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Bad Case of Stripes, A (Spanish)

Bad Case of Stripes, A (Spanish)

Escrito por David Shannon

Narrado por Sandra Colmenares


Bad Case of Stripes, A (Spanish)

Escrito por David Shannon

Narrado por Sandra Colmenares

valoraciones:
4.5/5 (72 valoraciones)
Longitud:
15 minutos
Publicado:
Aug 1, 2009
ISBN:
9780545438674
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

Camilla Cream loves lima beans, but she never eats them. Why? Because the other kids in her school don't like them. Camilla Cream is very worried about what other people think about her, but at the very moment she most wants to fit in, she becomes completely covered in colorful stripes! Worse yet, she seems to change colors to match whatever is happening around her. When the class says the Pledge of Allegiance, she turns red, white, and blue! Instead of blending in, she's standing out.

Specialists are called but the situation goes from bad to worse. Isn't there anyone who can help Camilla remember what it means to be herself?

Sure to invite discussion, this is an engaging book that imaginatively explores the risks of trying to be like everyone else.

Please note: this audiobook is in Spanish.
Publicado:
Aug 1, 2009
ISBN:
9780545438674
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor

DAVID SHANNON is the illustrator of many popular picture books, including How I Became a Pirate. His numerous awards include a Caldecott Honor for No, David! He lives in Burbank, California.


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4.3
72 valoraciones / 106 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (4/5)
    I loved this book when I was little, the colors and the pictures were amazing
  • (4/5)
    Camilla loved lima beans but did not eat them because no one else did. Before school looked in mirror and looked like a rainbow. Went to school and everybody laughed at her. Cured when she finally ate lima beans again.
  • (5/5)
    Gorgeous illustrations and such a beautiful example of why it is so important to be yourself!
  • (5/5)
    Summary:A young girl, Camilla, wakes up one day and discovers that she is cover in colorful stripes. The book follows a couple days in her life where she discovers the stripes change colors and shapes and doctors are baffled. It all boils down to eating vegetables and being yourself. Personal Reaction:I remember this book from when I was younger. I liked the presentation of the material and most certainly remember hating Lima Beans with a passion because of their evil power. Class Extension:Maybe talk to the kids about eating the vegetables, or how teasing one another is not nice or fun.
  • (5/5)
    I had never read this book before but it was adorable. Lima beans is a good thing for children to relate to because many children do not like them. As a child I loved them! So as an adult I was able to relate to the book. In the classroom this could be a good resource for students. It could help them learn about people and their differences. Everyone could share stories about food they love and maybe others don't normally eat.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book for the vivid illustrations and colors. It really captured my attention as a child and remains one of my favorite books. I love the message the book sends, to be yourself and learn that conforming to others likes or dislikes isn't always the best thing for you.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book! This was my mother's favorite book to read to me. She was just like Camilla, the main character in the story who LOVED lima beans. My mother would read this story to me and we would have so much fun. The pictures are almost just as important as the text of the story. They give great detail to what was happening to Camilla and the many colors, patterns, and shapes Camilla was turning into. They were so fun for me to look at. Another thing I liked in this story were the characters. The main character was Camilla, who in the beginning of the story, was worried about what other people thought of her. She was worried about how she looked and what she ate. By the end of the story, she was eating her lima beans proudly, no matter what other people thought.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: Camilla is a young girl who loves lima beans but is afraid that her friends will make fun of her if they find out. The first day of school is tomorrow and she is trying to decide what to wear to impress her friends. When she wakes up she is covered from head to toe in stripes like a rainbow. Doctors can't figure out what is wrong with her and every time someone says a different pattern at school, a portion of Camilla's skin turns to it. Specialists and experts looks at her and every thing they rule out like measles, virus, bacteria, she becomes them. Then she even becomes her room due to a lady telling her to become one with her room to relax Camilla. After she becomes all of these things with no cure an old lady declares that Camilla has a very bad case of STRIPES. She insists that Camilla wants to eat some lima beans, but Camilla denies that she likes them because she is afraid of being made fun of still. Then she can't take it anymore and eats the lima beans and everything turns back to normal. Now Camilla eats lima beans whenever she wants them. Personal Reaction: This story is a great example of how peer pressure turns bad and shows that we need to all be ourselves and not worry about what other people think.Classroom Extension Ideas: 1. I would ask my students to name something they really like, then ask how many people like the same thing.2. We would talk about how just because your friends don't like everything you like does not mean you don't have the right to like it.
  • (5/5)
    This is such a great story. Everybody can relate to this book. A little girl who refuses lima beans, but actually really loves them. She won't eat them, because she will get made fun of for it. She ends up getting the stripes and her body takes on everything everyone else is saying to her. For example, she goes to school and the class sings the Star Spangled Banner and Camilla's body turns red, white, and blue with stars! There is not a person in the world that has or has not done something to avoid getting made fun of. When Camilla finally eats her lima beans all of the craziness goes away and she can just be herself! I highly recommend this book to children of all ages.
  • (5/5)
    This book makes it okay for students to be themselves. That's the power in this book and the brilliance of it. It is a lovely book full of humor and ups and downs.
  • (5/5)
    This book has a lot of opportunities for a reader to read with expression. This book contains a really big problem and has a great solution.I could also, use this book as a mentor text to show how David Shannon uses time passing transitions.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a little girl, Camilla, who loves lima beans. One day, someone tells her that lima beans are gross, and Camilla decides not to eat them anymore because she's embarrassed. Then all these scary changes start to happen to her body: her skin breaks out in stripes, plaid, and checkerboard. She grows a tail and tree branches. Her parents call in every doctor, spiritual leader, and professional healer that they can find, but nothing helps. But one day, a woman shows up at her family's door, claiming to know the solution. Camilla just had to eat lima beans again. And she was cured.This book is a great story about how dangerous it can be to give into peer pressure. Yes, this is a nonsense story, because no one grows a tail because of their dietary choices. But some parts are realistic. The consequences of Camilla's choice were very serious. She couldn't go to school, she was surrounded by doctors all the time, and she was alienated by her friends. This could be a warning against many dangerous choices later in life, not just whether or not you eat lima beans.
  • (3/5)
    This poor girl had trouble picking out something to wear for her first day of school, and this took her on journey she'll always remember. She wore strips, poka dots, plade and everything that the people around her said. This book was very drawn out was sort of confusing.
  • (4/5)
    This story is pretty silly but very cute! The illustrations are fun, to boot! I think this story dramatizes how children might feel different, but all's well that ends well here. Hooray for lima beans!
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book for the illustrations. The illustrations were detailed and engaging to the reader. For example when Camilla Cream becomes the American Flag and changes all sorts of colors. I also liked this story for the writing. The storyline was engaging and fun to listen too, readers don't know what color Camilla will turn next. The big idea of the story is to stay true to yourself and not worry what others will think of you.
  • (4/5)
    In my opinion, this is a great book. I enjoyed the illustrations and the characters. As I read the book, I felt that the illustrator did a great job portraying how Camilla changed over time. First, her body was filled with stripes, then she went to school and other patterns appeared on her body, such as the american flag, polka dots, and checkers. I also liked the portrayal of the characters because I felt that they were all different in their own way. Although the story is a fantasy, the characters were well-developed and their relationships with one another were believable. The doctor helped Camilla with her medications, but the old woman in the end helped Camilla become herself again by simply feeding her lima beans. After Camilla ate the lima beans, the "real her" came out and she was spotless, and healthy again.The big idea of the story is to appreciate who you are, and that it is not necessary to suppress personality traits just to fit in.
  • (2/5)
    Really enjoyed this when I was a kid, but it also weirded me out a bit too... never could quite put my finger on it.
  • (5/5)
    grades: k-5modern fantasyI absolutely love this book. Has amazing illustrations and a great message. This story is also comical and entertaining. Camilla Cream is the main character and is a young girl who is very concerned about her image. She is so worried about what others think of her that she refuses to eat her favorite food, lima beans, in fear of being made fun of. When she becomes sick with the stripes she is taught a hard lesson on being yourself. At the end of the story nothing made her stripes go away except lima beans. She learned to do what she liked no matter what anyone said, and she would be happy. Although Camilla learned this through a case of stripes this is a lesson many children will have to learn. Hopefully this book can help them gain the confidence to do so. I gave this book five stars and would definitely recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    Review: In my opinion this is a great book for children to read or listen to. It is very relatable for children because it talks about how the little girl didn't eat lima beans. Most children don't like lima beans so they might be able to relate to that or many other events that happen in this book. Summary: The story starts with a little girl named Camilla who loved lima beans but never ate them because none of her friends like them. She starts getting ready for her first day of school, but she doesn't know what to wear. She was always worried about what people thought of her so she tried on so many outfits. When she didn't know what to wear she screamed and her mother ran up and screamed too. Camilla looked and she was covered in rainbow stripes. Camilla's mom put her in bed, told her she couldn't go to school, and called the doctor. The doctor said he had never seen anything like this before. At school the next day everyone was laughing at her and yelling designs at her so that her body would change into them. She was covered in polka dots, stars, checkers, and many other things. Camilla was not allowed to go to school anymore. After the doctors gave her many pills to try, her body turned into a pill! Everything that the doctors gave her added to weird appearance. The therapist told her to not think about it and melt into her room. All of a sudden she turned into her room. Her mouth was her bed and her face was on the walls. Finally a little woman gave Camilla some lima beans and she turned back to her normal self. Argument:
  • (5/5)
    This is a modern fantasy picture book about a little girl who is afraid of what people think. She is so conscious of it that she refuses to eat lima beans, which are her favorite. On the first day of school she is particularly worried, then she looks in the mirror and screams. She is covered in stripes from head to toe. Every time a doctor tries something she morphs into whatever they say or try. No one seems to be able to help her. Until one day a little old lady says she has the cure. All the girl has to do is eat lima beans and things will go back to normal. The girl laughs at first afraid of what people will think. But she changes her mind and sure enough she turns back to normal. Now she eats lima beans without caring what people think.
  • (5/5)
    This book encourages children to eat their vegetables and not give into what others are doing. There is no reason to care what others think of you.
  • (1/5)
    My daughter is in 1st grade (age 6) and is TERRIFIED of this book. I realize it is very, very popular but my daughter has a great imagination and now she is very scared of eating orange, green, and blue foods. She pretty much only eats pink/red and white foods now.

    We got this book as a gift from my father when she was 4 and it scared her. We asked her preschool class to put it behind other books so she wouldn't see it in the book area (if she did see it, she wouldn't go near it). In kindergarten we warned her teacher and it wasn't an issue. Now in 1st grade I have warned her new teacher however I know it is in the classroom and she is scared of it. Today the principal read the first half during lunchtime and she covered her ears but could not block the sound. She is dreading lunchtime tomorrow when he will finish the book (and go through the part where the girl is all stripes).

    (She ended up eating lunch in the school office that day so she wouldn't have to hear the story.)

    SO if you have a sensitive child like I do, I urge some caution with this book. Never mind the author's intended message, some kids will be freaked out by the possibility of foods causing them to change colors and may suffer anxiety for months, or years, to come.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent method for talking to children about conformity! Perfect for my 9-year-old, who has just begun to ask me not to do various things outside in the neighborhood, as the "cool kids" might see. Ugh!
  • (5/5)
    This book follows the misadventure of a girl who wants to fit it- even if it means pretending to hate her beloved Lima beans. She turns colors and shapes until she is so different that she can't fit in and learns to love who she is.
  • (4/5)
    Great imagination of a story that teaches a lesson throughout. It has a somewhat hidden message of eating vegetables, being yourself, standing up to others for what you like, and how someone feels about being teased. I enjoyed it a lot and could see it as a really great read aloud book.
  • (5/5)
    Camilla is young girl who loves Lima beans but will not eat them all because her fellow classmates do not like them. Camilla is always worried about what other people think about her. Camilla reminds me a lot of myself when I was in grammar school. I always worried about what my classmates thought of me.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book for many reasons. One thing that made the book extremely interesting to read were the illustrations! With the book centering on a little girl and her case of the "stripes", the bright colors and large pictures really helped the reader to visualize what she was going through. I think the story flowed very well, and was written at a good pace to keep the reader interested. Although the disease of the stripes is not very believable, the main character was and I think many young readers would be able to identify with her. The main message and idea of this book is that it is extremely important to stay true to yourself and to follow your own path and instincts.
  • (4/5)
    A Bad Case of Stripes is a story about how peer pressure truly can affect someones life. This book has one of the most creative illustrations I have ever seen. David Shannon makes each character so colorful and uses colors on Camilla to show her transformations throughout the story. The story teaches the readers that no matter what other people say or think about you, to be true to yourself. I think the language and the meaning of the story is more appropriate for older children.
  • (5/5)
    Camilla turns all kinds of patterns because she is afraid to be herself and embrace what she likes, lima beans. This book reveals that trying to please others causes nothing but problems, or in this case, colors. A funny and outrageous way to teach students to accept themselves and others, also to celebrate individual differences instead of passing judgement. After all, its hard work to not be yourself.
  • (5/5)
    In this book a little girl is so worried about what everyone is going to think of her because she likes to eat lima beans and everyone else does not like them. Well the little girl lies about liking them and one morning she is trying on dresses for the first day of school and she can not decide what to wear after trying on so many outfits, the next thing you know she is covered in stripes. No one could figure out what was going on with her and every time someone tried it made it worse. Then came along a little old lady who knew all see needed was to eat some lima beans and finally the little girl admitted that she loved lima beans and eat them and changed back into herself. The main idea is always be yourself even if some people may not like you. I like this book because the illustrations are setup in the book where they take up both pages of the book after every fourth page, until you get to the middle of the book than there are six pages where the illustrations are on both pages of the book and at the end of the book it goes back to illustrations on one side of the book. I think the illustrator did that to show the each progression of the illness got worse. Another reason I like this book is that every time someone told the character they wanted her to change she did and the illustrations portrayed it very well, like when the doctors told her to take all those pills she turned into pill. Over all I like the story and that it tells you to be yourself no matter what.