Encuentra tu próximo/a audiolibro favorito/a

Conviértete en miembro hoy y escucha gratis durante 30 días
Dalai Lama: My Son

Dalai Lama: My Son

Escrito por Diki Tsering

Narrado por Arabella Hong


Dalai Lama: My Son

Escrito por Diki Tsering

Narrado por Arabella Hong

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (2 valoraciones)
Longitud:
4 horas
Publicado:
May 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743545730
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Born to humble but prosperous peasants in 1901, the Year of the Ox, Diki Tsering grew up a simple girl with a simple life and the ordinary ambition to be a good wife and mother. When faith and fate led her son Lhamo Dhondup to be recognized as the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, her world altered completely.
In Dalai Lama, My Son she recounts her own amazing story from her early life with her "tended family and siblings to the customs and rituals of old Tibet and her arranged marriage at age sixteen. She vividly recalls the births of her children and their Buddhist upbringing; His Holiness, unfolding personality; the visitors who came to her town to seek the new Dalai Lama; the family's arduous move to Lhasa; and the years there until the Chinese invasion of Tibet and the family's escape and eventual exile.
Rich in historic and cultural details, this moving glimpse into the origins of the Dalai Lama personalizes the history of the Tibetan people, the magic of their culture, the role of their women. and their ancient ideals of compassion, faith, and equanimity.
Publicado:
May 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743545730
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor


Relacionado con Dalai Lama

Audiolibros relacionados
Artículos relacionados

Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre Dalai Lama

4.5
2 valoraciones / 2 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    sincere and genuine account approached from a moms perspective, and one tough gal, a survivor to what most of us would find unbearable to go through
  • (4/5)
    The memoirs of the ordinary Tibetan housewife who became the Dalai Lama's mom. Diki Tsering was illiterate, but her niece tape-recorded interviews with her before her death in 1980 and those interviews became this book. I most enjoyed the first half, where Tsering talks about her childhood and early adulthood in Tibet before the Chinese invasion. Life in that time and place was very simple and had a lot of beauty, but a lot of harshness too. Tsering writes about the bad treatment of women in Tibetan society -- a daughter-in-law was basically a slave, and widows were compelled to remarry whether they wanted to or not -- and about how, of her sixteen children, nine of them did not live past infancy. Yet she clearly enjoyed her early life, surrounded by a loving family, and knowing very well her place in the world.I thought the second half of the book, about the Dalai Lama's rise to power and the family's escape to India, was much weaker. I don't know much about the Dalai Lama's life or the situation in Tibet and I couldn't understand a lot of what was going on. I think if I knew more I would have liked this part better. For this reason I would recommend this as only a supplement to learning about Tibet and the Dalai Lama.Can you imagine the bragging rights this woman must have had? Other people's sons get good grades in school or are star soccer players; her son was GOD.