NPR

2016 Hit Records For Global Temperature And Climate Extremes

An annual report, comprising data from scientists across the globe, shows it was the warmest on records that date back 137 years. It also saw the highest sea levels and lowest polar sea ice.
A field cleared of sunflowers destroyed by drought is seen in Padina, Serbia, on Thursday. / Shutterstock.com

The year 2016 was the warmest on record for the planet as a whole, surpassing temperature records that date back 137 years, according to an annual report compiled by scientists around the globe.

For global temperatures, last year surpassed the previous record-holder: 2015.

According to, it was also a year of other extremes and records, including the highest sea levels and lowest sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctica. And, it was one of the worst years for droughts.

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