NPR

Foreign Journalists Working For U.S. Government Broadcasters May Lose Visas

The agency, which oversees international media such as Voice of America, is examining visa renewals "case-by-case." Denial could mean expulsion from the U.S. and a return to hostile home countries.

Dozens of foreign nationals working as journalists in the U.S. for the federal government's international broadcasters are at risk of expulsion as the agency determines whether to renew their work visas.

The U.S. Agency for Global Media that it is examining "case-by-case" whether to extend journalists' J-1 visas once they expire. Some of the journalists

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