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One Fine Day

One Fine Day

Escrito por Nonny Horgrogian

Narrado por Emery Battis


One Fine Day

Escrito por Nonny Horgrogian

Narrado por Emery Battis

valoraciones:
3.5/5 (19 valoraciones)
Longitud:
5 minutos
Publicado:
Jan 1, 1973
ISBN:
9780545258531
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descripción

A fox needs to do some fast talking and walking before he can get his tail sewn back in this delightful cumulative tale
Publicado:
Jan 1, 1973
ISBN:
9780545258531
Formato:
Audiolibro


Sobre el autor


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Lo que piensa la gente sobre One Fine Day

3.3
19 valoraciones / 16 Reseñas
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Reseñas de lectores

  • (5/5)
    One Fine Day written and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian had an old-school feel to it (which probably stands to reason, considering it was published in the early 70’s). The story is about a fox who steals a few laps of milk from an old woman in order to quench his thirst. He is promptly punished for his theft, and the only way the old woman will sew his tail back on is if he reimburses the milk he stole from her. That proves to be difficult, as the cow that can help him will only do so if he brings her some grass. Then the field says the fox may have some grass if he brings it water. This continues throughout the story for each character the fox encounters. The text reminded me of the old children’s song “There Was an Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly", in the sense that the mini-quests the fox embarks on are repeated to everyone he encounters.
  • (5/5)
    One Fine Day can be used to teach children to not take what isn't theirs. A fox takes something that isn't his and the lady that he was stealing from cuts off his tail. He has to go on a journey in order for the lady to sew child's tail back on. Fox learned his lesson.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a really cute book for children. A fox drinks an old lady's milk, something he wasn't supposed to do, and has to suffer the consequence, his tail being cut off. To make it up to the old lady and to get his tail back he must get her more milk. It took alot of time and hard work from the fox to make things right again. This books is all about consequences and about how when you do something wrong, its not always easy to make it right again.
  • (5/5)
    A thirsty fox drinks an old woman’s milk, and she cuts off his tail in anger. He begs her to sew it back on, but she says she won’t until he gives her milk back. He is then sent on a long chase to get the milk as he makes trades. The cow wants grass, the grass wants water, the water wants a pail, and so on. Finally an old man feels bad for him and gives him something for nothing allowing him to pay back everyone and get the milk for the old woman. Once he gives the milk to her, she sews his tail back on.The theme to this book is consequences. I believe children can learn a lot from the fox’s mistake. If you do something wrong, it is likely that there will be consequence. In this case, the fox had the opportunity to make right what he had wronged, but it wasn’t easy and took a lot of time and hard work. It is good to think before you act.
  • (3/5)
    Fox must get his tail back, so he must find what everyone else wants so they will help him.
  • (4/5)
    This Caldecott winner depicts life in Armenia as a fox attempts to replace milk he has stolen from an old woman. A great story to read when tallking to a class about not taking things that don't belong to you.
  • (3/5)
    This story was about a fox who is one day walking through the fields and is very thirsty . He sees a jug if milk while the owner of the jug turns her head, the fox drinks most of it. She turns around and sees him doingthis and cut off his tail, She says if he finds her some milk that she will sew his tail back on. He has to go to all these different people but finally finds milk. This is a cute book that talks about consequences. If you do somehting you need to realize that their are actions.
  • (3/5)
    Used to teach ELL what goes around comes around. There are consequences for your actions. They can understand what is going on with out actually reading the words.Could be used to teach rhythm. Students could do text innovations and write stories about losing something because of a choice that they made and having to go through a long process in order get it back. Adding on to a story piece by piece makes it interesting and is an easy way to make it longer.
  • (2/5)
    A folktale about what happens when a fox steals milk from a woman.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about a fox who stole milk from and old woman, who in tern chops off his tail. The fox then goes on a mission to return milk to the old woman so that she would restore his tail.I enjoyed the illustrations and the repetitive lines.I would use this book in a classroom to show that all things have a price. I would encourage the students to recite the repetative parts of the story alloud with me.
  • (3/5)
    Personal Review:Based on an Armenian folktale, the fox's adventure is a series of steps that will eventually repay the old woman so he can get his tail sewed back on. The story can introduce many common animals and objects from nature to a young reader and the repetitive phrases allow the reader to join in with the story. I didn't find the illustrations particularly inviting, but the story also shares the concept of controlliing one's greed and following through to pay a debt.
  • (3/5)
    This seems like it is based upon a folktale. It is a sweet story about a fox who goes on a quest for milk, only to have his tail chopped off! He has to figure out a way to repay the milk to the old woman so that she will sew his tail back on. This was written and illustrated by the same person, and it is a Caldecott medal winner.
  • (2/5)
    A greedy fox drinks an old lady's pail of milk and then loses his tail for it! The fox is then forced to make up for his crime by replenishing her supply. The text proceeds in a linear fashion as the fox wonders the countryside bartering his way with people, animals, and nature in his quest to make amends with the old woman. The world seems to be a cruel place; the fox whose tail is slashed off finds it difficult to find someone to help him without getting something in return. In the end the fox isn't the only greedy character! The fox proves to be a difficult character to connect with; however, young readers will be cheering for him towards the end of the "tale". The repetitive nature of the text allows for predictability, and listeners will know what to expect during read alouds. While the difficulty level of the text makes this appropriate for elementary school libraries, the morbid backdrop of the story would not have me running to add this to my collection. However, the story stems from an Armenian folktale, and as such would add an element of diversity to a children's book collection.
  • (2/5)
    It is a story about a fox who made his way through the forest and when he got to the other side he was thirsty so he found an old woman with a pail of milk. Before she noticed him he drank all the milk. The old woman saw that and cut off his tail. The fox was upset and asked he to sew his tail bakc on and she said she would if he returned the milk. So in order ot get the milk he had to find a cow and the cow wanted something in return and after the fox had found everything he finally got the old woman to sew his tail. I liked the story because I think children will enjoy trying to guess what happens next in the story. Extention: I would give the children the first few lines of a story and have them finish it.
  • (3/5)
    This book would be good to read to a classroom because it can enhance the memory of young students with the repetition. The teacher can have the children fill in the steps of the story as they go along, and it will make it more interactive and enjoyable.
  • (2/5)
    This book received the Caldecott Medal in 1971. It is about a fox’s journey to get his tail sewn back on so his friends will not laugh at him. He stole milk from an old woman and she chopped off his tail, refusing to sew it back on unless the fox would bring her some more milk. The fox is set off on many errands as he tries to get what he owes the woman in return for his tail.I was caught off guard at the beginning of the book when the woman chopped off the fox’s tail. I did not expect that sort of “violent” reaction in a children’s book. However, I did like the book. My three year old daughter will steal candy from the counter when she thinks no one is looking, so I wanted to read this story to her in hopes that she will begin to see that stealing only causes more trouble. One thing I did not like so much was the idea that the fox only wanted his tail back so that his friends would not laugh at him. This tells children to worry and care what other people think about their appearance. It does not portray true friendship, either, because real friends would not laugh at you.Because this is has a repetitive style of writing, I would incorporate a memory exercise by asking the children to remind me who the fox is getting each item for as I read through the story. I could also take it another way and ask the children where they think the fox would get the next item from. At the end, maybe we could play pin-the-tail-on-the-fox.