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Henry's Freedom Box

Henry's Freedom Box

Por Ellen Levine

Narrado por Jerry Dixon


Henry's Freedom Box

Por Ellen Levine

Narrado por Jerry Dixon

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (90 valoraciones)
Longitud:
10 minutos
Publicado:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9780545521369
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Henry dreams of a world where his life belongs to him. But when his family is sold, he risks everything for what he knows is right. With the strength and conviction of the best kind of hero, Henry makes a harrowing journey in a wooden crate—and mails himself to freedom!

Publicado:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9780545521369
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Ellen Levine is the author of many books, including Henry's Freedom Box, a Caldecott Honor book, and Darkness Over Denmark, which was a National Jewish Book Award finalist and was awarded the Trudi Birger Jerusalem International Book Fair Prize. Her book Freedom's Children won the Jane Addams book award and was named one of the Ten Best Children's Books of the Year by the New York Times. Levine is a woodcarver and a lapsed civil-rights lawyer, and she taught at Vermont College's Master of Fine Art in Writing for Children and Young Adults program.

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4.5
90 valoraciones / 102 Reseñas
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  • (4/5)
    Tells some many true details, but it's not overburdened for young children. This definitely opens the "box" for many questions and discussions.
  • (4/5)
    Reading this book with your children will help introduce the topic of our nation's history with slavery through the character of Henry. Recommend!
  • (5/5)
    Summary:This story starts out with a slave boy named Henry who wishes to be free. Henry, like most slaves will never know their true birthday. Henry is a hard worker who is later sold to another master. As Henry gets older he is allowed to marry another slave, in which he starts a family with her. His wife and kids are later sold and he decides to escape. With help Henry comes up with a plan to mail himself to a place where slavery was not allowed. Henry's plan is successful and the day he arrives in Pennsylvania is the day Henry officially becomes free. This is the day Henry considers his birthday.Personal Reflection:This story just touched my heart. I feel like I was in the story cheering Henry on. The story with the realistic pictures just makes it all work together. It's no wonder it received a Caldecott Award. I am glad that slavery is behind us and we have grown together as a nation to never bring it back.Classroom Extension Ideas: 1. While studying slavery in history class this would be a great book to read and show the children that slavery was life changing.2. As a class we can talk about their feelings on slavery and why they think it was right or wrong.3. We can discuss how they would feel to not be able to know when their birthday was.
  • (4/5)
    Great book to teach small children about slavery and the underground railroad. Henry mails himself to freedom in this inspiring and honest story.
  • (5/5)
    I would use this book as a read aloud for 2nd and 3rd grade students. I would use this book to teach the underground railroad and slavery in a social studies class. This book could also be used in a lesson about how mailing something works.I think students would like this book because it is about a person with determination and drive to make a better life for themselves. The illustrations are very captivating as well.This book could also be used with standard, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.3, this standard is describe how characters respond to major events and challenges in a text. Henry is constantly challenged in this story and he responds by mailing himself to freedom.
  • (5/5)
    A sad and touching true story that I think is important for all kids to hear. I would use this story to teach about the Underground Railroad, story progression, main character, and vocabulary.
  • (4/5)
    Ellen Levine, the author of numerous historical and biographical works for young people, including a number of entries in the If You... series - If Your Name Was Changed At Ellis Island, If You Lived With The Iroquois, If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad - turns her attention to the story of escaped slave Henry Box Brown in this award-winning picture-book. Born a slave in antebellum Virginia, Henry Brown was parted from his mother and family at a young age, and sent to work at a tobacco factory in Richmond. Here he met and fell in love with Nancy, a follow slave, and having obtained the permission of their respective owners, they married, and had three children together. But one terrible day, when Nancy's owner sold her and the children away from Richmond, Henry knew that - for the second time in his life - he would never see his family again. It was then that he conceived of his daring escape plan - to ship himself north to freedom in a box - a plan that would make him an Abolitionist celebrity, and earn him his middle name...I knew nothing about Henry's Freedom Box before it was chosen by the Picture-Book Club to which I belong as one of our February selections, in honor of Black History Month; nor had I ever heard of Henry Box Brown. How glad I am that this omission has been rectified! Levine's narrative is a moving one, emphasizing the inhumanity of slavery, and the courage of those who rebelled against it. Young readers will be enthralled, as they follow Henry's perilous journey north. I myself came away with a desire to know more, and will try to track down Brown's own (adult) narrative. The artwork by Kadir Nelson, done in pencil, watercolor and oil, won him a Caldecott Honor in 2008, an award that was richly deserved! His colors are deep, his use of light adept, and his underlying pencil lines create an impression of depth and texture that is very appealing.Highly recommended to anyone looking for good picture-books about slavery and the Underground Railroad, as well as to all Kadir Nelson fans!
  • (5/5)
    Henry is a slave that is given to his master's son. He works hard and finds a wife and even though they have different masters they live together and have a family. But family didn't mean anything to slave owners and while at work one day Henry finds out his wife and children are sold. The illustrations enhance the commentary of this true story. The reader can see the feelings of the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Ellen Devine's Henry's Freedom Box is a book that tugs at all emotions. It makes one angry, sad, despairing, happy. Above all, it should make any reasonable, any compassionate human being indignant at the inhumanity of slavery and strive for liberty, justice and equality for all. In fact, I think that this book should be required reading in every elementary school classroom, not only in the United States of America, but globally.The fact that Henry Brown has basically no rights, that slaves are considered mere property and can be sold as though they are furniture, horses, cows etc. is both mind-boggling and an assault on all that is decent. And that Henry would be willing to actually mail himself in a wooden crate to an area of the United States where there is no slavery, in spite of the extreme danger of this undertaking to both life and limb, shows how desperate Henry is, how inhumane, how cruel slavery and the concept of slavery is. I do like the fact that Henry is helped in his endeavour by not only his friend James, but also by Dr. Smith, a white man who is against slavery, although I do wonder why Dr. Smith does not offer to travel to Philadelphia with the box; it would have made Henry's trip both safer and more comfortable.The illustrations by Kadir Nelson literally take your breath away. They are a wonderful complement to the story, to Ellen Levine's words, and really underline the cruelty of slavery, the despair that slavery and the inhumane actions of many of the slave owners have on those affected; one only has to look at Henry's sadness and his emotional pain when he looses his family (not only once, but twice). Another bonus is that both illustrations and narrative manage to successfully convey the cruelty of slavery without the use of either overtly violent illustrations or words. The fact that the violent aspects of slavery are never overtly or graphically shown (although they are always implied, always lurking in the backgorund) makes Henry's Freedom Box suitable for both younger and older children.I have to admit that I have a bit of a problem with Henry Brown being called a "runaway" slave. I know this is likely very much a personal dislike of the word, but whenever I hear or read the word "runaway" in conjunction with slave, it leaves a bit of a stigma and an air of negativity (as though Henry and other escaping slaves are actually doing something wrong, which in my mind is simply not the case, as they are escaping from situations, scenarios that are both morally and ethically criminal and inhumane). My LT friend Abigail calls Henry "Box" Brown an Abolitionist celebrity in her excellent review, and that is a much more fitting and appropriate description in my opinion; one might even call Henry "Box" Brown an Abolitionist hero (but calling him a "runaway" slave really does seem to give the impression that Henry Brown is somehow doing something not all together acceptable, which, in my opinion, is rather unfortunate).While I generally enjoyed the author's note and am happy that one has been included, I do feel that Ellen Levine has not given us nearly enough details. As I knew virtually nothing about Henry "Box" Brown before reading this book, I would have appreciated more historical information in the author's note, both about Henry's life as a slave, but especially about his life after freedom, his life in Philadelphia. More historical detail would have also made this book even more of a teaching resource to and for teachers using or intending to use Henry's Freedom Box in the classroom (or parents reading with/to their children), as the story will undoubtedly engender both discussion and many questions. But all-in-all, a wonderful, moving, and important picture book, and one that should be read by every child, and in my humble opinion, every adult as well.
  • (4/5)
    Henry Brown was a slave who, after his wife and children were sold away from him, was determined to escape to freedom in the North. With the help of some friends, Henry mails himself in a box to abolitionists in Philadelphia. While the story is inspirational, it's the illustrations that make this a standout. Kadir Nelson, who received the Caldecott Honor for this, used pencil, watercolor and oil to create earthy, brown-dominated illustrations that have depth and texture. An author's note at the end of the book talks briefly about slavery and the Underground Railroad and fleshes out the story of Henry Brown a little more. I did feel the story was a little incomplete because the author's note doesn't really say what became of Henry Brown - it only focuses on this event and how the world reacted to it. Still, this could be tied into school lessons in a ton of ways and might inspire students to do some research on what happened to Henry Brown after he made it to Philadelphia.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This is one of the best children's books I have ever read. I truly love this story. This story is about a young man named Henry that grew up in slavery and after his master died he thought he and his mother were going to be freed but that did not happen. He was sold to the slave market and when Henry grew up and got married and had kids he was happy and sang everyday. Then his wife and kids we're sold off by the new master and Henry's never sung again. He was determined to be free. With the help of one of his slave friends and a white abolitionist doctor and nailed himself in a wooden box all the way to Philadelphia where there is no slavery. Although there wasn't any records of slaves birth, Henry chose to use the day he made it to Philadelphia as his birthday!Personal Reaction: When I first read this to all I could think was absolutely amazing! Although Henry never got to see his wife and kids again, he was still determined that if he had to live he wanted to live a a free man and not a slave and with faith and determination he made that dream a reality.Classroom extension: 1. I would read this book to my class around Black History Month and have the students write how they think like would have been like around this time in the world during slavery. 2. I would find a wooden box the same exact size and shape as the one in this story and have each student sit in it and see who could last the longest and after this experience how did they feel just sitting there without a break or someone to talk to and how did they think Henry might have felt to travel alone in a box from the south all the way to the north in the tiny box.
  • (5/5)
    This book presents it reader with plenty of emotion. The reader really connects with Henry from the first page when he is staring directly back at you. It was a great story with many ups and downs but in the end everything was right.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This Caldecott award winning book is based on a real runaway slave man from the Underground Railroad named Henry "Box" Brown. The author starts off with Henry not having a birthday. He is with his mother who is a slave, and they end up getting separated. As he gets older, Henry meets Nancy, who end up getting married and having children. As the slave master is low on money, he decides to sale Nancy and her children. Henry is separated from his family, and he becomes determined to runaway and be a free man. His friends help him hide in a box and be shipped off to a free state, thus receiving his middle name "Box". The story ends with Henry finally getting a birthday, which is the day of his freedom. Personal Reaction: This was a great book. With history insight and personal information, it gives the reader that intimate feeling with the main character. Classroom Extension Ideas:A. This book is meant for an upper elementary class. This would be an excellent book to read in a history class that is on the topic of slavery and the Underground Railroad. B. Also, this would be a great book to discuss other great African American leaders who helped end slavery.
  • (4/5)
    This book tells the story of the path taken by a young slave, Henry, to freedom. After being taken from his mother to work for his master's son, Henry finds a wife and has children only to have them taken from him. After the heartbreak of losing his family Henry vows to escape to the freedom of the north. With the help of a local doctor they devise a plan to ship Henry in a crate to friends of the doctors in Philadelphia.Although some facts were altered or left out by the author, this book is based on the true story of a slave who mailed himself to freedom. I enjoyed this book and could see it being used in an upper elementary school class when studying this part of American history.
  • (5/5)
    This true story iws themed around slavery and segregation. I would use this book in my classroom when we have a unit on slavery or discrimination. I like this book because it is a true story of a boy who went through these tragic events. I would recommend this book to children in grades 2-5.
  • (4/5)
    This is a wonderful book about a boy named Henry who grew up as a slave and then was freed as a n adult by mailing himself to the north. I found it really interesting that this was a true story. I didn't find this information out until I had finished reading it. One aspect I liked specially about this book was Henry's references to birds and how they are free things.
  • (5/5)
    Summary:Historical fiction book depicting Henry's escape to freedom from slavery following the sale of his family. In this book, Henry mails himself north to where he can live free.Personal Reflection:This was an amazing retelling of a man's journey to freedom. The author did a wonderful job of making this story real. I found my heart breaking for Henry when his family was taken from him, and cheering for him when he emerged safely at the end. The story became very personal instead of simply being a cold paragraph in a history textbook somewhere.Classroom Extension:- This book would work well during a social studies unit involving the Underground Railroad, the Civil War era, or the realities of slavery.
  • (5/5)
    Review: This book is about a boy named Henry who is a slave. As a young boy Henry lived with his mother and brothers and sisters in a big house as a slave for a master. One day the master decided to take Henry away from his family and he gave him to his son to be a slave. When Henry got older he met Nancy a slave for another master. They got married and had three children living together working under two different masters. During lunch time one day Henry found out that his wife and children had been sold at the slave market. Henry knew he would never see any of his family again. Henry wanted to be free, so he got one of his slave friends and a white man to help him mail himself in a box to a place where there are no slaves. Henry was put in the box and went through hard travels to get to Pennsylvania where he would be free. Once Henry got there he was greeted by friendly men who gave him his birthdate which was his first day of freedom. Genre: Historical FictionGenre Critique: This story is based off of the true story of how Henry "Box" Brown escaped to freedom in the mid 1800's. This story contains some but not all of the events that took place during Henry Brown's life of how he escaped to freedom. The author paints a very clear picture of his life and the events seem very real and true. Setting Critique: The setting of this book is very clear. It is clear that the story takes place during the mid 1800's during the time of the underground railroad. The illustrations in the book and the wording in the book also help to creating the setting and the time of when this story took place.
  • (3/5)
    Summary:Henry started off as a young boy who was a slave. While he was young, his master became ill and gave him to his son. Henry was then separated from his family and started to work for his new master. He, one day, met another slave by the name of Nancy. He and Nancy got married and had children. He was soon separated by his family because his wife and kids were sold. He wanted to become free so he decided to pack himself in a box and get shipped to a place where there were no slaves. He was shipped in a box to Philadelphia where he had friends. When he arrived to Philadelphia, Henry was given his first birthday along with the name Henry Box Brown.Personal Reaction:I had mixed feelings about this story. I liked it because it was history but it was also somewhat depressing to me. I'm not a big fan on hearing about slavery because it's a sad situation. I do however like how the illustrations were so vivid.Classroom Extension:1. In the classroom, the teacher could have their students share their feelings on slavery.2. In the classroom, the teacher could have a discussion on slavery.
  • (3/5)
    Summary:Henry was born into slavery. His master was ill and handed Henry to his son. As the years went by, Henry met Nancy who became his wife and had children. Their master was losing money and he decided to sell Nancy and the children to the slave market. Henry was hurt and upset. He decided to get shipped to a free state in a box. Henry arrived in Philadelphia, which is how he got the name "Henry Box Brown".Personal Reaction:I thought it was a great story. I really liked how the author made it very approaiate for children to understand what happened back in the mid 1800s. I also enjoyed the pictures and how Henry had a friend that helped him.Classroom Extension:1.I would use this book as part of a lesson plan for slavery.2.I would have students write a reflection paper on their opinion of how Henry felt.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This story is about a a young boy who is a slave and his master because ill and he gives his slaves to his son. Henry is sent to do something and meets a girl and they ask their masters if they can get married and the masters agree. They have some babies and then one day the wife tells the husband that her master is going broke. While Hnery is at work he learns that his family has been sold he goes to look for them and when he gets there they have already been sold. He then decides he wants to find away be free. So with the help of James and a white man who didn't agree with slavery they mail him to Pennsylvania and on his way he gets tipped over and over and finally when he gets to Pennsylania he now has a birthday and name Henry Box Brown. Personal Reaction: I really liked this story it was sad when Henry lost his family but in the end made it a happy story when he finally became free.Classroom Extenison:1. I could use this book to talk about the Underground Railroad.2. We could have a class discussion about what we would if we were Henry.
  • (3/5)
    Henry's Freedom Box by Ellen Levine is a biography about Henry "Box" Brown, an African American slave from the 19th century. The book tells the story of how he grew up as a slave, and when he grew up, he shipped himself in a crate to the North so that he could find freedom. It is a very encouraging story about a brave man who faced the hardships of discrimination and cruelty in the United States. It is a great biography picture book for children, especially when they begin learning about the history of our country and slavery. This book would allow children to read about a real person's experience with slavery. In the classroom you could use this book to have children then write a letter to the main character of this book and ask him certain things about his circumstances.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: Henry Brown was a slave from the minute he was born. Even though his master had treated his family well, there was still no freedom for him. When he grew up, he eventually started his own family but unfortuneately, he would soon lose his loved ones when they were sold without a second thought by his wife's master. Never able to see them again, he made the decision to go to Philadelphia for his freedom, even if he had to put himself in a box and mail himself there, which is just what he did.Personal Reaction: This book is amazing, there's just no question. The story is moving and the picutres are deserving of the Caldecott Award. This book's story must be told to young children to show them what slavery drove some people to do.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Read this book on the first of February to help explain the meaning of Black History Month.2. Have the students to look up (with their parents' help) and bring in a picture of another slave who escaped to freedom.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: When Henry Brown was a young boy he was a slave to a master that treated his family well, yet they were still slaves. One day the master was sick and he gave Henry to his son. Henry was taken away from his family and wasn't treated as well by his new master. As he grew up he met a woman that he would marry. As time went by Henry and his wife had children. While Henry was working his wife and children were sold. Knowing he would never see his family again, he devised a plan to mail himself, in a crate, to Philadelphia. The people that he was shipped to were friends of a white man that helped Henry and shipped the crate containing him. In Philadelphia he was free!Personal Reaction:This is a must have book! It is a wonderful story that tells some of what happened to slaves.Classroom Extension Ideas: 1. This book can be used during Black History Month to help explain some of what happened to slaves.2. Can be used to start a conversation about the Underground Railroad.
  • (5/5)
    Summary:This is a story that tells about a slave boy Henry, who rolled Tobacco for his master. One day his family got taken away from him, so he decided that he was going to mail himself to Pennsylvania to gain freedom. Despite being stuck in a box for days, he succeeds in making it to Pennsylvania and gains his freedom.Personal Reaction:I thought this book was a good way to introduce children to slavery. I thought it was a really cute story that I thought kids can easily understand. It is also told in a way that is interesting, and hopefully would make the kids want to learn more about the history of slavery.Extension Ideas:1) Have this book as an opener to a lesson plan on starting slavery. Use this book to discuss the Underground Railroad, and how people lived in those times through slavery.2) Have the class write in their daily journal how they would have felt if they was Henry, and what they would have done to obtain freedom like Henry did.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: Henry's family gets taken from him and he has to work at a warehouse. He grows up and gets married but then his new family gets taken from him as well at the slave market. He finds a crate at the warehouse and decides to mail himself to Philadelphia for freedom. This is a long journey for him to be stuck in his box. He finally reaches freedom, the happiest day of his life.Personal Reaction:I love the point of view from this book. I love how it is from Henry's point of view and it tells about his story of freedom. It made learning about slavery more interesting because history books can be so boring.Classroom Extension:1. This book would be a great way to start a history lesson about slavery.2. I would ask my students how they thought Henry felt while he was a slave and have them make their own Freedom Box.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:Henry is a slave that was dealing with all of the horrors slaves dealt with. He watches his family get taken from him, and decides it's enough. Henry wants to be free. So he decides to get a box and mail himself to a place without slavery. With a little bit of help he is boxed up and shipped off to Pensylvania. After a wild ride Henry is finally free.Personal Reaction:This is an amazing a touching book. This is a book at is heart wrenching at times. It's so much better than your typical history book. I loved the story, and the way it worked out in the end.Classroom Applications:1. Talk about slavery.2. Have everyone make a freedom box.
  • (5/5)
    Levine, Ellen. Henry's Freedom Box. New York: Scholastic Press, 2007. This facinating story is the true story of a slave named Henry Brown. He grows up as a slave but marries and has a family. Unfortunately, his whole family gets sent away to another owner. He dreams of being free and decides to ship himself to Philadephia. This story shows what he felt going through that ordeal. It is suspenseful and I found myself holding my breath. The illustrations are realistic and reveal so much emotion. It left me cheering for Henry. Age Group: 9-11years.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This is a story of Little Henry growing up in slavery. He is taken away from his mother and family when he is given to his master’s son. He isn’t happy until he meets Nancy, another slave from a different master. He and Nancy soon marry and have three children together. Unfortunately, Nancy and the children wind up getting sold. Henry is very depressed after this and wants nothing more than to be free. He gets with some friends and come up with a plan. Henry and his friends decide that he will be mailed to Philadelphia. The two men nail Henry in a box and send him off. Henry is tossed around but finally arrives safely. Henry is then a free man.Personal Reaction: I really enjoyed this book because it shows children how the families were separated during slavery even if they were married and had kids, or even if they were a kid themselves. The pictures in this book are not very bright, but slavery is not a bright subject.Classroom Extension Idea:1.This book would be great for talking about slavery with a younger group because it tells all about it but doesn’t give the gory details to go along with it.
  • (5/5)
    Henry's Freedom Box is a true story about a slave named Henry Brown who shipped himself in a crate from Virginia to Pennsylvania. The book captures Henry's story in a way that children can enjoy and understand. My students love to hear about the conditions Henry suffered in the box on his journey. After reading the book, I always have my students imagine they are Henry and write about their journey to freedom. They make great stories!