NPR

Quiet, Surreal Drama — And Disappearing Objects — In 'The Memory Police'

Yoko Ogawa's novel takes place on a small island were objects — flowers, photographs, boats — are disappearing, and the mysterious "memory police" work to make sure they're eternally forgotten.
Source: Pantheon

On a small island, objects disappear — perfume, boats, roses, photographs — and the memory police monitor the inhabitants, ensuring these things will be eternally forgotten. It seems like a metaphor for state surveillance; if were an American novel, it might yield a contrarian hero determined to fight off the tyranny of the police. It would be something akin to or the movie version of. One can even envision a high-paid Hollywood actor starring in the Netflix adaptation: They're coming for your memories, but she's got a plan to stop them!

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