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Roth IRA Basics: 11 Things You Must Know

Tax-free income is a dream of every taxpayer. And if you save in a Roth account, it's a reality. Roths are the youngsters of the retirement savings world. The Roth IRA, named after the late Delaware Sen. William Roth, became a savings option in 1998, followed by the Roth 401(k) in 2006. Creating a tax-free stream of income is a powerful retirement tool. These accounts offer big benefits, but the rules for Roths can be complex.

Here are 11 things you must know about utilizing a Roth IRA as part of your retirement planning.

You Pay Taxes Now Instead of Later

Roths turn traditional IRA and 401(k) rules on their head. Rather than getting a tax break for money when it goes into the account and paying tax on all distributions, with a Roth, you save after-tax dollars and get tax-free withdrawals in retirement.

By accepting the up-front tax breaks for traditional IRA accounts, you accept the IRS as your partner in retirement. If you're in the 24% tax bracket in retirement, for example, 24%

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