NPR

Workers In Washington, D.C., Region Likely To Work From Home Until Next Summer

A survey of hundreds of private employers in the region shows most are struggling to bring their employees back into the office. Many firms cited worries about the safety of using public transit.
An almost empty Metro station is seen in Washington, D.C., on July 21. The region's employers worry about the safety of workers using the transit system during the pandemic. Source: Daniel Slim

With so much uncertainty continuing around the coronavirus, it might be next summer before most workers for private employers in the Washington, D.C., area return to the normalcy of their offices.

That's according to a led by the Greater Washington Partnership, an

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