NPR

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

From bass to lobster, hundreds of species that live along U.S. coastlines are projected to migrate north over the next 80 years, making them harder to catch and manage. It's already happening.
Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Source: Portland Press Herald

The oceans are getting warmer and fish are noticing. Many that live along U.S. coastlines are moving to cooler water. New research predicts that will continue, with potentially serious consequences for the fishing industry.

Fish can be as picky about their water temperaturesays a warming climate is heating up their coastal habitats. "Here in North American waters," he says, "that means fish and other marine animals, their habitat is shifting further north quite rapidly."

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