Fortune

THE INTERNET SPACE RACE

Companies are scrambling to offer high-speed online access from the final frontier.
Several hopefuls have already started launching satellites into orbit.

THE NEXT BILLION PEOPLE who get connected to the Internet may be looking to the heavens. That’s where a race is on to provide online access from fleets of satellites, led by a who’s who of tech and several deep-pocketed startups.

The aim is to help connect people in developing countries, provide speedier online access to mainly rural users who depend on today’s slower and more expensive satellite Internet services, and cater to business customers that want real-time data from their equipment, like oil rigs and ocean

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