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I went to medical school in Charlottesville. I know white anger well

My four years in Charlottesville were a stark reminder that racism still exists — in my case, in the hospital setting.

This feels all too familiar.

After watching the violence unfold in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend, after watching white supremacists descend on the city where I went to medical school, and onto the University of Virginia campus where I became a doctor, this is what I said to myself.

I’ve seen this anger before.

For four years, my task was to learn to treat people who were sick. Even the ones who, even the ones who on home health visits. My task was to learn from experienced physicians how to help people get well. Even when they witnessed racist behavior directed toward me. Even when they glossed over that bigotry.

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