The New York Times

What Happens to Creativity as We Age?

WHEN WE’RE OLDER, WE KNOW MORE. BUT THAT’S NOT ALWAYS AN ADVANTAGE.

One day not long ago, Augie, a 4-year-old Gopnik grandchild, heard his grandfather wistfully say, “I wish I could be a kid again.” After a thoughtful pause, Augie came up with a suggestion: Grandpa should try not eating any vegetables. The logic was ingenious: Eating vegetables turns children into big strong adults, so not eating vegetables should reverse the process.

No grown-up would ever come up with that idea. But anyone with a 4-year-old can tell similar

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