The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: I'm Not Overweight, But My Mom Keeps Telling Me I Am

Her constant criticism makes interacting with her difficult, and I don’t know how to respond.
Source: The Atlantic

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com.

Dear Therapist,

My mom and I have had a contentious relationship ever since I was a young teenager. She’s always been very preoccupied with weight, and anytime she thought I gained a few pounds, she would point it out and berate me, often to the point of me crying. I should note that I’ve never been anywhere close to overweight at any point during my life. I also go to the gym and try my best to eat relatively healthy. She also tries to micromanage everything around her, criticizing me for the makeup I wear, whether I have my hair down or in a ponytail, and other minute things. I told her these sorts of things hurt my feelings, but she hasn’t stopped.

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