Encuentra tu próximo/a audiolibro favorito/a

Conviértete en miembro hoy y escucha gratis durante 30 días
From Time to Time: The Sequel To Time And Again

From Time to Time: The Sequel To Time And Again

Escrito por Jack Finney

Narrado por Campbell Scott


From Time to Time: The Sequel To Time And Again

Escrito por Jack Finney

Narrado por Campbell Scott

valoraciones:
3/5 (8 valoraciones)
Longitud:
4 horas
Publicado:
Mar 1, 1995
ISBN:
9780743547420
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro

Descripción

The long-awaited sequel to Time And Again

Si Morley is back and the world may never be the same.


When Time and Again was published in 1970, it immediately developed a loyal following that has grown with each passing year. Now, twenty-five years later, Jack Finney returns to the same magical territory and finds Ruben Prien still at work with the Project, still dreaming of altering man's fate by going back in time to adjust events...to interfere, some might say, with destiny.

Once again, the conduit to that bygone era is Simon Morley, the man who actually proved himself capable of traveling back and forth in time. This time, he does so with a grand purpose: an attempt to prevent World War I.

A tale that is both thrilling and nostalgic, magical and terrifying, ultimately charming and full of suspense, From Time To Time is the sequel a generation has been waiting for.
Publicado:
Mar 1, 1995
ISBN:
9780743547420
Formato:
Audiolibro

También disponible como...

También disponible como libroLibro


Sobre el autor

Jack Finney (1911–1995) was the author of the much-loved and critically acclaimed novel Time and Again, as well as its sequel, From Time to Time. Best known for his thrillers and science fiction, a number of his books—including Invasion of the Body Snatchers—have been made into movies.

Relacionado con From Time to Time

Audiolibros relacionados
Artículos relacionados

Reseñas

Lo que piensa la gente sobre From Time to Time

2.8
8 valoraciones / 13 Reseñas
¿Qué te pareció?
Calificación: 0 de 5 estrellas

Reseñas de lectores

  • (2/5)
    I had hoped it would be better than 'Time and Again', but it was worse.
  • (3/5)
    I did not like this nearly as well as Time and Again. In fact, I almost put the book down for good about halfway through when Si was talking things through with Rube because I was so bored with it. The book did get more interesting once Si traveled back to the early 1900's, but there were still sections that I skimmed over because they just weren't that interesting. If I didn't like Time and Again so well, I think I would have given up on this one much earlier. I did not like the way that things were done in the beginning of this book to change the ending of the previous book. I did like the way that certain things happend with Helen (the Jotta Girl) with her scarf on the Titanic near the end of the book.
  • (2/5)
    Although I haven't read the predecessor, I had high hopes for this time travel novel. Well, those hopes were tough to fulfill; this book was a small disappointment. DO NOT READ THIS BOOK FOR THE PLOT!! This novel is for time travel geeks only (like me)! Finney can paint a humanly realistic mural of a historic setting in a unique first person narrative, and that's where this book shines. But it lacks a reasonable plot. Many of the character decisions are rash, half-hearted attempts to do something, usually accompanied with some driving force, either a desperate ploy to avoid futility or an obsessive zeal for some trivial detail. The main character seems to tell himself on every page, "I have no idea what I'm supposed to do here, so I'll just play along until something happens." Like a session of any 'adventure' computer game (Myst and Starship Titanic come to mind), the hero stumbles around haphazardly, lost in a puzzle as big as the world, until he succeeds out of serendipity rather than clever resourcefulness. Despite the plot's shortcomings, I did enjoy the playfulness with which Finney approaches history. He treats it as a thing of wonder, like the awe a child feels upon visiting Disneyland. He truly loves the past, loves thinking about the past, and loves using words to turn a time period in his hands like a whimsical toy. If it is possible to feel nostalgic about an era 70 years before I was born, this book has accomplished that. [Pasted from my blog from the original 8 June 2006 post]
  • (4/5)
    While entertaining, this sequel to "Time and Again" does not capture the excitement of the original. I feel this has nothing to do with the reader being in on the devices used to negotiate time travel, but Finney fails to capture the time period as well as he did in the original.The opening scenes are very well done. We come in on a therapy session, of sorts, for people who remember history a little differently than what is generally accepted: JFK's second term in office, seeing the majesty of the Titanic as she docks in New York and other historic anomalies. Wonderful characterization, great believable dialog.Somehow, the writing falls flat and all the edges are lost when the main characters travel back in time to try and change history. I think this is the source of the shortcomings of the novel, it concentrates on trying to change history, rather than chronicle the life the characters are immersed in. That was the attraction of "Time and Again", the intimate look into another time period.Still, Finney's skill is above average in this tale. It is too bad that the sequel was not as good as the original. Suggested if you like stories that play with the stream of time.
  • (1/5)
    If you like his other books, AVOID this one. If you've never read him, read his other books.
  • (3/5)
    I had heard that this book was not nearly as good as it's predecessor, Time and Again. Since I didn't think Time and Again was so great, I wasn't even sure there was a point to reading this one. But I was curious, so I did. And in some ways, I actually thought this book was better than the first one, or at least it had more potential.This book begins with a group of people gathering to compare evidence of what I'll call "echoes" from alternate timestreams. I thought this was a very interesting way to begin: those who had read Time and Again would, of course, suspect that the echoes were caused by Si Morley's presence in the 19th century, but group didn't seem to have any idea what was causing the echoes. If Finney had chosen to continue with the thread of this question, this could have been a really interesting book.Unfortunately, this line of thinking is never really developed. Instead, Finney gives us something that is really just an echo of the first book. First Finney essentially changes the ending of Time and Again, so that the Project exists, and then sends Si back to the present because he wants to find out what's going on with his old friends. He finds Rube, who has evidence of a timestream where WWI never happened (this is the only furtherance we see of the plotline from the beginning) and Si agrees to go back to 1912 to see if he can prevent the Great War.In some ways it was more interesting to follow Si on his first time travel adventure, when all he was really trying to do was observe, rather than change things. Ultimately, however, Si's efforts to change things don't amount to much, so all he really does is observe things in a different time, making this largely the same story that Finney told already, but with more unfulfilled potential.
  • (4/5)
    This is the sequel to Time and Again. I think the first book was a little more exciting, but of course I enjoyed both the books. This time Simon Morley travels to 1912 in an attempt to discover and safeguard the path of some important papers which may prevent World War I.
  • (3/5)
    This was a disappointing sequel to the author's Time and Again. It started off very well with tantalising clues about fake historical memories lodged in the minds of rare individuals, e.g. memories of the Titanic safely docking in New York or of JFK's second term re-election in 1964. The first 130 pages were very good. But then the novel digressed into a social history of New York of 1912, with a particular obsessive interest in vaudeville. The author clearly did extensive research, but this halted the plot almost totally for 100 pages. The final resolution on the Titanic seemed rather rushed and rather unconvincing. A pity.
  • (4/5)
    More compelling than Time and Again. He made me love New York in 1911 and made a great argument for the happiness and contentment that abounded in pre-war America. Such a shame that he died in 1995. This book cried out for a sequel as he left the door wide open on a couple of threads of the story.
  • (3/5)
    Strange, somewhat forced, good story with immense detail in the oddest sometimes unnecessary places. Kind of saw the end coming...though the rationale did not really match the flow of other time altering events presented earlier. Glad to have read it though!
  • (3/5)
    This is the sequel to Finney's story "Time and Again" and was published in 1995, 25 years after the original and shortly before his death. It is set with the present being 3 or 4 years later than the prior book's 1970. When I started to read this I completely got sucked in and thought it was even better than the first. Unfortunately what seemed like an excellent story soon lost steam and went astray by the middle of the book. There is some excellent intrigue in here including bits involving the Titanic, a mysterious operative or two, some good bits on early aviators, and the New York Theater and Vaudeville scene of 1912, so I don't want to really knock the book, but some of it such as the theater stuff goes on too long. One of the strengths from the first book that is missing here is the romance that developed between two of the principal characters. The characters and setup in the opening pages here showed a lot of promise. History was getting reset and some people were noticing. Some are investigating what is going on in their small way. One old gentlemen has dual memories concerning the Titanic. He has extraordinarily vivid memories of skipping a day of school and being at the dock with his father as The Titanic came into New York and the passengers disembarking. Yet, he also knows the ship sunk. These characters then disappeared from the story. I wanted more of them. We see an important event from the first book that was reset, get reset again (slightly confusing). The book didn't quite start sinking like the Titanic; more like it was adrift without quite enough steam. A big idea within this book is that World War One was avoided - it didn't happen according to some evidence in the story but then it did because someone travelled back in time and changed something. I would not recommend that this book be read as a standalone. It could be ... but so much groundwork was established in the first novel "Time and Again" that this book would come across as much weaker without that background. An enjoyable book, but as I have noted, just not up to par with the first. The end was OK and seemed to leave the door open for another sequel.
  • (3/5)
    This sequel to Time and Again wasn‘t as compelling as the original story was. This time around, Si, the same main character in the original, time-travels to 1912 New York City. Not on a whim, of course, although he has his own motives for doing so.It started out strong, but became weaker as I continued to read. I wonder if this would have been a stronger book if it had been written/published sooner after the original -- as it was, they were out about 20 years apart.
  • (3/5)
    This sequel to Time and Again was published 25 years after the original, and while it does have the same characters, it does not possess the same intensity and drive as the first book. Simon does time travel, and again meets with Rube. The purpose? To save the man who maybe could have stopped The Great War. But Rube also gives Si additional incentive. And if that isn’t interesting enough, why not add in the great ship, The Titanic? With all this going on, and with the wonderful characters developed in the first book, this sequel should have been a knockout, but alas, it is not. It bogs down in the middle, before it finally comes back to life at the very end. Real fans of first book will probably enjoy this one, too, but will likely be disappointed in its comparison to the first.