Los Angeles Times

Evolve or die: Why our ancestors learned to be social more than 320,000 years ago

New discoveries in eastern Africa suggest that human behaviors like symbolic thought and the creation of extended social networks were established at least 320,000 years ago - tens of thousands of years earlier than previously thought.

The work, published as a trio of papers Thursday in Science, sheds new light on the often murky story of when our ancestors first started acting like humans, and why, experts said.

"What we are seeing is a complex set of developments that may represent new ways of surviving in an unpredictable environment," said Rick Potts, a paleoanthropologist and director of the Smithsonian's Human Origins program. "It is a package we didn't know occurred so early, and right at

Estás leyendo una vista previa, regístrate para leer más.

Más de Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times5 min. leídosMedical
Uncertainty Surrounds One Of The Two COVID Vaccines India Is Using
MUMBAI, India – As India launches an ambitious effort to vaccinate 300 million people against the coronavirus within six months, it is employing two vaccines — both manufactured domestically but approved under very different circumstances. One is Cov
Los Angeles Times3 min. leídos
First-place UCLA Rallies To Beat Last-place Washington, Improves To 7-0 In Pac-12
LOS ANGELES — Tyger Campbell took the inbounds pass as a timeout was called, allowing the UCLA point guard to unleash his fury on a ball that he slammed to the court with both hands. The lifeless Bruins had just given up another layup to Washington,
Los Angeles Times3 min. leídosBiology
Another New Coronavirus Variant Found Across California
LOS ANGELES — As the total number of coronavirus infections in California approaches 3 million, health officials said Sunday that a new strain — different from a highly contagious variant first identified in the United Kingdom — is popping up more fr