wealthy therapist and mother of two daughters who have also been abducted. Money, revenge, adultery, sexual assault, mental illness, and the will to survive are among the themes in the book. However, the main focus, as always, is Lucas Davenport out-smarting the bad guys. He is able to use the creative side of his brain to hypothesize possible motives and movements of the "perpetrators," a term which Lucas says people only get from watching tv. While I love to hold a book in my hands, turn the pages, and reluctantly bookmark, having the audiobook to listen to is wonderful the multi-tasking teacher on vacation. I can do the work that was put off during the school year while listening to a Sandford novel. I love that he writes in such a way that I can try to solve the mystery myself along with Lucas Davenport. It is fun to occasionally say, "I knew it! I really did."
  • (3/5)
    This was definitely an improvement over the previous two installments. The story moves along quickly, well it sort of has to in this instance, and with a frenzied effort by Davenport on all fronts. This story has some ethical issues addressed as well as Davenport stressing over a personal dilemma during the crisis, which makes for a few will he or won't he moments along the way. Weather's actions at the end have me really not liking her and hoping for their relationship to end. If he had to think that long, it's obviously a mistake and I'm was quite surprised he didn't react angrily to her actions.
  • (5/5)
    Of the entire series so far, Mind Prey is the meanest. The Prey novels follow Lucas Davenport through a series of encounters with socio/psychopaths and Mind Prey is one of the few that deal with a sexual predator. John Mail, the nemesis in question, is mean. Plain and simple. Furthermore his quarry are women and children and Sandford pulls no punches in his creation of a warped and mentally unstable villain. Davenport as ever, effortlessly sparks wry and enjoyable narrative and the cast around hi1ms paint a story that flows and is easy to believe. Sandford's style rarely misses the mark and in Mind Prey everything hits home, with a gripping story of two men desperate to succeed, both willing to do whatever it takes. Mind Prey doesn't let up and each chapter builds the pressure, ultimately creating a great and suspenseful read. Standalone or in the series, Mind Prey shouldn't be missed.
  • (4/5)
    This is the best of the Prey series that I've read. I consider myself a mini-expert based on having read seven of these titles in just a few weeks. The John Mail character was so completely crazy and ruthless, and the plight of the victims so awful--the reader just has to be at the edge of her seat the entire way through. I was thinking about the notion of genre books and how they can't compare to literary fiction. But they don't have to. A good detective novel has the ability to stir up just the right brew of emotion and interest to create a reasonable and resonate reaction in the reader. Sometimes that's just good enough.
  • (4/5)
    I've read several of these books, and really enjoy them. Davenport is an interesting character. His relations with women are always amusing.
  • (4/5)
    One of the earlier books in the Lucas Davenport series, where Lucas was a Minneapolis police detective specializing in weird and difficult cases. Every "Prey" novel is packed with interesting characters, fascinating police procedure and, always, the unique character, humor and brilliance of Lucas Davenport.