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Good In Bed: A Novel

Good In Bed: A Novel

Escrito por Jennifer Weiner

Narrado por Paula Cale


Good In Bed: A Novel

Escrito por Jennifer Weiner

Narrado por Paula Cale

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (79 valoraciones)
Longitud:
5 horas
Publicado:
May 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780743567466
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

At first my eyes wouldn't make sense of the letters. Finally, they unscrambled. Loving a Larger Woman, said the headline, by Bruce Guberman. Bruce Guberman had been my boyfriend for just over three years, until we'd decided to take a break three months ago. And the larger woman, I could only assume, was me.

Cannie Shapiro never wanted to be famous. The smart, sharp, plus-sized pop culture reporter was perfectly content writitng about other people's lives on the pages of the Philadlphia Examiner. But the day she opened up a national women's magazine to find out that her ex-boyfriend has been chronicling the ex-sex life is the day her life changes forever.

Loving a larger woman is and act of courage in our world, Bruce has written. And Cannie -- who never knew that Bruce saw her as a larger woman, or thought that loving her was an act of courage -- is plunged into misery, and into the most amazing year of her life.

Radiant with wit, bursting with surprises, and written with bite and bittersweet humor, Jennifer Weiner reaches beyond Cannie's story and into the heart of every woman. Gut-level real and laugh-out-loud funny, Good in Bed celebrates the courage of the human spirit and features an unbelievably funny cast of supporting characters, the strangest dog you'll ever encounter, and a heroine you'll never forget.

Publicado:
May 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780743567466
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eighteen books, including Good in Bed, That Summer, and an essay collection, Hungry Heart: Adventures in Life, Love, and Writing. A graduate of Princeton University and contributor to the New York Times Opinion section, Jennifer lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com.

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3.7
79 valoraciones / 83 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (2/5)
    What charm this chicklit book had in its ridiculous plot, was lost in plodding exposition. I was just barely able to make it through in a few spots. Zaftig Canny thinks nobody loves her because she's overweight and her ex-boyfriend is kind of a tool. She moons, she gestates, she runs off with her new celebrity BFF to LA, she freaks out. I was happy to see her happy end.
  • (4/5)
    I found this book on my book shelves at home. How did it get there and when did I get it? I don't know. I decided to read it, even though it is not my usual type of read.

    I ended up really enjoying it. I thought given the title that the book would have more sex, but it was actually pretty tame. The main character, Cannie, is very likable. She complains about being "plus size" although at a size 16 she is pretty average for the United States. The story of her breakup and subsequent second thoughts is interesting and I was rooting for her to find happiness.
  • (4/5)
    It's been a while since I read this but I remember loving it! This is the one that got me hooked on Jennifer Weiner.
  • (3/5)
    Best for: Someone looking for a quick read that has only a marginally absurd premiseIn a nutshell: Journalist Cannie Shapiro deals with many different issues, kicked off by the fact that her ex is writing a magazine column about her.Line that sticks with me: Nothing stood out enough to underline.Why I chose it: I became aware of Ms. Weiner because of the chapter about her in Too Fat Too Slutty Too Loud and thought it’d be fun to check out her work. Starting with her first book.Review: There is so much to enjoy about this book, and one storyline that dropped the rating for me. I’ll talk about what I loved first (mild spoilers below).I’m 6 feet tall and technically overweight (per BMI, which I know is bullshit, but whatever). I’ve never purchased a button-down shirt that I can actually get to close across my bust. What I’m saying is, as far as her feelings about her appearance go, I could certainly relate to Ms. Shapiro. The scene in the weight loss clinic was so wonderfully written that I was practically cheering when the nutritionist went running.I also enjoyed the bit of fantasy fulfillment that occurs in her relationship with the movie start Maxi Ryder. Maxi is such a sweet person who becomes a true friend to Cannie, that I was fine with some of the more absurd things that happened as a result of that friendship.I also enjoyed that Cannie was a strong women in her work life. She wrote the stories she wanted, she didn’t take shit when she was brushed off, and she managed to write a screenplay that gets picked up. And I appreciated that she was complicated - just because she was able to get shit done at work didn’t mean she had everything else worked out.But what I didn’t like was how she spoke of her mother’s relationship with her mother’s partner, Tanya. I get that other reviewers have thought that it was more about Cannie being upset the loss of her old life, but it was so heavy-handed that I found Cannie to be quite homophobic. Especially when she dismisses her (then) boyfriend’s comments about how it’s not cool to be responding this way as being too “PC.” I’ve mentioned before that I have zero tolerance for people who use the term “PC” as an insult. I’m not sure if Ms. Shapiro was trying to be edgy, or didn’t know quite how to give Cannie a personality flaw so she would be more complex, but making her homophobic (and repeatedly revisiting that) was a hugely off-putting.I don’t think Ms. Shapiro meant that, and I’ll look to see if she’s addressed it in other interviews or essays. If not, then I’m probably done with her work. If so, then I might check out another book of hers.
  • (3/5)
    This isn't my usual fare, but my daughter gave it to me and kept asking what I thought of it, so I felt obligated to give it a go. Initially, I found it pretty funny . . . but then it becomes one of those funny-sad books where you learn that the main character has been using humor to hide her pain. While I won't be running out to buy the rest of Weiner's novels, I rahter enjoyed it and certainly understand why they appeal to younger women.
  • (2/5)
    Another whiney.
  • (4/5)
    Jennifer Weiner said this was her favorite of the books she has written.The best is that it is funny and well-written, notably the non-PC Bruce Good in Bed columns.What isn't so great to read are the repeating obsessive thoughts and conversations about good Old Bruce (ended up simply skipping those parts), as well the eating of those cruel foods - veal and foie gras - and the foray into too perfect Hollywood endings with too good to be true Maxi.
  • (3/5)
    Good in Bed is no doubt a Chick-Lit classic. However the first time I read this book, I could not finish it. I was still in high school, around 2007 or 2008. I could not relate to the main character, Cannie, at all. I felt like she needs to grow up (coming from a teen), needs to move on, and she is annoying.
    Now that 10 years have passed. When I saw NetGalley is offering the same book for review, I was willing to give it another try. Since I am not a size zero anymore and older, I am hoping I might be able to understand Cannie more. After reading it, most of the original feelings are still there. The book gets boring towards middle, and talk about her journalism career and her past. All the other scenes are good, my favorites are Bruce's column and Moxie. Cannie really needs to moves on, Bruce has explicitly and publicly said he is done with you many times. The ending is predictable. =(
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    Received a free copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    bittersweet, funny, unexpected - just like life... loved it.
  • (2/5)
    Although I thought it would be "predictable" ending, I didn't see that coming! good read
  • (4/5)
    #118, 2004I enjoyed this book, about a woman who breaks up with her boyfriend, and then questions the wisdom of this when he starts writing a tell-all column for a "glamour" magazine. It's chick-lit, but with a bit more substance than some of the fluffier books in the genre. I was very satisfied with the way it ended, as well - the author chose to go for a more realistic ending, rather than the typical "fairy tale." a href="http://here-be-dragons.livejournal.com/160260.html">LJ Discussion
  • (5/5)
    I won't lie, at first, reading this was a bit of a roller coaster. I'm a size 20 and I hate my body. So at first, I was excited. A plus size woman as a protagonist! One who I could relate to...until I found out her size. Somewhere along the line I stopped considering anything under a size 18 plus size. But as I kept reading, I was entranced. I really could relate to her! On some level at least. I'm married, and I was at my heaviest on my wedding day. But I remember looking in the mirror and thinking, how can he love this? Look at me. I'm so FAT. I'd tried the weight loss programs. I'd had problems at work because of my weight. It was so refreshing to read about Cannie and her internal struggles with her weight and love and life in general. Cannie is a heroine that all girls and women, no matter their size, should and can look up to... This book is revolutionary for me, and I plan on sharing it with my friends and family!

    I received a free copy in exchange for a fair and honest review. And if I'm being totally honest, had I stopped after learning Cannie's dress size, I probably would have given this book 2 stars because I felt so much fatter. But I'm glad I kept reading, or I would have missed out on an amazing story.
  • (5/5)
    I picked up Good in Bed by Jennifer Weiner from Netgalley because it is been recommended to me as a modern classic. It was originally published in 2001. I was 39 years old in 2001. I wish it would have crossed my radar then instead of discovering it at age 54. While only 5' 2 1/2", I am considered a larger woman, a plus size woman, rubenesque, or according to health standards obese. That is how I had thought of myself and like Cannie, the main character in Good in Bed, that was the first and sometimes only attribute I saw in myself: fat.

    Cannie, the heroine of Good in Bed, learns that her weight is not who she is or what she is. She learns through hard experiences and the love of her family and her friends. There is a huge wall she has to break down to believe in herself. The wall was built by her son of a bitch father who told her at age 12 she was fat and no one would ever love her. In the novel, as in life, karma does not always show up when it should so we do not get to see Cannie's father suffer as he made her suffer or ever acknowledge that he has caused any pain to her or her siblings. If karma was a character, the man would have lost everything he held dear, twice.

    Cannie is single and dealing with an ex-boyfriend who wrote an article about loving the larger woman. It humiliates Cannie because although she is not named in the article, only referred to by her first initial, everyone who knows her or the ex know the article is about her. She reminds me a lot of me at that age, late twenties. Although I was already married by then, I still had no confidence in how I looked. My self worth was very much tied to how I perceived others saw me.

    The book is excellent. The characters are fully formed, not two dimensional, even the side characters. The dialogue flows like a normal conversation. Cannie does not need a man or a diet to rescue her and make her complete. I wish I had discovered this book when I was younger. It really opened my eyes about how I still see myself.
  • (3/5)
    Love Cannie Shapiro! She is smart, witty, sassy, talented, and (ahem) PLUS SIZED! Jennifer Weiner hits a high note for women everywhere who love dessert, hate mirrors and loathe bathing suit shopping.

    Cannie has a few unique issues, though. Her father abandoned her family when she was old enough to remember how it felt to be loved by him. Her mother is an out-of-the-closet lesbian living with her first partner, and her ex-boyfriend is writing about her in Weiner's version of Cosmo.

    On the plus side (pun fully intended), she has a wonderful job at a top publication, a stalwart best friend, a new friend who happens to be Hollywood's biggest A-list star, and a so-ugly-it's-cute dog with a less-than-flattering slang name.

    While some of this felt a bit contrived (I totally didn't buy the mom being a lesbian), most of it was quite wonderful. Her shock at the "big news" (no spoiler here!), her longing and second-guessing about breaking up with Bruce, her so-real comments at the weight loss meetings, and her all-encompassing rage at the end...all felt very palatable. Cannie was a real person to me, bringing tears to my eyes toward the end. That is the sign of a true reader buy-in, and I thank Jennifer Weiner for a great few hours on a Saturday afternoon!

    This is the epitome of a by-the-beach-or-pool-chick-lit-ice-cream-sundae-read and I recommend.
  • (4/5)
    Title: Good In BedAuthor: Jennifer WeinerPublisher: Atria BooksSeries: Cannie Shapiro #1Reviewed By: Arlena DeanRating: FourReview:"Good In Bed" by Jennifer WeinerMy Thoughts.....A interesting read of what this plus size (16) girl [Cannie Shapiro] had gone through being called a fatty from childhood and even into her adult life. We find Cannie now at the age of 28 a 'pop culture reporter' for the Philadelphia Examiner and all seemed well until her ex boyfriend (Bruce) writes a byline...."Loving a Larger Woman." This definitely gives her quite a slap in the face. What will Cannie do and how she handled this situations was truly something to read about. I had so many mixed feeling for this heroine because of the way she felt about herself [self-esteem] as she would goes through a little bit of it all...'facing her past, mourning her losses, figuring out just who she is and who she can become.' This story will take the reader around in one huge circle presenting some very interesting situations and people...from Cannie's dad, her mom, her mom's lover and some interesting friends like Samantha, Maxi, Peter an let's not leave out her dog Nifkin to name a few. As Cannie plunged into misery how will she decide to make some changes in her life? For me this is really what I felt this story was all about. Be ready for a long story with lots and lots of drama and I will say there are some humorous parts that had me laughing out loud!I loved this memorable passage.... "I will love myself, and my body, for what it can do-- because it is strong enough to lift, to walk, to ride a bicycle up a hill, to embrace the people that I love and hold them fully, and to nurture a new life. I will love myself because I am sturdy. Because I did not--will not--break."Will Cannie get her HEA? ...Well, you will have to pick up this read to find out.
  • (3/5)
    An awesome author and so funny!
  • (4/5)
    Made the mistake of listening to the 'abridged' audio version. Couldn't understand why it felt like such an incomplete story until I realized it was less than half the original book. I'll review when I've actually read what the author wrote.

    Oh my gosh!! This was like night and day! I really enjoyed this book, loved Cannie's character and her supporting cast. Lots of fun and unforgettable lines. Never, I repeat never try the abridged version! Not worth your time.
  • (3/5)
    I liked it, for the most part, though there's a long part in the second half where believability was stretched a little too far. But this is a first novel, for one thing. For another thing it's about a plus-size woman, a segment of the population too rarely represented. And I really like the voice. The voice made me stay with it.

    Petrea Burchard
    Camelot & Vine
  • (5/5)
    When I started the book I immediately realized -- ack -- I'd read it before! But I re-read it and enjoyed it even more the second time. Cannie is a wonderful, strong, engaging female character and I loved renewing the acquaintance. In fact, many of the characters are fantastic, different and strong and rarely a cliche in the bunch. Cannie's fight with self-image, rooted in an abandoning father and life as a Larger Woman, make her struggle for a joyful life that much more difficult.Enough for now. An enjoyment.
  • (2/5)
    I finished [Good in Bed] today. It was a very quick poolside read for me (I started last night), but not a very satisfying one. It starts off well, very witty and quick-moving, but it doesn't really go anywhere. Even the critiques of chick lit and the weight loss/dieting industry feel only skin deep. I had been hoping that this was one of those books that appears to be chick lit but has a deeper message, but I didn't get the depth, or even the winks, that I'd hoped for. I do think that Weiner is a talented writer; her syntax and diction are certainly a step up from the average popular chick lit. Are there other books of hers that have more depth?
  • (2/5)
    I didn't dislike this book, but I really can't say I enjoyed it. Was not what I was expecting - more of a book about depression than anything else.
  • (3/5)
    Somehow, when this book first came out, I never did read it. However, I have read and enjoyed many of Jennifer Weiner’s books. I jumped at the chance when NetGalley offered to provide me the book in exchange for an honest review. After reading it, all I can say is, that this book just did not cut it for me. Cannie Shapiro is a plus size 16 who has battled the bulge all of her life. At 28, she works for the Philadelphia Examiner. When she picks up the current edition of another magazine and discovers that her ex-boyfriend Bruce has written a lengthy account of their relationship, “Loving a Larger Woman”, exposing some of her most personal details to the world, Cannie gets upset, trying to figure out how to handle this. Jennifer Weiner provides an interesting though somewhat long and convoluted story about just how Cannie does that. The reader follows Cannie through the aftermath of the article discovery, her confrontation with her ex, her attempts to “slim” down, and her unexpected discovery, after a one-night tryst with her ex in an interesting (to say the least) attempt to console him and make up after his father’s funeral, and how her life moves on to new, interesting directions. The story moves along steadily, as Cannie moves along in life after her ex. However, I did find a few of the events that occurred in Cannie’s life to be a bit mind boggling and almost too much to believe, which is one main reason I think I found the book wanting. Yes, things happen in life, but the author threw in a bit too many, rather far-fetched events for my taste. I also never did grow to like or respect the main character Cannie. She came across as too self-centered and somewhat immature and non-accepting, always seeming to blame others, wanting things she had to know were really beyond her reach. She also became too obsessed with her ex, when he made it plain he never intended to get back with Cannie. Finally, there was Peter, who just happened to come along at the right moment. A bit too many “coincidences” for one story line, in my opinion. In addition, I am not sure about her relationship with Peter, her one-time doctor when Cannie was trying to lose weight. Not sure about the blending of personal and professional lines.The book is okay, just not great. I think there are many other books by Jennifer Weiner that are far better and which I like more. However, this is an early book, so she obviously has matured as a writer. I read somewhere that a lot of the book was autobiographical, which I found interesting. It was good to see such a well done book about larger women, and to learn about some of the discrimination they experience. I think anyone who enjoys the author and who is looking for a book they may have missed years ago or who wants to reread the book might enjoy this one.
  • (3/5)
    3.5 starsCannie wanted to take a break from her 3 year relationship with Bruce. Until Bruce, a reporter/editorialist, writes about Cannie in the paper and describes what it's like to love a “larger” woman. Suddenly, Cannie is having some trouble dealing with this, as all her friends and family recognize that the article is about her. I actually did identify with Cannie for the first half of the book (at least with her emotions, but not necessarily her actions!), and because of that, I liked the first half of the book better. A lot of issues are dealt with in this book, which made it interesting, as well. Overall, I liked the book.
  • (3/5)
    A curious novel, this one. It starts off very sharply indeed, but Cannie isn't at this point the strongest of heroines - in fact she does get rather wimpy after a while. However it's perfectly realistic until about half way through when she suddenly ends up being a total success in Hollywood. What??!!! The Hollywood sections are actually very poorly written and it's cliche after cliche, sadly. At this point, the book was heading rapidly downhill to a 2 star rating, whereas before it had hovered somewhere between 3 and even 4 stars.Honestly, it's as if Weiner left the building and someone else - possibly her cat? - was writing this section for her. I can't really think of any other explanation … However, fear not, as all is not lost - the end sections when Cannie returns from pesky Hollywood (hurrah!) are just great and the ending and the eventual love interest are very good indeed.As a result, it gains a 3 star rating, but no higher due to that soggy middle. It needed a far more talented editor, but it's interesting work.
  • (4/5)
    I can't believe it took me so many years to read this book! Having now read it and loved it I just wish I'd read it at the time I was reading "In Her Shoes". I think now I'd better get cracking on filling in the other gaps I have in my Jennifer Weiner reading experience!

    I thought "Good In Bed" was wonderful, I really empathised with Connie and got completely swept away by her story. I laughed, I got angry at other characters and I cried throughout the course of the book. Great stuff!
  • (4/5)
    on Thursday, July 01, 2004 I wrote about this book:


    Wow I,ve just finished reading this book and with regret that is.
    I really loved reading this book and did not expect that at all.I thought it would be a "trying very hard to be funny book" It was an emotional book. I have been laughing but also on the verge of tears on the last 2 chapters.



    Update February 28-2010.
    I finished this book last night and yes I must admit I would not give this book 5 stars now. 4 stars would be better. Really still liked it but I have become more critical because I've read so many good books in the last couple of years. It was still a fun read but also sometimes very unbelievable.Planning to watch the movie some time. Really curious about the sequel.
  • (2/5)
    This book was well written and easy to read but something was missing and I could not enjoy reading it. I don't know what is it: maybe the constant pointing out how Cannie is a large woman. Or maybe I was not in the mood to join her in her wallowing in self-pity.
  • (3/5)
    I think one reason why I will be generous in rating this book highly is that I have just read a shitty book of so-called same genre. Again, it is not chick-lit per se, and I don;t know what else to call it. It is much maturer (thanks books of the genre) and the lead character is nothing like airhead Becky Bloomwood. She is Candace Sharpie, a journalist, more mature - a young twenty eight who is trapped in a body she thinks is fat. Her ex writes a sex column for man called 'Good in Bed' - where he shares his memories of her column after column. In between, lot of twists and turns later Cannie learns to live. It is not frivolous (that is, full of love and men :P), and despite its cheeky title it has lot of sadness going on latter part. But that said, what I loved was some of Cannie's memories - one about how she learnt swimming, it seemed a realistic, sweet story where in author did put some real thought into the plot.

    Also, I learnt that one should be thankful of shitty books since they help you appreciate some such writing that you had always deemed 'easy'. :)
  • (3/5)
    quick easy fun read -- funny too!
  • (1/5)
    I guess women's fiction just isn't my cup of tea. Everything was sad and depressing. This woman had no control over her life. And (yes, spoiler, sort of) she magically becomes skinny when she faces a tragedy so she stops eating, walks constantly and does various other things to endanger her health. But that's ok...because she's skinny? What a weird overall message. I put the book down feeling just sad and wishing I hadn't read it.