Foreign Policy Magazine

Man of the World

Shakespeare may never have left England, but he became the most global writer who ever lived.

In the run-up to Brexit in June, as Fleet Street tried to figure out why the Leave campaign was so alluring to voters, some observers employed a famous phrase again and again: “this scepter’d isle,” a description of England in William Shakespeare’s Richard II. A scepter is a symbol of royal authority, and a “scepter’d isle” is an unforgettable image of a sovereign England owing allegiance to no outsider. In this year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, his language clearly still manages to capture something essential about the way the people of Great Britain, and especially the English, view themselves.

Estás leyendo una vista previa, regístrate para leer más.

Más de Foreign Policy Magazine

Foreign Policy Magazine7 min. leídosTech
The Spies Who Came In From The Continent
From John le Carré’s novels to the insatiable popular interest in James Bond, Britain has long enjoyed, and cultivated, an image of producing superior spies. This reputation is based on more than myth. For decades during and following World War II, t
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min. leídosTech
Unbreakable
IN THE EARLY DAYS OF THE COLD WAR, the Soviet Union needed a foolproof way to encrypt the messages it sent to its allies. This was a daunting task: The previous pinnacle in cryptography, the German Enigma machine, had been cracked. And not only would
Foreign Policy Magazine15 min. leídosTech
The Spycraft Revolution
Changes in technology, politics, and business are all transforming espionage. Intelligence agencies must adapt—or risk irrelevance.