Los Angeles Times

Can simulating evolution on a computer explain our enormous brains?

Compared to the rest of the animal kingdom, the human brain is way out of whack.

Our brains are roughly six times larger than what you would expect for a placental mammal of our stature, scientists say.

And no other animal has a brain as large as ours relative to body size.

So why did humans evolve to have such large brains when other animals did not?

It's a question that evolutionary biologists and anthropologists have been trying to answer for decades.

Our giant brains must have helped our ancestors survive in the African savannah where the first modern humans evolved, but they also came at a metabolic cost.

The human brain represents just

Estás leyendo una vista previa, regístrate para leer más.

Más de Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times3 min. leídos
AT&T Under Pressure To Sell DirecTV Amid Heavy Subscriber Losses
LOS ANGELES - Telecommunications giant AT&T is facing mounting pressure from an activist shareholder to pare down its operations by unloading the El Segundo-based satellite television giant DirecTV, which has been reeling from the loss of millions of
Los Angeles Times5 min. leídos
Minority Contractors Claiming To Be 'Native American' To Undergo Nationwide Review
Federal, state and local authorities are intensifying scrutiny of minority contracting programs across the country in the wake of a Los Angeles Times investigation that found that companies received more than $300 million in government contracts base
Los Angeles Times4 min. leídos
After Week 2 Quarterback Crunch, Chargers' Philip Rivers Counts Blessings, Consecutive Starts
COSTA MESA, Calif. - His dependability is such that, over the last 13-plus seasons, the only thing as guaranteed to start a Chargers game has been the coin toss. On Sunday, Philip Rivers will make his 211th consecutive regular-season start and 222nd