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Best Friends Forever: A Novel

Best Friends Forever: A Novel

Escrito por Jennifer Weiner

Narrado por Kate Baldwin y Rick Holmes


Best Friends Forever: A Novel

Escrito por Jennifer Weiner

Narrado por Kate Baldwin y Rick Holmes

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (62 valoraciones)
Longitud:
6 horas
Publicado:
Jul 14, 2009
ISBN:
9780743582322
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Some bonds can never be broken...

Addie Downs and Valerie Adler will be best friends forever. That's what Addie believes after Valerie moves across the street when they're both nine years old. But in the wake of betrayal during their teenage years, Val is swept into the popular crowd, while mousy, sullen Addie becomes her school's scapegoat.

Flash-forward fifteen years. Valerie Adler has found a measure of fame and fortune working as the weathergirl at the local TV station. Addie Downs lives alone in her parents' house in their small hometown of La Prairie, Illinois, caring for a troubled brother and trying to meet Prince Charming on the Internet. She's just returned from Bad Date #6, when she opens her door to find her long-gone best friend standing there, with a terrified look on her face and blood on the sleeve of her coat. "Something horrible has happened," Val tells Addie, "and you're the only one who can help."

Best Friends Forever is a grand, hilarious, edge-of-your-seat adventure; a story about betrayal and loyalty, family history and small-town secrets. It's about living through tragedy, finding love where you least expect it, and the ties that keep best friends together.
Publicado:
Jul 14, 2009
ISBN:
9780743582322
Formato:
Audiolibro

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También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eighteen books, including Good in Bed, That Summer, and an essay collection, Hungry Heart: Adventures in Life, Love, and Writing. A graduate of Princeton University and contributor to the New York Times Opinion section, Jennifer lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com.

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3.4
62 valoraciones / 55 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    Good, but not great. I didn't feel a connection to any of the characters, but I enjoyed the story. More than anything, I just felt sorry for the characters (they each had their pathetic moments).
  • (3/5)
    listened to the abridged version on my trip down to corning and back this week (I wish I had known it was abridged! I hate abridged!) It wasn't bad. It was okay. Kept me occupied for my ride.
  • (3/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    Hmm What can I say? I loved reading some parts. Especially when she talked about the past when they were young. That was excellent but then the weird story about the guy. Why does she have to add a touch of Mystery? Back in the days I loved Jennifer Weiner's books so when her 4th book came out i did not hesitate to buy it. What a mistake. It turned out she had tried to write a mystery book and I hated it.(Talking about Goodbye Nobody) I did not give up on her and some books after that one were nice, not as good as her first 3 books though.

    You can see it in this book too. She can be so good but when she adds a crime nd mystery it go's downhill. It all is just so unrealistic.The cops who start a big investigation after they find some blood and a belt. The way the cop acted, the way the 2 girls acted.
    Jennifer. Give up the Mystery!! Stick with what you are good at.
    I still give it 3 stars cause as i said some parts were really good.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (4/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    I think this is my favorite Jennifer Weiner book so far. It was funny and perfect for reading on a sunny summer day.

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (2/5)

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

    Valerie Violet Adler is a bitch who doesn't deserve to have any friends at all... how in the hell am I supposed to believe that Addie would drop everything and welcome Val back into her life, especially under those circumstances, like that? Am I supposed to be celebrating the fact that apparently even 15 years after she is screwed over by Val, Addie delights in the knowledge that Val "needs" her now?

    Books like this that paint pathetic pictures of single, fat, lonely women really piss me off. Especially when the plot is actually a relatively good idea that could have been written much better!

    Esto le resultó útil a 1 persona

  • (2/5)
    I don't think that it is a good sign that I like the main character less because she gets suckered into her best friend from high school's self absorbed insanity twenty years later. I was so annoyed that she just let someone who made her life hell back into her life and it all became about the "best friend" again. Playing a secondary character in her own life when this chick shows up again. Ugh...I liked it so little that I can't even remember the characters names. So, if this review made little sense, well, I apologize.
  • (2/5)
    To sum it up in one word. "Boring." This book was so unmemorable...all I can remember was that I was trying hard to finish it...there was no "depth" to the book- it was a little to unbelievable to me...not realistic at all, and not entertaining...perhaps a good read for the beach or light summer reading, but not something that would keep your interest for very long. I was very disappointed since I LOVED the film "In Her Shoes," which is based on one of her works, so I had high hopes for this book, but it just kinda fell flat.
  • (2/5)
    I enjoyed this book well enough although I spent much of the novel trying to figure out who the narrative voice reminded me of--Susan Isaacs, Janet Evanovich,or Carl Hiaasen perhaps. And I felt like the humor sat kind of uneasily in the novel. Like it really wanted to be or could have been a serious and meaningful novel but instead the author settled for trite and formulaic. Still, I think she has the potential to be a really good writer (I loved the details in the beginning about the two girls growing up) so I'm interested to read more of her books.
  • (4/5)
    Publishing industry professionals in this country declared the Chick Lit genre dead some years ago, forcing hordes of writers to reinvent themselves—at least on the surface. A novel written in Chick Lit’s distinctively snarky voice must now call itself women’s humorous contemporary fiction, or light women’s fiction, or any combination thereof, as long as the words “Chick Lit,” so offensively yesterday, are absent. First person point of view, intrinsic to the Chick Lit craze, is no longer acceptable in adult fiction. Unless you’re Jennifer Weiner.Which is a good thing. Just because the publishing industry begged for Chick Lit, got Chick Lit, got too much Chick Lit, and got sick of Chick Lit all within a decade or so, doesn’t mean there’s suddenly a shortage of women readers looking for the fluffy pink beach reads they’ve known and loved.Best Friends Forever (BFF) still has Weiner’s funny, everywoman’s voice, a plot that entertains like a cat zipping around the room after a laser pointer, and characters spiced with a finely balanced combination of angst-that-doesn’t-take-itself-too-seriously and plausible back-story.Fat Adelaide Downs and ditzy Valerie Alder are the products of normal American families, and by “normal,” I mean to say “highly dysfunctional.” As children, Addie and Val bond over their mutual, but unspoken, wish to belong to the other’s family. Addie is ashamed of her obese mother, who Val sees as the nurturing, supportive woman she is, and Val, with her filthy boys’ clothes, greasy hair and mossy teeth, somehow hides the fact that her mother is flat-out neglectful, while Addie sees her as glamorous and free-spirited.Was Ms. Weiner somehow privy to my own adolescence, or are there really that many former kids out there suppressing memories of a similar childhood? Stir the BFF characters’ early lives with an ugly stick, and you’ve got me and my best friend; we’ll call her Lesli, because that was her name. Les was a size-16 girl with a strikingly pretty face, whose mother was thin, polished, never-without-a-man, and drove a Trans Am. I was the neglected one with the obese mother, and alright, Les probably never wished she had my mom, but I sure wanted to exchange my hand-me-downs and thrift-store clothes, self-cut hair, and filthy apartment for her designer jeans, thick, waist-length brown hair and germ-free living conditions.I haven’t seen her in years, but if Les showed up on my doorstep tomorrow needing help because she thought she’d killed her high school date-rapist in a semi-deliberate hit-and-run, it’s unlikely I’d rob a bank and go on the lam with her, like Addie does for Val. Well, they don’t really rob a bank. Val just thinks they did, but I don’t want to pepper this review with too many spoilers. Suffice it to say, BFF won’t disappoint the majority of Ms. Weiner’s fans. Chick Lit may be D.O.A., but the void has been effectively filled with the exact same product, different name. (Review originally posted to Booksquawk)
  • (3/5)
    I really enjoyed the backstory and character development, but I thought the overall story was a bit weak and unrealistic. Love Weiner's books and her writing style, but this was just an okay one for me.
  • (3/5)
    I finally finished this book. It took 2 tries but, I made it haha! : )
  • (4/5)
    At first I wasn't sure what to make Addie and Val. Addie has such a rich interior life and Val seems so shallow. As the book went along I couldn't help but realize it's brilliant. Addie's metamorphosis from a woman who lets her life be decided by easy decisions to one who celebrates life is breathtaking.
  • (4/5)
    enjoyable, easy summer read but hated that it was abridged (I almost never pick them if abridged).
  • (4/5)
    I didn't love this as much as I've loved some of Weiner's other books, and I'm not sure why. The story requires a little more suspending of the disbelief than I'm comfortable with, maybe, and I think I had some trouble identifying with a narrator who is as little interested in vengeance as Addie is, even after what she's been through. The book is still a lot of fun, though, and even if I didn't like it as well as I've liked others of her books, I really did enjoy it.
  • (2/5)
    I'm not doing a spoiler when I say that promo copy for this book is way dishonest. What's her name--the cool, skinny girlhood friend--didn't accidentally kill anyone; you learn that in the first few pages. If this were a screenplay, you'd leave out this guy's boring trajectory and totally unbelievable Christian savior (Jennifer, fundamental Protestants, probably no Protestants, use rosary beads. They're not big on images either.). Leave out the disabled brother side story, throw in a little more about online dates. Maybe there would then a modicum of suspense, momentum.The tone is off with the pretty reckless friend, Val, though. Val thinks robbing a bank is a nifty idea? She's stupid enough to use credit cards? Aren't they supposed to be sharing, evolving or having fun on a road trip? The crazy character can work, if not hold a respectable job, but all the other characters and situations have to out-of-kilter tone too.Sigh. I'm interested in this genre because I think it would be easy to write this type of book (Yeah, yeah, I know but Weiner started off as a journalist as well). But how do you find the good ones? I've picked up some others and barely glanced because the sentence construction and stereotyping was so offensive. Also, acknowledgements and forewords are often riddled with punctuation errors. Weiner's grammar and punctuation are fine and sometimes she even gets a joke off.
  • (3/5)
    3.5 starsThis book was a quick and enjoyable read, and throughout most of my reading, I 4 star-liked it. But it was a little uneven, and the end third didn't pull together as well as I'd have liked. Still, it was fun, and I always appreciate books that instantly suck me in! :)
  • (3/5)
    I would consider this an easy summertime, beach read. Not very thought provoking and quite predictable. Not even a new story - high school friendship, betrayal, rediscovery of friendship. But a quick light read.
  • (2/5)
    This was better than I thought it was going to be, but that's not saying much. I would never have picked this book out for myself, it was given to me as a gift.I found a lot of the plot to be far-fetched stupid hijinx that no sane person would participate in. I felt the primary characters get the short end of the stick with plot resolution. "Everyone was happy THE END." Really? I don't think so.
  • (2/5)
    There were several aspects of this book that irked me and I think the biggest was how Jennifer Weiner gave Addie, her main character, binge eating disorder, and then did not address it at all. Valerie, her only friend, though one might argue not best, was shallow at best. The book seemed to be mostly about Addie's tragic family life and how she soothed herself with food and Valerie was a welcome distraction. A rift occurred when the girls were in high school and they parted. Addie stayed in the town, the house, where she grew up and gained more and more weight until she hit bottom and decided to loose weight. We really don't know what happened with Valerie in the intervening years, but we know she decided to attend her high school reunion, where one thing leads to another and she and Addie reunite and end up on the run.A lot of the story is told in flashback - some better than others...Addie and Valerie's trip to Cape Cod stands out as a highlight, but there isn't much as far as depth. The other main character, the police office Jordan serves more as a plot device than actual character and many aspects of his character make him unlikable so when the inevitable happens, we wonder if he was really needed at all or if the story would have been fine focusing on the two women.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book. I wouldn’t say I loved it like I do some of Weiner’s other works, but it was enjoyable. Goodreads describes this novel as hilarious and I disagree with that statement. This book was about broken relationships and it was heavy and not humorous.Addie and Valerie are the best of friends until they are torn about by high school shenanigans. After not speaking to each other for over 15 years, the two reunite under interesting circumstances and try to see if the close relationship they once had can be repaired.The novel was very engaging and read quickly. I found it to be well-written and interesting. It did lack a bit of punch. I think that is why the ratings of this novel are so low. I had the sense of something being missing, but not to the point that it caused me to dislike the book.I would recommend it to Weiner fans.
  • (4/5)
    A thoroughly enjoyable book for winter and recuperation. When they were both nine years old, Valerie Adler moves across the street from Addie Downs and they become fast friends. In high school something drove the two apart and Addie went on to become at stay at home artist for a greeting card company and Valerie went out into the world and became a TV weather person. Fifteen years later Valerie is back in town for the high school reunion. And late in the evening she shows up at Addie's door seeking her help. The story was a delight to read except for one or two events that I know could not have happened without consequences and therefore were unbelievable.
  • (3/5)
    I was all over the place with this book. For about the first third of it I wasn't sure I was going to like it, the second third I couldn't put it down, and then the ending left me feeling kind of...eh. For as much as this whole situation was built up throughout the entire story, I thought the ending left a lot to be desired. This was my first time reading Jennifer Weiner, and although this book didn't knock my socks off, I will definitely read her again. She has a very engaging writing style.
  • (3/5)
    A typical Weiner, nice, entertaining, flat characters and utterly predictable. I liked it! (Although I kept wondering why the police would want to spend so much time on a vague crime no one cares about...)
  • (3/5)
    Enjoyable, but not amazing.
  • (3/5)
    A gentle read focusing on two women who have grown up as best friends, then grew apart after a traumatic event in highschool. Now they are brought together again 10 years later, with one seeking the others help. I found this book kind of depressing; altho I suppose readers of this genre expect a bit of tear jerking to be included in the story. I didn't like Addie much either - we are meant to sympathize with her poor, beaten-down, overweight soul. However, myself being a person of size, I'm irritated by her lack of self esteem. It seems so many stories these days focus on the poor fat girl who makes no friends and can't get significant others. I reject this idea whole-heartedly. It has nothing to do with your size, it has to do with your personality. I sympathize with her shyness - not her size. Ok, end rant. Gentle read, happy ending, women's lives and relationships genre. I feel like maybe the author tried to include too many intertwining story lines here, instead of focusing on one subject. I feel that if she had focused more, she would have a more defined story, instead of the wandering tale she has given us. Overall - meh. Sweet, but unremarkable.
  • (5/5)
    A heart warming story of quiet, beautiful Addie Downs and her best friend, pretty and popular Valerie Adler. This book illustrates a wonderful tale of friendships, love, betrayal, forgiveness, and life. It will make you laugh, make you cry, and revive your soul. You have to read it!Timid Addie Downs was a fat girl, always teased and harassed by her classmates. Her only friend was skinny and outgoing Valerie Adler who's friends with almost everyone. They were best friends, doing everything together, until a horrifying event one night at a typical high school party. The two girls stopped talking to each other, each wallowing in their own self pity. So they grew older, and Addie became a stay-at-home greeting card artist, while Valerie went on and got the job as the local weather girl. Things were fine for both of them, until Valerie came knocking at Addie's door one night after committing a horrible crime. After Valerie confesses what she did, they both decided to put their complicated past aside and run away together. So what will happen if shy Addie Downs and her ex-best friend, wild Valerie Adler, come together once again to go on an adventure of their lifetime? Will their old, rusted friendship evolve into a new one?
  • (3/5)
    From the first chapter this story grabs your attention and doesn't let go as you're taken on this journey with two friends who reunite. Unfortunately for the reader, the second half of the book runs out of steam and never gets its groove back. Good beach read, but certainly not as good as her previous books.
  • (1/5)
    Trite and trivial. Poorly developed, unbelievable and with an unlikely ending. On my list as a reminder not to read anything else by this author.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely my least favorite book of hers, but still worth reading...
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed reading this book. It was an easy read, and had many fun twist and turns. I loved Addie's charecter in this book, and I found myself thinking of a girl like that whom I grew up with. I was a little disappointed in the ending, hoping that Weiner would develop Jordan's character just a little bit more to make the ending seem like it really "fit". Overall a great read, and will definitely be reading more of her work!