Los Angeles Times

Gloria Steinem calls 'Mrs. America' 'hopelessly wrong.' This play gets her life's work right

Gloria Steinem has been in the public eye for more than 50 years, but the feminist leader, who turned 86 in March, is having an undeniable pop culture moment. In January, she visited the Sundance Film Festival to promote "The Glorias," a biographical film directed by Julie Taymor. And this Friday, she can be seen in "Great Performances - Gloria: A Life," a presentation of the off-Broadway play starring a longtime friend, Christine Lahti. (There was also "Mrs. America," but Steinem was not involved in the FX on Hulu limited series.)

"I feel as if I'm part of a big consciousness-raising group. I'm contributing my story in a way that I hope encourages other women and men to tell their stories," Steinem says via Zoom. After spending most of the last few months isolated in her New York apartment, Steinem is in California, and she joined Lahti at her Santa Monica home (where they were socially distanced in separate rooms) to talk about "Gloria: A Life."

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