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Liar

Liar

Escrito por Justine Larbalestier

Narrado por Channie Waites


Liar

Escrito por Justine Larbalestier

Narrado por Channie Waites

valoraciones:
4/5 (88 valoraciones)
Longitud:
9 horas
Publicado:
Sep 29, 2009
ISBN:
9781441802040
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Micah will freely admit she's a compulsive liar, but that may be the one honest thing she'll ever tell you. Over the years she's fooled everyone: her classmates, her teachers, even her parents. And she's always managed to stay one step ahead of her lies. That is, until her boyfriend dies under brutal circumstances and her dishonesty begins to catch up with her. But is it possible to tell the truth when lying comes as easily as breathing?

Taking listeners deep into the psyche of a young woman who will say just about anything to convince them - and herself - that she's finally come clean, Liar is a bone-chilling thriller that will have listeners seesawing between truths and lies right up to the end. Honestly.
Publicado:
Sep 29, 2009
ISBN:
9781441802040
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Sobre el autor

Justine Larbalestier es la autora de narrativa juvenil de mayor éxito en Australia. Ha sido galardonada con todos los premios del género en su país natal. Autora de 8 novelas, todas ellas de gran éxito de ventas y crítica, Mi hermana Rosa es su última novela.  Actualmente vive en Sydney. Sus grandes pasiones son la jardinería, el cricket y la ciudad de Nueva York.


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3.8
88 valoraciones / 86 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    Micah is a pathological liar - this is the only reliable aspect about the book. She is such an unreliable narrator, that I was uncomfortable all the way through wondering if she was telling me the truth or not. Even now, although I've finished the book, I'm still not sure what the exact truth is. An interesting psychological thriller.
  • (5/5)
    I first heard of Liar when everyone was talking about the controversy surrounding the original cover. I filed it away in the back of my mind, thinking of picking the book up when it came out. I was reminded of it recently when friends started to talk about it again -- through having read it, now -- and put it on my last minute Christmas list. Cue me getting it in the mail yesterday, and being almost unable to resist the lure of the first page, which starts with the hook, "I was born with a light covering of fur."

    If you don't enjoy unreliable narrators, step away right now. Micah is as unreliable as you can get, and the whole book peels back -- or layers on -- more of her lies.

    For the first part of the book, it could be the story of a normal teenager -- one who has had bad things happen to her, and who is a loner, yes, but one who is essentially like those around her. It doesn't stay like that, though: if you're not a fan of fantastical elements, you probably want to step back now.

    The thing with this book is that there are at least two ways of reading it. It's a delicate balance to walk, but Larbalestier does, in my opinion, walk it well. It wasn't wholly unpredictable, but I have been spoiled a little by reading other people's reviews. If you can, and this book sounds interesting to you, then try to go into it knowing as little as possible -- just knowing that Micah is a liar (not a spoiler: it's in the title).

    The other thing that pleased me was the fact that the book has non-white characters -- chiefly non-white characters, in fact -- and LGBT content, plus a generally sex-positive attitude. There's totally non-explicit sexual references, there's an understanding of teenagers feeling and dealing with desire, and I didn't get a 'sex is bad, hush, we don't talk about sex' vibe from it.

    (It irks me that there are likely people reading this review thinking, 'I'd better not give this to my teenage daughter.' There's nothing in this that would have damaged my fragile fourteen year old psyche. It's just people.)

    I realise this doesn't tell you much about how I, personally, felt about this book: I read it within the space of an afternoon, and kept stopping myself after every fifty pages so I could drag it out more and enjoy it for that bit longer. When I put it down, I already had a list of people I want to recommend it to.
  • (5/5)
    If you haven't read it, I highly recommend that you do.I'm not sure what to say because I really don't want to spoil anyone. This book would be no fun otherwise. Well, a little fun, but it wouldn't be the same. I am weirdly a fan of unreliable narrator books which is funny because they are no fun in real life. But I digress. Micah is a piece of work. I felt so sorry for her, but at the same time, I almost couldn't stand her. Larbalestier did a brilliant job of writing an almost sympathetic unreliable narrator. She did a brilliant job of making me believe multiple things at once and of convincing me each and every time that she was telling the truth. A-maz-ing.The Little Bookworm
  • (5/5)
    The premise: ganked from BN.com: Micah will freely admit she’s a compulsive liar, but that may be the one honest thing she’ll ever tell you. Over the years she’s fooled everyone: her classmates, her teachers, even her parents. And she’s always managed to stay one step ahead of her lies. That is, until her boyfriend dies under brutal circumstances and her dishonesty begins to catch up with her. But is it possible to tell the truth when lying comes as easily as breathing? Taking listeners deep into the psyche of a young woman who will say just about anything to convince them — and herself — that she’s finally come clean, Liar is a bone-chilling thriller that will have listeners seesawing between truths and lies right up to the end. Honestly.My RatingKeeper Shelf: there are very, very, VERY few books that I want to keep around to re-read over and over and over, but this is definitely one of them. The book engaged me on so many levels that I can't wait to read it again and see how the story changes. And because of the book's deliberate yet delightful ambiguity, this is a book I can enjoy over and over and come away with a different interpretation every time. If you're a reader who absolutely MUST HAVE a DEFINITE ENDING with DEFINITE ANSWERS, you may want to shy away from this one. But oh, that'd be a shame. This book is so well-crafted that you'd be missing out on a really great story. Like I said, whether you read YA or not, if you only ever read ONE novel in your life that's targeted to YA, you should read this one. Because it transcends age. It transcends genre. It's a memorable book that I won't soon forget, and once you read it, you won't either.Review style: short and sweet and ABSOLUTELY NO SPOILERS. You will RUIN this book if you spoil it for yourself, even if you spoil yourself a little bit. The full review just lists five reasons why you should give this book a shot, so if you're interested, feel free to click the link below to my LJ. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)REVIEW: Justine Larbalestier's LIARHappy Reading! :)
  • (4/5)
    There's no review here only because I can't think of any way I can review this without spoilers. You want to go into this book knowing as little about it as possible beforehand. And then enjoy the ride.
  • (5/5)
    Oh I loved this book SO MUCH. I thought I would like it, but I just wasn't expecting to LOVE IT this much. I'm the best kind of excited about it!
  • (3/5)
    I liked what the author did with the concept of "werewolves." Her story and her characters were interesting, although I didn't find any of them likable. However, it was yet ANOTHER teen book suffering from an air of doom and gloom. I am so weary of this quality and find that it is all too common. We need more balanced stories about teenagers and their experience of the world.
  • (4/5)
    I don't think I'm any closer to figuring out Micah. I still don't know exactly what she was telling the truth about and I have so many questions. I keep forgetting that she's not a real person, and I'll never be able to ask her exactly what happened. I believe, without a doubt, that she's killed, I'm just not sure who she's killed. Perhaps her brother, Jordon? Ugh, this book made/ makes my brain itch! If I had the time, I might re-read it just to try to figure out the clues Micah leaves behind. If you're looking for a book that will REALLY keep you questioning things to the very end this is THAT book. Justine Larbalestier should write murder mysteries because she would be fantastic at it, and I don't think anyone would ever figure out who the murderer is.
  • (3/5)
    A good example of unreliable witness as narrator, but to get almost halfway into it and then have the whole werewolf thing pop up was just odd. The writing can be fragmented at times, and Pete's voice never seemed real to me. Interesting precepts, but not compelling.
  • (3/5)
    generally well-written but I tired of it before it ended
  • (1/5)
    This is so not my kind of book. I dislike the unreliable narrator. I dislike the breathless writing style. I really, really hate the secret at the heart of it all. Or is it a secret at all? No, maybe it's the unreliable narrator again! Who can tell? I dislike the unresolved nature of everything about this book. Not to mention the sheer goofiness of the pivotal plot point. A lot of people love this book with all their hearts, judging from all the 5 star reviews. I'm not one of them, and that is the truth.
  • (2/5)
    Ugh.

    Spoiler alert.

    I didn't realize this was a paranormal story. I should have figured it out sooner, there were plenty of clues in the narrative. I've quit reading at about 50%, I'm just not interested in werewolves.
  • (3/5)
    I really don't know what I thought of this one. Unreliable narrator taken to an extreme.
  • (4/5)
    I absolutely loved the first half of this: the twists and turns as Micah teases out bits of fact from fiction, admits that some of what she's confessed to is a lie. She's reliably unreliable in what she says her truths are, so when she gets to the major one, you still don't know if you can actually trust her. She does admit that small lies pile up, so... who knows what's true and what's an elaborate story she's telling herself.

    That said, I wasn't really on board with the Big Reveal--but it's easy enough to convince myself that Micah was lying about it anyway.

    I can see why this is getting so much hype, and I'm honestly surprised there's no Rosebud-is-a-sled spoiling around the internet. yet. Maybe you should read this fast, before word gets out.
  • (5/5)
    Just as great as I'd heard it was. It's all mind games beginning to end - I knew the premise and thought I was a step ahead, but by the end... I'm not nearly so sure.

    The portrayal of life in high school is brutally honest, even if the narrator isn't. I have no patience with high school novels at the best of times, but Liar really cuts to the bone without belaboring the point.

    Totally would recommend.
  • (5/5)
    Exquisite. A perfect balancing act. Just how unreliable is this narrator? Who knows? I'm not sure Larbalestier knows. The cover is too overtly feminine for Micah, but thank the stars they changed the image.
  • (3/5)
    First of all, I found the story to be very fascinating. I think the writing was very fitting for Micah, and I like how we got the story out of order. I think the book was extremely well written and well thought out. I went into it expecting to not know what was actually the truth until the very end, and was very disappointed that I never got that truth. I love a good mystery, but I definitely want to know the truth at the end of the day. So while I loved it, I didn't. I didn't ever really connect with Micah because I felt that I couldn't trust her. Overall, the book just didn't give me enough. I really want to know what really happened to everyone, and I never will. And for that I totally resent "Liar".
  • (5/5)
    Liar is about a girl named Micah, who is dated a guy named Zach. During school she tries to contact him because he's been missing for a few days now. After, during a class in school, the Principal walks into Micah's class room and annouces Zach is dead. Micah is a liar so she lies a lot in this book. After a few weeks of Zach's funeral, things started to change and then the Real truth comes out in the end.I give this book a 10/10 because its a very suspenseful book and has lots of stories and details of what things happened and how life is like for her.
  • (4/5)
    This is a story told by a highly skilled author. The characters are alive with good spirit. Teenages can relate to many feelings that the main character possesses. I could not put the book down once I started reading. The plot is thrilling and twisting. Emotions will be taken on a roller coaster journey. Readers will appreciate the suspense, the compliction and the resolution of the story.
  • (3/5)
    It's been a Long Time since I was a young adult - or whatever it was that they called us in those days. I should declare I'm not 100% sure I know why I was reading a book that's so obviously for young adults as LIAR is. I should also declare that I'm profoundly and very dogmatically allergic to some aspects of the "fantastic". I am, however, not completely opposed to the entire "other", the mystical or inexplicable (otherwise a couple of my all time favourite books are completely unfathomable), but I am twitchy about these things. Very very twitchy.LIAR is therefore not the book for me. Having said that, I could see how it might work for lots (okay well probably most) other readers. It's an interesting idea. It's presented well (I'm sure that sinking feeling of the obvious that I felt as things started to reveal themselves was just my problem). It's well written, I can see how it would be extremely engaging. In it's favour - there's no swooning romance in sight, that vampire / sighing romance thing that's around at the moment being my most particular pet-loathing. There was an attraction between two young kids that works, and is oddly realistic (in terms of the rest of the stuff that's going on). The way the truth is revealed is elegantly done and I can really see how this book would appeal to anybody without a pathological barf reflex at the central premise.
  • (3/5)
    This was an interesting read, since you never quite knew what the truth was. The story was revisited many times, with different facts. I totally didn't see the werewolf thing coming, and was wondering the whole time if that was a lie. A bit long though, in my opinion. Part mystery, part thriller, give this to readers who like both.
  • (4/5)
    There's no review here only because I can't think of any way I can review this without spoilers. You want to go into this book knowing as little about it as possible beforehand. And then enjoy the ride.
  • (1/5)
    4Q, 3PThis was my audiobook choice for this course, and I have to admit it was quite the difficult experience for me. I was warned, both by the narrator and the people I know who've read the book, about the lying involved, but I was wholly unprepared for the extent of it. Did anything in this book really happen? It's so hard to say. It was very difficult to be wrapped up in this first-person narrative, inside Micah's compulsive liar mind. She/he/it, in my opinion, is an absolutely horrible person/thing. Wow, what an emotional roller coaster! I do have to say, though, that I think this would be a great choice for a book group discussion. I can see some people really liking the exploration of the loose ends this this book leaves unanswered, and others really hating them. I think that this polarizing effect could make for some great discussion.Some notes on the audio part of this book. I found the performer's accents (the French mother, several Latin American characters, to name a few) to be really poor. They were also distracting. Another thing that I notice was that when I listened to the discs in my car, the ends of each "chapter" were cut off, which was very disorienting. When I listened to it in iTunes, however, this problem was eliminated.
  • (5/5)
    Splendid, splendid book. I had steered clear of spoilers, bar the title, and the issue of the cover (which was thankfully resolved), and it leaves me thinking about it back and forth. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Crazy-odd book written by Micah, the protagonist, who is a pathological liar. There are curveballs all the way to the end. Where is Micah now? What is she doing? Depends on who you believe. This is a fun read with lots of twists and turns. If you think you can spot a liar - or when a friend or your child is lying - give this book a read; it will shatter your confidence. The story dragged for me in the beginning to where I put it down. When I resumed reading this liar's tale it became a page-turner.I recommend this for teens and adults. Good fun.
  • (4/5)
    Micah is a compulsive liar who has earned herself a reputation at every school she's attended. She can't seem to help making up crazy stories about herself and her family. Her excuse is that she has a huge secret that she absolutely must keep, so she surrounds it with lots of little lies to keep it safe. Micah narrates her story and has promised to come clean to us, the readers. She jumps back and forth in time to before and after her "boyfriend" turned up missing and was found violently murdered. As her story goes on, Micah reveals the lies she has been telling in spite of her promise. Some of these lies are small, but many are incredible and simply not the kind of thing someone would lie about. As she reveals her deepest secret and the mysterious plot continues to unfold, readers will have to decide for themselves whether or not to believe what the Liar is saying.This is a psychologically disturbing and compelling novel that makes effective use of the unreliable narrator. Some readers may find her big secret to be a bit of a stretch, but it fits well within the body of contemporary teen novels. Language is rich and descriptive, painting a vivid picture of Micah's world and its complexity. The ending is rather chaotic, but it is an enjoyable and memorable read overall.Liar is highly recommended for high school and public libraries, and will be particularly enjoyed by teens who are interested in mystery, mind games, and complex characters.
  • (3/5)
    Started off brilliantly but as soon as the werewolf fantasy makes an appearance the book begins to unravel. The idea that the chief protagonist is unbelievable is the hook that had me engaged, but in fantasy anything is possible, so my interest waned at this point.
  • (5/5)
    Don't let the YA tag stop you, this is the best kind of young adult literature, compelling and unique.Micah is a liar. She's lied all her life, but now she's telling the truth. Her boyfriend - her secret boyfriend - has died under mysterious and brutal circumstances, and she wants to set the record straight.This time she's telling the truth. She promises.
  • (3/5)
    This is such an unusual book. An unreliable narrator starts the tale which becomes a murder mystery and then a supernatural story. It works!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book, but was expecting more of a resolution at the end. I like the fact that it has a completely unreliable narrator so that the reader has to question everything; however, still not really knowing what happened when the book ends might make some readers feel a bit cheated. Still, it's a really entertaining and original YA novel. I would say more, but there isn't much to say without giving things away.