NPR

Code Switch Book Club, Summer 2019

For this summer reading list, our listeners suggested a lot of great history, compelling fiction, a few memoirs—and Jane Austen, re-imagined with brown people!
A few of the great books that our listeners recommend for summer reading. Source: Shereen Marisol Meraji

So, Fam: We asked you to suggest good summer reads, and boy, did you respond! Big thanks to everyone who sent thoughts on books we need to get to.

A little road map: we've listed nonfiction first, in alphabetical order, with the person who suggested the book at the end of the suggestion in parentheses.

Then fiction, in the same order. If you see initials only, the suggestion came from someone on the Code Switch team. Some books have been reviewed or some authors profiled by NPR; clicking on the link will take you there. Happy Reading!

Nonfiction:

They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us by Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib

A collection of essays that speak to Willis-Abdurraqib's experiences navigating the intersections between race, culture, music, and growing up Black in America. The book analyzes and critiques the racial and cultural norms dominating modern day society. (MP)

The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity by Kwame Anthony Appiah

A scholarly, philosophical exploration of identity written in an accessible style. Appiah argues that the terms we use to define ourselves are based in myths, which can obscure connections to identities that we hide. He affirms the importance of identity in fostering a sense of belonging, but suggests that we strive to embrace a broader view of ourselves.

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