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In Her Shoes

In Her Shoes

Escrito por Jennifer Weiner

Narrado por Barbara McCulloh


In Her Shoes

Escrito por Jennifer Weiner

Narrado por Barbara McCulloh

valoraciones:
4/5 (73 valoraciones)
Longitud:
15 horas
Publicado:
Mar 15, 2011
ISBN:
9781442342408
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descripción

Meet Rose Feller. She's thirty years old and a high-powered attorney with a secret passion for romance novels. She dreams of a man who will slide off her glasses, gaze into her eyes, and tell her that she's beautiful. She also dreams of getting her fantastically screwed-up little sister to get her life. together.
Meet Rose's sister, Maggie. Twenty-eight years old, drop-dead gorgeous and only occasionally employed. Although her dreams of big-screen stardom haven't progressed, Maggie dreams of fame and fortune -- and of getting her dowdy big sister to stick to a skin-care regime.
These two women with nothing in common but childhood tragedy, shared DNA, and the same size feet, are about to learn that their family is more different than they ever imagine, and that they're more alike, than they'd ever believe. In Her Shoes observes Rose and Maggie, the brain and the beauty, as they make journeys of discovery. Along the way, the'll encounter a wild cast of characters and they'll borrow shoes and clothes and boyfriends, and make peace with their most intimate enemies -- each other.
Funny and poignant, In Her Shoes will speak to anyone who has endured the bonds of big -- or little -- sisterhood, or longed for a life different from the one the world has dictated, and dreamed of trying something else on for size.
Publicado:
Mar 15, 2011
ISBN:
9781442342408
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eighteen books, including Good in Bed, That Summer, and an essay collection, Hungry Heart: Adventures in Life, Love, and Writing. A graduate of Princeton University and contributor to the New York Times Opinion section, Jennifer lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com.

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4.0
73 valoraciones / 53 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (3/5)
    Great sister story.
  • (4/5)
    Maggie is the prodigal daughter and Rose is the put upon older sister, forced to care for Maggie when she screws up (which is more often than not). Yet it's Maggie who pushes Rose out of her comfort zone (while developing a little maturity for herself in the process), and strengthens the sisterly bond.
  • (3/5)
    A light easy read.
  • (2/5)
    The voice of the narrator didn’t do it for me. I couldn’t get into the story. It impacted the flow and vibe. Otherwise a good enough story
  • (4/5)
    In Her Shoes by Jennifer WeinerRose is a lawyer, she wants to exercise and loves romance books.Maggie sings in a band and dreams her own dreams.The brain and the beauty and learn they do have a grandmother. Story also follows their grandmother. The girls try to figure out what happened to their grandmother that was in a home....So many secrets over the years and how they are reunited....
  • (4/5)
    I won't lie, I wasn't expecting much out of this book. In fact, I didn't even want to read it, if it wasn't for my book club I never would have picked it up. I'm not big into chick-lit and the whole premise of this book sounded uninteresting. I'm glad to report that I was very wrong!The story follows two sisters who can't be more dissimilar. Rose is the responsible older sister who went to college, landed a great job at a law firm, she has the brains. Maggie on the other hand is irresponsible, can't ever hold down a job, and has a learning disability. She may not have the brains but she has the amazing body that her frumpy sister always dreamed about. Maggie loses her job, gets evicted, and has to say with Rose until she can turn her luck around. Rose is at her wits end and finally snaps when she catches her freeloading sister having sex with her boyfriend. Rose unceremoniously kicks them both to the curb and tries to come to term with what happened. Maggie on the other hand has no place to go and sleeps from place to place until she ends up finding her long lost grandmother in Florida.This story is about a sisters love and how much it can handle before it breaks. But does it ever truly go away? Is sister's bond for life?Really not bad for chick lit. I look forward to watching the movie!
  • (5/5)
    "Awesome! I read the book after the movie...do both! Worth it!"
  • (3/5)
    Not as bad as I thought it might be - an easy read for the summer when you are sitting in the sun, barely awake. I hear it's a movie... might be worth checking out.
  • (4/5)
    A fun read about a lawyer and her spacey sister and how they turn their lives around in a chick lit welter of borrowed clothes and, of course, shoes.
  • (2/5)
    Too long, too long, too long! Someone was really working overtime to when he/she saw a movie in this. The movie is so much better than the book. There is a whole section in this book where the bad sister ends up at Princeton and learns to very much then goes to Florida and seems to have reverted back to the person she was before. The sisters never seem to resolve things between them and the grandmother never explains to the girls why she had no contact with them for so long even though it seems to bother her a lot. Weiner has written books I liked much better.
  • (5/5)
    I liked the book and really loved the movie! I've seen it numerous times. Loved the characters, especially the 2 sisters. Laced with humor throughout, the story also tugs at the heartstrings!
  • (4/5)
    I did read it and released but because of the sequel I decided to buy another copy so I can read both.

    Read this in 2004
    On September 19 I wrote:

    Yesterday I had to travel and the book I was reading was to heavy to take with me so i decided to take In her Shoes with me instead.
    Well I could not put it down.
    I think i like this even better, or just as much as Jennifer Weiner's first novel. Good in Bed.

    Like you I was also getting annoyed by maggie's selfishness.
    Right now I am at page 352 out of 442 (Rose receives a letter from Maggie, telling her she is staying at her grandmother) and I will finish this book today.

    I know one thing for sure: I want to read jennifer Weiner's next book I am planning to buy this book because i really want to re read.
  • (3/5)
    Saw this one sitting on the shelf at the library and thought that it might be good since I liked the movie. It was OK. The story line was a little too herky-jerky for me and I didn't feel a connection to either character (which for me is important).
  • (3/5)
    From the very beginning of this book, I had a hard time liking Maggie. The way she treats Rose is just awful. Because of that I had a hard time understanding why Rose was so forgiving and patient with her. Maybe I don't understand that kind of sisterly relationship because I don't have a sister myself. Or maybe I'm just cold-hearted! I also thought both characters could have been developed a little more. They both change a lot over the course of the book but I didn't feel like the impetus for the change in either of them was explored enough.I especially liked the scenes that took place at the retirement home. I thought Mrs. Lefkowitz, a blunt and spunky eighty-something year old retiree, was really funny. Overall, I found In Her Shoes to be an enjoyable feel-good novel.I listened to the audio book version of In Her Shoes which is narrated by Barbara McCulloh. I thought she did a great job with the narration. She had an upbeat, almost sassy style of reading that fit perfectly with the tone of the book. This book is a good choice for listening to in the car.
  • (5/5)
    Touching, earnest, and uplifting. What more could anyone want in a beach or bathtub novel?
  • (3/5)
    I normally would not read this type of book but I was out of the country and the apartment I was in had this book. It was a quick read and entertained me. It was a predictable story and cliche ridden throughout. I gave it 3 stars because it did not bore me, but I would not read anything by the author again(of course if this all I had to read, then it is better than nothing)
  • (3/5)
    ***Some spoilers ahead***Typically, this isn't my kind of book, but it was one of those the right book for the right time scenarios. I had just finished reading Nineteen Eighty-Four and Fahrenheit 451 and, suffering a bit of a literary hangover after an over indulgence in dystopian fiction, needed something light that didn't involve too much thinking. This certainly fit the bill. From the get-go we have a stereotypical plot: two sisters (one pretty but dumb and the other smart but plain) who are insanely jealous of one another despite their bond. However, this stereotype exists because there is a component of jealousy in many same-gender sibling relationships. No matter how much the two love one another, siblings often feel as though they are being compared to one another by parents, family, friends, society at large, and examined for deficiencies that become obvious when compared against their genetic foil. The smart one always wants to be pretty; the pretty one always wants to be smart. The athletic one always wants to be smarter; the smarter one always wants to be able to dunk a basketball. The one with curly hair always wants straight hair; the one with straight hair longs for curly locks. We end up envying precisely what the other hates or loathes in himself or herself. Maggie and Rose are no exception. There's some rich material to work with here, and Weiner does realistically portray the root causes of the sisters' envy for one another. She also takes some chances: further complicating their relationship is the death of their mother, whose mental illness leads to her death while the girls are still young; the beautiful Maggie suffers from a debilitating learning disability that effectively limits her chances at success in the entertainment industry (she can't read the teleprompter during an MTV audition that she would have otherwise had in the bag); Maggie betrays Rose's trust to such a magnitude that their relationship may be beyond repair (no one can hurt you like a sister and Weiner takes advantage of the opportunity to challenge the sisters' relationship). Oh, and thank heavens she didn't take the route of making the overweight Rose thin by the end.Having said all of that, there were certainly some things I did not love. There's a subplot involving the long-lost maternal grandmother that slowed down the narrative for me. Also, Maggie and Rose just weren't likable characters. These are not two women I would ever want to know in real life. They're self-involved and often petty. I'm also not buying that Rose quit her job to become a dog walker, nor that Maggie lives in the Princeton library and miraculously becomes a literary genius (by the novel's end, Maggie's reading every great literary classic she can get her hands on and spouting poetry like a water fountain). I'm not saying that someone with a learning disability is incapable of doing this, only that Weiner never plausibly made me believe Maggie was capable of doing this. If there was one perk of the inclusion of Maggie's reading of One Art by Elizabeth Bishop, i carry your heart with me(i carry it in by E. E. Cummings, and several classic literature texts, it's that it reminded me that there are certainly better books out there and, even though Weiner's work was somewhat humorous and mildly entertaining, maybe my time would be better served reading some of those.
  • (4/5)
    Sisters Rose and Maggie find, through admittedly unpleasant circumstances, their grandmother, new directions for their lives, and an unexpected understanding of each other. Very good - I cried at the end... :)
  • (4/5)
    The pretty, skinny sister constantly borrows her clothes but can't hold down a job or stay in a relationship. Their grandmother has been missing from their lives since their mother died and they don't know why.Everybody gets toget her and live happily ever after.BUT why does the lawyer sister work for the firm of LEWIS, ***, and ***, and the grandmother's boyfriend's first name is Lewis. Aren't there enough different names in this world????
  • (5/5)
    I wasn't expecting a whole lot from a "chick lit" book, but I was pleasantly surprised by this book. The author has an excellent writing style, the characters were well-drawn and relatable, and the story was more intelligent that I was expecting. I would recommend this for others interested in stories about family relations and/or relationships in general.
  • (3/5)
    Yes I read it! Leave me alone about it. ;)
  • (4/5)
    I didn't expect to like this book, but I did. Weiner did a great job with her character development and the plotline was absolutely solid.I'd recommend this over the movie any day of the week.
  • (4/5)
    There were quite a few significant differences from the movie, and I have to say this is one of the few times that I preferred the movie version. But the story is engaging and it's a quick read. Great for times when you want something light, albeit predictable. 
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book I have read by Jennifer Weiner. I didn't know what to expect. By the middle to the book I had a good idea on how it would end. That didn't stop me from reading it. I wouldn't rave about this book but it was a delightful easy read. What I like most about this book is the characters weren't perfect. They had flaws like everyone does. After reading the first few pages I thought it was going to be like every "chick-lit" novel and discuss all the intimate details of their sexual experience and how perfect he was and she was. Jennifer touched on the topics. She didn't kept it on the back burner and didn't make it a big part of the story. I enjoyed that about this book. Will I read another one of Jennifer Weiner? I wouldn't go out of my way and look for it, but if I happen to come across one I may pick it up. Over all I enjoyed the book more that librarything said that I would.
  • (4/5)
    There is probably a feminist polemic to be written about the marketing of perfectly decent women's novels as chicklit, but don't look at me, I can't be arsed. The Amazon reviewers, by and large, sum up the problem pretty well, so ask them. I will only re-state my vague irritation with the way that characters in books, in times of job crisis, invariably find some quirky solution to plug the gap in the job market. The dyslexic younger sister's character changes come rather too swiftly and confusingly to be believable, but the author gets full points for allowing the elder sister to remain normal-sized – and to gain an ordinary-looking, but delightful, husband, about whose parents I would love to hear much, much more.
  • (4/5)
    This is my second Weiner book (the first being the popular Good In Bed), and I must say her writing is some of the most indulgent I've ever come across. The author insertion is so obvious - all the characters are Weiner (or her opposite, or a person she wishes she knew) in a different costume. The thing that separates her books from your average teen-penned romance is that her themes are so universal that author insertion becomes reader insertion. You see her characters and think, "That's me. That's my life." Therein lies her appeal.As with most chick lit, the plot was fluff and totally predictable from the start, but that did not make it any less enjoyable. Rose is the older, successful, overweight sister. Maggie is the younger, trouble-making, gorgeous sister. Throw in an intersecting story about an elderly woman named Ella who lives in Florida with her entertaining neighbors at the Golden Acres senior citizen community and you have a fun little romp of a story.My only real complaint about this book was the all too convenient flashbacks. Too often someone would make some comment which would be followed by an explanation of some childhood event or something they "always" did, which for whatever reason had never been mentioned before. One glaring example of this was Sydelle's strict adherence to the Jewish faith, which was never brought up until it became an issue. Such "oh by the way" moments made it feel like the character development was done on the fly.All the same, this was a fun, quick read. Weiner's always good for one-liners and amusing exchanges, and a happy ending is guaranteed. I don't imagine most men would enjoy this book (though I think it could teach them a lot about the female psyche), but I would definitely recommend it to any woman looking for little bit of literary candy.
  • (3/5)
    I really enjoyed the story, although I found Maggie incredibly irritating. I still felt I did feel that some parts could be more explained or rather left a bit unanswered. For example, I wish I had more information about her mother's death, and why her father kept them away from the grandmother.Overall, it was very engaging and I had a hard time putting the books down, especially toward the end.
  • (3/5)
    Sweet, funny chick lit. Why are we always surprised when siblings are so different? Rose is the steady, responsible lawyer, and Maggie is beautiful, stylish, and struggling with a learning disability. The movie is cute too.
  • (4/5)
    This was a book I saved for vacation - meaning I expected it to be an easy read and entertaining but not too thought-provoking. And for the most part, I was right. It was thoroughly enjoyable, especially since I could relate to many of the sisterly situations. Not a 'deep in thought' type of book, more like a literary cupcake.
  • (5/5)
    Rose, a successful attorney, seems to have very little in common with her drop-dead gorgeous, but irresponsible sister, Maggie. Regardless of their differences, Rose has always bailed Maggie out of trouble - until Maggie crosses the line and breaks the biggest rule of sisterhood. Now it will take their long-lost grandmother to remind them all of the importance of family.