The Atlantic

'We Must Reject Hate'

Democratic and Republican leaders broadly rejected the violence at a major white-nationalist gathering in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Source: Joshua Roberts / Reuters

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

American political leaders reacted with outrage and condemnation on Saturday after violence erupted at a white nationalist march on the University of Virginia’s campus in Charlottesville.

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency on Saturday morning at the request of Virginia State Police after Friday night skirmishes between hundreds of white nationalists and neo-Nazis who held a torchlit march at a controversial statute of Robert E. Lee on the university campus and dozens of counter-protesters.

Members of Congress denounced the violence on Saturday, which erupted at one of the highest profile white-nationalist events in more than a decade. “The views fueling the spectacle in Charlottesville are

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