The Guardian

Across America, racist and sexist monuments give way to a new future | Rebecca Solnit

Our public landscape is undergoing a deep transformation. It’s not comprehensive or complete – but it’s a powerful foundation
‘You can see what’s going on in public squares and street names as a rough equivalent to #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter’ Illustration: Joey Yu

If you took your history lessons from the street names and the names of bridges and buildings, rivers and towns, you would believe men, mostly white Protestants, did nearly everything that ever mattered. But that is slowly changing: our public landscape is undergoing a deep transformation. And it reflects the shift that is under way in our society, from Alaska to Florida. It’s not enough or comprehensive or complete – but it’s a beautiful start and a powerful foundation for more change to come.

In the spring of this year, New York City of racist gynecologist J Marion Sims from Central Park, and in the fall, the city announced that a statue to Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman to serve in Congress, will be erected in Brooklyn. San Francisco removed a much-loathed monument that showed a Native American man being dominated by a Spanish priest this fall. And a month later, the city renamed the international

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